Blues Cruise is July 23

Ready to cool off with some great food and drink plus entertainment on the water? Smoky Mountain Blues Society will host a Blues Cruise with the Tennessee Riverboat Company in downtown Knoxville on July 23, 2017 from 4:00 pm to 7:00 pm.

This Smoky Mountain Blues Society Blues Cruise will feature entertainment by The Stella Vees of Lexington, Kentucky. Photo submitted.

The Stella Vees are a traditional electric blues band that plays in a similar style to Albert Collins, T Bone Walker, Little Walter and Buddy Guy. With over 18 years of playing and touring together, the band performs a smoking style of blues with an authenticity, intimacy and steadfast dynamic that’s not often found in modern music. They bring to mind the vintage blues once so predominant in Chicago juke joints back in the day, while making it sound fresh and vital for a contemporary crowd.

Tickets are just $16 in advance and $20 at the door. Smoky Mountain Blues Society Members enjoy a special discount. Each voyage will also have a limited food menu and full bar available.

Boarding begins at 3pm. for this event and tickets are available through the Tennessee Riverboat Company’s website, (http://tnriverboat.com/blues-cruises-2/) and by calling (865) 525-7827.


Local art exhibit on Broadway

Broadway Studios and Gallery located at 1127 N Broadway, Knoxville will be hosting Dino Day Liddick and Brandy Slaybaugh in an art show being held through Saturday, August 26, 2017. The opening reception will be held on First Friday, August 5th from 5-9pm. Light refreshments will be served and parking is on premises.

Dino Day Liddick is a self-taught painter currently from Knoxville TN. Rather than pulling ideas together traditionally used to produce “art”, he practices clearing his mind through the process of abstract painting resulting in an artistic product than can be shared. Photo submitted.

Brandy Slaybough works primarily with ink and watercolor. Her work is geared toward pantheistic themes and divinity in small things inspired by mythology & magic, fairy tales, and gods. She questions what is part of this world, what is supernatural, and the blurring of the line between the two. Photo submitted.

Broadway Studios and Gallery is located at 1127 N Broadway, Knoxville, TN. Found 1.5 miles north of the Old City and is between 4th and Gill and Old North Neighborhoods next to Vinyard Flooring. Regular business hours are 10am-6pm Thursday-Saturday or whenever the “open” sign is on throughout the week.

For more info please contact: Jessica Gregory 865-556-8676.

 


August 2017 art at Emporium

The Arts & Culture Alliance is pleased to present five new exhibitions at the Emporium Center in downtown Knoxville from August 4-25, 2017. A reception will take place on Friday, August 4, 2017 from 5:00-9:00 PM as part of First Friday activities downtown to which the public is invited to meet the artists and view the artwork. Most of the works are for sale and may be purchased through the close of the exhibition.

Work by L. Bethsy Salage on the North Wall
Featuring floral paintings made with watercolors and metallic ink.

Terina Gillette: Temperance: An Expose of Emotion in the lower gallery
Terina Gillette resides in Knoxville. She works in a variety of media such as window painting, chalk art murals, traditional wall murals, working with acrylics, papers, pencils, and face & body painting. She publishes an International art magazine that highlights professional artists and students. The magazine has been sent to Belgium, Italy, Holland, and the UK. You will find Gillette teaching art to local home education students at her private studio as well as summer art camps at the Knoxville Museum of Art. She is a member of numerous associations nationwide and locally that promote and support arts and culture. Each weekend you can find her face painting unique and beautiful designs for public and private events around town. She is in her master’s program for psychology and recently graduated with a double Bachelors in psychology. She believes that art is an important venue for healing and enjoying life, and that art is the fullest expression of emotions.

A1LabArts: Open Show with Dada Inspiration: GODDESS/JAPAN/PEACE in the Balcony gallery
A1LabArts is dedicated to multi-disciplinary and experimental exploration of contemporary art issues in all media. Through events, workshops, shows and performances, A1LabArts aims to make connections in the community among artists of different ages, interests and backgrounds. They see art as a bridge between ideas and people and use their space in Emory Place as a catalyst to spark innovation and make connections. Their current membership includes 60 artists and is open to the public.

Mary Saylor: A Whimsical Nature in the display case
Mary Saylor has been fascinated by all sorts of artistic endeavors from her childhood and was raised by parents who themselves were creative individuals. She obtained a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from Ohio University with a minor in Sculpture and taught art in middle school for some time in Ohio. Over the years, she has dabbled in various creative outlets including drawing, quilting, painting, woodcarving and clay and recently has focused on paper mâché sculptures. Saylor has a profound love and appreciation of all animals, great and small, and this devotion is clearly seen in her whimsical, humorous animal sculptures.

Dick Wills: Celebrate Color in the Atrium
Dick Wills is an older adult with a broad background and many hobbies. A Chemical Engineer by training, he owns and operates a manufacturing company in West Knoxville. He plays over 20 instruments and is a member of his church music worship program. Wills frequents the gym and hikes as much as possible. Several times each year, he travels to the northwest to search for and excavate dinosaur fossils. His art is multimedia: he utilizes oil, acrylic, dye, watercolor and more for paper and tissue collages and canvas/other surfaces.

“Colors are full of joy and are therapeutic,” says Wills. “They attract the eye and lift the spirit. It is not so much what you see, but how you feel when you see it. Simple color and form can change your attitude and brighten your day in one look.”

The exhibitions are on display at the Emporium Center, 100 S. Gay Street, in downtown Knoxville. Exhibition hours are Monday-Friday, 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM. For more information, please contact the Arts & Culture Alliance at (865) 523-7543, or visit the Web site at www.knoxalliance.com.


Impressionists on display at KMA

(Knoxville, TN) – The Knoxville Museum of Art announces American Impressionism: The Lure of the Artists’ Colony from August 11 through November 12, 2017.

Drawn from the extensive collection of the Reading Public Museum, this vibrant exhibition examines the key role played by artists’ colonies in the development of American Impressionism. It features more than 50 paintings and works on paper by Frank W. Benson, Mary Cassatt, William Merritt Chase, Childe Hassam, Ernest Lawson, William Paxton, Robert Reid, Chauncey Ryder, John Twachtman, Julian Alden Weir, and many others.

Many of the nationally prominent artists represented in this exhibition have ties to East Tennessee and the KMA’s ongoing display Higher Ground: A Century of the Visual Arts in East Tennessee. More than a dozen participated in large art exhibitions held in conjunction with Knoxville’s 1910 and 1911 Appalachian Expositions, and the 1913 National Conservation Exposition. Their paintings appeared alongside those of several East Tennessee artists represented in Higher Ground, such as Catherine Wiley, Lloyd Branson, Adelia Lutz, Charles Krutch, and Hugh Tyler, to name a few. These sprawling and ambitious exhibitions were designed with the goal of bringing the “best contemporary art in America” to people of the region. The displays highlighted art currents of the day, and allowed East Tennessee artists to demonstrate their proficiency in a national context.

Among other ties, John F. Carlson served as a juror for the 1913 Expo art exhibition along with Knoxville impressionist painter Catherine Wiley. Robert Reid was one of Wiley’s art instructors during her studies in New York, and Mary Cassatt’s intimate domestic scenes inspired Wiley’s career-long interest in depicting women and children. As a result of these and other connections, this exhibition offers a broader national lens through which viewers can assess the work of Wiley, Branson, Lutz, Krutch, Tyler and other Higher Ground artists who also experimented with Impressionism.

Robert Reid (Stockbridge, Massachusetts 1862-1929 Clifton Springs, New York), Summer Breezes, ca. 1910-20. Oil on canvas, 33 ¾ x 39 inches, Reading Public Museum, Pennsylvania. Photo courtesy KMA.

The Knoxville Museum of Art celebrates the art and artists of East Tennessee, presents new art and new ideas, serves and educates diverse audiences, and enhances Knoxville’s quality of life. The museum is located in downtown Knoxville at 1050 World’s Fair Park and is open to the public Tuesday through Saturday 10am–5pm, and Sunday 1pm-5pm. Admission and parking are free. For more information, contact Angela Thomas at 865.934.2034 or visit www.knoxart.org.


Art Market seeks artists

Knoxville’s Art Market Gallery is currently accepting applications for a Sunday, August 27, 2017 membership jury. Acceptance for membership is determined by a jury of six active gallery members and is based on the quality of the applicant’s work; the applicant’s ability to be involved in a cooperative effort; as well as, the needs of the gallery.

Patrons enjoy visiting the Art Market Gallery in downtown Knoxville during a recent First Friday celebration, a city-wide event with open house opportunities at local businesses. Photo by Celebrate Knoxville.

Currently the gallery is accepting applications from artists in ​2D & 3D media​. Prospective members may deliver four pieces of their work and completed application form with $30 jury fee to the gallery at 422 South Gay Street in downtown Knoxville.

Delivery may be made 11:00 am – 5:30 pm Tuesday, August 22nd through Saturday, August 26th, 2017.

Instructions and an application form are available at www.artmarketgallery.net​.


Celebrate July 4th at Mabry-Hazen

Mabry-Hazen House will host its second annual Fourth of July Celebration on Tuesday, July 4th, 2017. On historic Mabry’s Hill attendees will enjoy a great view of the July 4th fireworks show, good food, and live music by Eli Fox. Tours of the historic home will begin at 6 pm, and dinner will be served at 7:30. Alcohol is BYOB.

Mabry-Hazen House offers food and entertainment without the traffic. Tickets are $60 per adult and children under 12 are free when accompanied by a ticket holder. Tickets are limited to 200 adults to ensure a quality event. Purchase your tickets in advance to guarantee your attendance. There is plenty of parking and the site offers easy access to I-40 without traffic concerns. Tickets may be purchased in advance by visiting www.mabryhazen.com or call 865-522-8661 for more information. The event will take place rain or shine. Tickets are non-refundable. Sponsored by WDVX, All Occasions Party Rentals, and Crowne Plaza Knoxville.

Built in 1858, Mabry-Hazen House is strategically located on the highest hill east of downtown Knoxville with spacious views in all directions. The home was occupied and defended by both armies during the Civil War. It housed three generations of the same family for 130 years, and the museum showcases one of the largest original family collections in America. Your attendance will help support the museum’s mission to preserve and educate the public about an important part of East Tennessee history.

Please call 865-522-8661 or visit www.mabryhazen.com for more information.


Shakespeare shows begin July 13

The Tennessee Stage Company presents its 27th summer Shakespeare Festival, featuring the comedies Two Gentlemen of Verona and The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged). The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged) opens the festival on Thursday, July 13, 2017 at Market Square. It continues through Aug. 12, alternating performances with Two Gentlemen of Verona which runs July 14 – Aug. 13.

Admission is free to the Market Square and Blount County Public Library performances.

The indoor matinees at the Scruffy City Hall are $15. A donation basket is passed at Market Square with a $ 10.00 suggested donation. Special VIP seating is available on the Square for $ 15.00.

THE TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA

July 13, 15, 21, 23, 27, 29, Aug. 4, 6, 10, 126

7:00 pm nightly outdoors on Market Square

What happens when a young man suddenly finds his best friend’s girlfriend more desirable than his own? Shakespeare’s refreshing comedy of first love is complete with wily servants, disguised lovers and Crab – the most lovable, ill mannered canine ever to grace the stage. Valentine and Proteus, the two gents in question, prove that Romeo was not the only young lad in Verona to fall in love! “What light is light, if Silvia be not seen/What joy is joy if Silvia be not by.”

THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (Abridged)

July 14, 16, 20, 22, 28, 30, Aug. 3, 5, 11, 13

7:00 pm nightly outdoors on Market Square

This is 37 Plays. Three Actors. 90 Minutes. The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged) is directed by H. Caitlin Corbitt and Two Gentlemen of Verona is directed by Amy Hubbard, founding Artistic Director of The Actor’s Co-Op.

For more information, call 865-546-4280 or e-mail tennesseestage@comcast.net

Shakespeare On The Square would not be possible without the support of the Tennessee Arts Commission, The Clayton Foundation, the CBID, the City of Knoxville and Knox County.


Museum of Appalachia hosts event

The Museum of Appalachia will once again celebrate Independence Day with an old fashioned “anvil shoot.” Every 4th of July, the Museum uses gunpowder to launch a 200-pound anvil hundreds of feet into the air. The anvil shoot is the centerpiece of a celebration that includes a bell-ringing ceremony, flag procession, old-fashioned games, music, and demonstrations from blacksmiths, beekeepers, patriotic re-enactors, and woodworkers. The Museum is also hosting a pie-baking contest; registration information and other details can be found at www.museumofappalachia.org.

“When the gunpowder ignites and the anvil soars into the air, the earth will literally shake,” says Museum President, Elaine Meyer. “The sound of the explosion can be heard for several miles.”

Anvil shoots were once a common way for pioneers to commemorate holidays, elections, and other special occasions. While the tradition of anvil-shooting is nearly obsolete, the Museum keeps a piece of history alive for a 21st century audience. Photo courtesy Museum of Appalachia.

July 4th anvil shoots are a nearly 30-year tradition for the Museum, but the event remains as exciting as ever. Garden & Gun magazine named the event the “Editors’ Choice” for “Goings-on in the South” in their June/July issue.

Anvil shoots are scheduled for 10:00 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 1:00 p.m., and 2:30 p.m.

The Museum is open from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., with special Independence Day activities from 10:00 a.m. until 3:00 p.m.

On this day, only, the Museum is offering a special family rate of $35. The event is free for Museum members. Tickets may be purchased at the Museum on the day of the event. For more information, visit the Museum’s website, or call 865-494-7680.


ACT presents Waiting for Godot

(Knoxville, Tenn.) – Director Holly Montgomery and All Campus Theatre present Samuel Beckett’s absurdly existential, existentially absurd Waiting for Godot. Performances are $15 general admission, $10 for students with ID.

Waiting for Godot tells the story of two men, Estragon and Vladimir, as they wait by a barren tree for the arrival of someone named Godot. While waiting, they quarrel, dance, contemplate suicide, eat, sleep, and discuss philosophy, religion, life, and death. As night draws near, they meet a Master and his Slave, and a young Boy claiming that he has been sent by Mr. Godot. When the same events take place the next day, the two men begin to question their existence and the inevitable futility of their wait for Godot, in what The NY World Telegram describes as “a portrait of the dogged resilience of a man’s spirit in the face of little hope.”

For more information about the Knoxville Performing Arts Exchange, Email carolyn@modernstudio.org or call (865) 776-2295.


Mabry-Hazen celebrates July 4th

Mabry-Hazen House will host its second annual Fourth of July Celebration on Tuesday, July 4, 2017. On historic Mabry’s Hill attendees will enjoy a great view of the July 4th fireworks show, good food, and live music by Eli Fox. Tours of the historic home will begin at 6pm, and dinner will be served at 7:30. Alcohol is BYOB.

Mabry-Hazen House offers food and entertainment without the traffic. Tickets are $60 per adult and children under 12 are free when accompanied by a ticket holder. Tickets are limited to 200 adults to ensure a quality event. Purchase your tickets in advance to guarantee your attendance. There is plenty of parking and the site offers easy access to I-40 without traffic concerns. Tickets may be purchased in advance by visiting www.mabryhazen.com or call 865-522-8661 for more information. The event will take place rain or shine. Tickets are non-refundable. Sponsored by WDVX, All Occasions Party Rentals, and Crowne Plaza Knoxville.

Built in 1858, Mabry-Hazen House is strategically located on the highest hill east of downtown Knoxville with spacious views in all directions. The home was occupied and defended by both armies during the Civil War. It housed three generations of the same family for 130 years, and the museum showcases one of the largest original family collections in America. Your attendance will help support the museum’s mission to preserve and educate the public about an important part of East Tennessee history.

Please call 865-522-8661 or visit www.mabryhazen.com for more information.


Knox Heritage names Fragile 15

The French Broad River corridor is among Knox Heritage’s recently announced 2017 list of the most endangered historic buildings and places in Knoxville and Knox County. The announcement took place at Knoxville High School, 101 E. Fifth Avenue.

Every May during National Preservation Month, Knox Heritage releases its list of the most endangered historic buildings and places in Knox County to inform the public and local leaders about the plight of significant historic resources. Often, the endangered buildings and places are representative of issues that endanger other centerpieces of our heritage across the community.

The historic places included on the list are selected by the Knox Heritage Board of Directors from nominations received from members of Knox Heritage and the general public. The list provides a work plan for the organization over the next 12 months. Preservation strategies are developed for each site on the list and can include working with current property owners, government officials, citizens and/or potential new owners to preserve these important parts of Knox County’s heritage. Knox Heritage is committed to acting as an advocate for the endangered properties. The community is invited to join in efforts to save endangered heritage through advocacy and action. To volunteer, please contact Knox Heritage at 523-8008 or info@knoxheritage.org.
2017 Fragile Fifteen

1. Standard Knitting Mill – 1400 Washington Avenue

2. Estabrook Hall – 1012 Estabrook Road

3. Knoxville College Historic District – 901 Knoxville College Drive

Representative Properties:

a. McKee Hall

b. Wallace Hall

c. Elnathan Hall

d. McMillan Chapel

e. Giffen Memorial Gymnasium

f. President’s House

4. Fort Sanders House & Grocery – 307 18th Street, 1802, 1804, & 1810 Highland Ave

5. Rule High School – 1901 Vermont Avenue

6. Sanitary Laundry – 625 N. Broadway

7. First Friends Church – 2100 Washington Avenue

8. The Eugenia Williams House – 4848 Lyons View Pike

9. Burlington Commercial District

10. Lucky Inn – 4625 Asheville Highway

11. The Sterchi Mansion/Stratford – 809 Dry Gap Pike

12. The Paul Howard House – 2921 N. Broadway

13. The Knaffl-Stephens House – 3738 Speedway Circle

14. Greyhound Bus Station – 100 E. Magnolia Avenue

15. French Broad River Corridor (pictured below)

Visit KnoxHeritage.org.


Gilded Age on display

KNOXVILLE—The McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, opens the new exhibition “Fish Forks and Fine Furnishings: Consumer Culture in the Gilded Age,” on May 26, 2017.

The American Gilded Age, defined in the exhibition as 1870-1900, saw rapid growth in mass manufacturing, trade and travel—all of which gave Americans greater access to, and interest in, goods from around the world.

From fish forks and fashionable dress to furniture and fine china, the exhibition explores the personal and household objects that served as visible symbols of wealth, power and social class. The 100-plus objects in the exhibit point to the great changes that were occurring in America at the time, and also to our continuing preoccupation with the objects we choose to buy, wear and display. Image: Three-piece Afternoon Dress, c. 1880s, American, maker unknown. Cotton, velvet, silk. Gift of G.P. Gaut, 1947. Photo courtesy McClung Museum.

“The period’s fixation on wearing the right dress or setting an elegant table is no different than today’s focus on having the right style for one’s home or consuming the right foods or status bag as dictated by Pinterest, celebrities or the thousands of lifestyle gurus that all seem to have blogs and personal brands,” said Catherine Shteynberg, museum assistant director. Shteynberg curated the exhibit with curatorial assistant Melinda Narro.

The exhibit will include an installation of Knoxville native Frederick Bonham’s parlor in the Plaza Hotel in New York City, period dress and accessories, an array of unusual serving utensils and a formal dining table arrangement, and imported goods from across the world. Objects were collected by area families and come from the McClung Museum’s permanent collections, the UT Special Collections Library and the Museum of East Tennessee History.

The McClung Museum is located at 1327 Circle Park Drive. Museum admission is free, and the museum’s hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to Saturday and 1 to 5 p.m. on Sundays. Groups may schedule tours by calling 865-974-2144 or emailing museum@utk.edu.

Free two-hour museum parking passes are available from the parking information booth at the entrance to Circle Park Drive on weekdays by request. Free parking is available on Circle Park Drive on a first-come, first-served basis on weekends. Free public transportation to the museum is also available via the Knoxville Trolley Vol Line.

For more information about the McClung Museum and its collections and exhibits, visit mcclungmuseum.utk.edu.


Historic sites celebrate Statehood Day

Knoxville, TN – June 1, 2017 marks the 221st anniversary of Tennessee’s admission as the 16th state in the union. East Tennessee’s most important cultural heritage sites are partnering to celebrate Statehood Day on Saturdays, May 27 and June 3, and Sundays, May 21 and May 28. The sites include places of historical significance in the exciting journey from the creation of our country to the founding of our state. The Historic Homes of Knoxville include: Blount Mansion, Crescent Bend, James White’s Fort, Mabry-Hazen House, Marble Springs, Ramsey House, and Historic Westwood. Each site will have individual ways of celebrating the birth of Tennessee. These are free museum days to the public.

Westwood (Sunday, May 21, 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM)
Built as a “wedding promise” in 1890 by John Edwin Lutz and his wife, Ann Adelia Armstrong Lutz, on property owned by her grandfather, Drury P. Armstrong. The highlight and most significant component of Westwood is the studio which was designed by Ann Adelia Armstrong Lutz, an accomplished artist. Today Historic Westwood is home to Knox Heritage and the East Tennessee Preservation Alliance. The home will be open for free tours. Parking available at Laurel Church of Christ. Address: 3425 Kingston Pike, Knoxville, TN 37919. Information: 865-523-8008, www.historicwestwood.org

Blount Mansion (Saturday, May 27, 10:00 AM – 2:00 PM)
Construction on Blount Mansion began in 1792. The restored mansion was open for tours in 1930, making it the oldest museum in Knox County. Commemorate the creation of the state of Tennessee and celebrate the pioneers who settled and transformed the southwest territory into the vibrant state of Tennessee. Hosting free admission. Address: 200 W. Hill Avenue, Knoxville, TN 37902. Information: 865-525-2375, www.blountmansion.org

James White’s Fort (Saturday, May 27, 10:00 AM – 3:00 PM)
Built in 1786, James White’s Fort was home to the founder of Knoxville. More than 10,000 visitors tour the Fort each year and experience the frontier lifestyle through hands-on interpretations. Tennesseans for Living History volunteers will be demonstrating the lifestyle of 1796: open hearth and fire pit cooking, weaving, spinning, and other pioneer era tasks. Free admission; donations gratefully accepted. Address: 205 E. Hill Ave, Knoxville, TN 37915. Information: 865-525-6514, www.jameswhitefort.org

Mabry-Hazen House (Saturday, May 27, 10:00 AM – 3:00 PM)
Built in 1858 and housing three generations of the same family from 1858-1987, the Mabry-Hazen House served as headquarters for both Union and Confederate forces during the Civil War. The Civil War, a gunfight on Gay Street in 1882, and a Breach of Promise lawsuit in the early 1930’s are only a few stories that bring life and color to a visit to the museum. Hosting free admission with living historians. Donations are appreciated. Address: 1711 Dandridge Avenue, Knoxville, TN, 37915. Information: 865-522-8661, www.mabryhazen.com

Marble Springs (Saturday, May 27, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM and Sunday, May 28, 11:00 – 4:00 PM)
Marble Springs was the home of John Sevier (1745-1815), Tennessee’s first governor and Revolutionary War hero. Marble Springs State Historic Site will commemorate Statehood Day with a living history weekend. Visitors are invited to experience 18th century demonstrations such as wood carving, spinning, and weaving; 18th century style militia drills; weapons demonstrations that will showcase period appropriate firearms; and much more. Details are subject to change. Free admission; donations gratefully accepted. Address: 1220 West Gov. John Sevier Highway, Knoxville, TN 37920. Information: 865-573-5508, www.marblesprings.net

Crescent Bend House & Gardens (Saturday, June 3, 9:00 AM – 1:00 PM)
Crescent Bend House & Gardens is one of the Southeast’s finest house museums and gardens. Built in 1834 by Drury Paine Armstrong, Crescent Bend was once a 900-acre working farm and so named for its prominent setting overlooking a majestic crescent bend in the Tennessee River just west of downtown Knoxville. Hosting free admission. Address: 2728 Kingston Pike Knoxville, TN 37919. Information: 865-637-3163, www.crescentbend.com

Ramsey House (Saturday, June 3, 12:00 PM – 3:00PM)
Ramsey House was built in 1797 by Knoxville’s first builder, Thomas Hope for Francis Alexander Ramsey, one of Knoxville’s first settlers. Celebrate Statehood Days with one of the founding Families of Knoxville. Ramsey House will host free tours until 3:00 PM, and visitors are invited to stay and enjoy a lively game of vintage baseball until 4:00 PM. Address: 2614 Thorngrove Pike, Knoxville, TN 37914. Information: 865-546-0745, www.ramseyhouse.org

In addition to the Historic Homes of Knoxville, Sequoyah Birthplace Museum (Vonore) and Crockett Tavern Museum (Morristown) will also host Statehood Day events on June 3.

Crockett Tavern Museum (Saturday, June 3, 11:00 AM – 5:00 PM)
The Museum was built on the site of the boyhood home of Davy Crockett. It is a reconstruction of the 1790’s John Crockett Tavern. Open with free admission. Address: 2002 Morningside Drive, Morristown, TN 37814. Information: 423-587-9900, www.crocketttavernmuseum.org

Sequoyah Birthplace Museum (Saturday, June 3, 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM)
The mission of the Sequoyah Birthplace Museum, a property of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, is to promote the understanding and appreciation of the history and culture of the Cherokee Indians in Eastern Tennessee, particularly the life and contributions of Sequoyah. The Museum will collect, preserve, interpret, and exhibit objects and data that support this mission. Free admission. Demonstrators will include corn husk dolls and other activities with living historians. Address: 576 HWY 360, Vonore, TN 37885. Information: 423-884-6246, www.sequoyahmuseum.org

About the Historic Homes of Knoxville
The Historic House Museums of Knoxville is a partnership that shares resources from each historic site in presenting the history, culture, and heritage of Knoxville and East Tennessee: www.hhknoxville.org


TN Smokies blast Biscuits

SEVIERVILLE, TENNESSEE – The Tennessee Smokies snapped their three game losing streak, thanks to hot bats early and solid pitching against the Montgomery Biscuits in a 7-1 victory on Tuesday afternoon.

Duane Underwood Jr. took the mound for the Smokies and ran into trouble in the second inning. The Biscuits had the bases loaded and one out, but Underwood would strand the runners on base by striking out the next two batters he faced to end the inning. Underwood Jr. would go five innings, giving up one run on five hits. The run came on a Grant Kay inside-the-park home run, a play that brought Charcer Burks out of the game after he slammed into the wall.

Offensively, Yasiel Balaguert got the scoring started in the bottom of the first inning with a three-run home run to left field that scored Andrew Ely and David Bote. Charcer Burks would add another three-run shot to left field, which scored Kevin Cornelius and Erick Castillo. Two batters later Bote would add a solo shot to put the Smokies up 7-0 at the end of two innings.

Daury Torrez would replace Underwood Jr. in the sixth inning, lasting three innings of two-hit baseball, and adding three strikeouts. Ryan McNeil would come on in the ninth to wrap things up, as the Smokies cruised to the 7-1 victory.

The Smokies return to action Wednesday as they finish up their series with the Montgomery Biscuits. Zach Hedges will get the start as he looks to get his sixth win in a row. Wednesday’s game will begin at 11:30 a.m. as part of a Smokies Health and Safety day.
ABOUT THE TENNESSEE SMOKIES

The Tennessee Smokies are the Double-A affiliate of the World Series Champion Chicago Cubs. Members of the ten-team Southern League, Smokies baseball has been entertaining families and fans of America’s national pastime in the East Tennessee region for over 100 years. To learn more about the Tennessee Smokies, visit www.smokiesbaseball.com


Family Fun Day at McClung Museum

KNOXVILLE—The McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, will host a free family fun day on Saturday, May 6, 2017, from 1 to 4 p.m.

The “Day of Clay” on May 6 will highlight the museum’s collection of ceramics by featuring clay objects from different cultures and time periods. Visitors will have the opportunity to work with clay and bring home their own work of art.

All materials will be provided and reservations are not necessary.

The McClung Museum is at 1327 Circle Park Drive. Museum admission is free, and the museum’s hours are 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Monday to Saturday and 1–5 p.m. Sundays. Free two-hour museum parking passes are available from the parking kiosk at the entrance to Circle Park Drive during the week. Free parking is available on the weekends. Free public transportation to the museum is available via the Knoxville Trolley Vol Line.


Farmers Market opens May 3

Beginning May 3, 2017, the Market Square Farmers Market will be open for business. This popular market has become for many an attraction and destination for finding fresh, local food. Every Wednesday and Saturday from May through November, rain or shine, you’ll find this open-air farmers’ market in the heart of Downtown Knoxville.

Everything at the market is grown or made by the vendor in the East Tennessee region. Products vary by season and include produce, eggs, honey, herbs, pasture-raised meat, bread, baked goods, salsas, coffee, artisan crafts, and more. Explore the daily map of vendor booths for each market or just come explore, taste some samples, and meet your friends and neighbors for a great day out in the Square.

Wednesdays
11am – 2pm

Saturdays
9am – 2pm

The Market Square Farmers market offers a variety of fresh, local foods grown and raised by East Tennessee farmers. The market is open rain or shine. Photo by Celebrate Knoxville.


Sheep Shearing Day at Museum

NORRIS, Tenn. –This Friday, from 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m., the Museum will host its second and final Sheep Shearing Day of the year. Students and families are invited to join the Museum as they welcome the warmth of spring by trimming the winter’s heavy growth of wool from their flock of sheep.

Last Friday, more than 1,000 students, parents, and teachers visited the Museum to celebrate a pioneer tradition.

Museum President, Elaine Meyer, said that this is the first year that the Museum is hosting two Sheep Shearing Days. Meyer said, “adding a second Sheep Shearing Day affords us the opportunity to share Appalachian history and culture with an even greater number of young people than ever before.”

The event will feature demonstrations of shearing, carding, spinning, weaving, and other ways that pioneers turned fleece into woven goods. Guests will also enjoy sheep herding, Appalachian music, an animal meet & greet, storytelling, and several historic demonstrations, including soap carving, beekeeping, sawmilling, blacksmithing, pioneer gardening, and dulcimer lessons.

Admission includes a tour of the Museum mountain farm and village, which contains some three-dozen historic log structures, exhibit halls filled with thousands of Appalachian artifacts, gardens, and free-range farm animals. For rates, go here: http://www.museumofappalachia.org/information/plan-your-visit/hours-and-admission.

School groups, homeschools, families, and individuals are all welcome to attend. Special student and group rates are available, and the event is free for Museum members. Groups of 20 or more, please call 865-494-7680 to make a reservation.

The Museum is located 16 miles north of Knoxville, one mile east of I-75, at Exit 122.

Visit MuseumofAppalachia.org.


Museum wins TAM President’s Award

The Museum of East Tennessee History was recently selected to receive the 2017 President’s Award, the highest project-based recognition presented by the Tennessee Association of Museums (TAM), for the Come to Make Records: Knoxville’s Contribution to American Popular Music exhibition.

This exhibit also won TAM Awards of Excellence in the categories of best temporary exhibition and audiovisual component for the introductory film produced by East Tennessee PBS. The President’s Award recipient is chosen from the top five scoring awards and the winner determined by the votes of the past presidents. The awards were presented at the recent Tennessee Association of Museums Conference held in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee.

Come to Make Records was organized by the East Tennessee Historical Society in partnership with the Knox County Public Library and the Tennessee Archive of Moving Image and Sound, a division of the Calvin M. McClung Historical Collection, as a temporary exhibition at the Museum of East Tennessee History and was on display April through October, 2016.

Visit www.eastTNhistory.org.


Punch Brothers to perform

KNOXVILLE, TN – This year’s Bijou Jubilee, presented by Pilot Flying J and supported by Four Roses Bourbon takes place Sunday, June 25, 2017 at 7:30 p.m. with a VIP pre-show party at 5:30 p.m.

Organizers says the Bijou is excited to welcome bluegrass band Punch Brothers back to the U.S. Cellular Stage as the featured artist for the 9th annual Bijou Jubilee. The public is invited to join in the festivities for a celebration of the historic Bijou Theatre, which serves as the primary fundraiser to support ongoing preservation and operations of this legendary venue.

There are two ticket options:
Reserved General Seating • $49.50
VIP Premier Seating & Pre-Show Party • $200

VIP tickets are limited and include access to the pre-show party at Club LeConte featuring heavy hors d’oeuvres, wine, beer and spirits, a silent auction, and live entertainment.

All ticket holders will have a chance to participate in our live auction featuring signed instruments and tour posters from artists who have played on the U.S. Cellular Stage at the Bijou Theatre. The live auction will take place immediately prior to Punch Brothers’ performance.

Tickets go on sale Friday, April 21 at 10am Eastern.

Bluegrass band Punch Brothers is Chris Thile (mandolin), Gabe Witcher (fiddle/violin), Noam Pikelny (banjo), Chris Eldridge (guitar), and Paul Kowert (bass). The band is scheduled to perform at the 9th annual Bijou Jubilee in Knoxville, Tennessee on June 25, 2017.


Marble City presents The Stronger

Marble City Opera presents: “The Stronger” by Hugo Weisgall on May 18-19, 2017 at 8pm at Holly’s Gourmet Market, 5107 Kingston Pike, Knoxville. Directed by Kathryn Frady Marvel; accompanied by Brandon Coffer, the opera stars Julia Metry as Estelle and Julia Metry and Denisha Miller as Lisa.

Following on the heels of an extremely successful run of the larger and more widely performed “La Traviata”, MCO returns to its chamber opera roots with a production of “The Stronger” by Hugo Weisgall. In this operatic adaptation of August Strindberg’s thought provoking one act, two actresses (Estelle and Lisa) meet by chance in a quiet uptown bar. It is revealed that the two women, once close friends, are now apparent romantic rivals thanks to the alleged philandering of Estelle’s husband Harold. Estelle jumps at the opportunity to vent the full fury of her frustrations at the woman whom she suspects to be her husband’s mistress and launches into an emotional tirade. Lisa however, stalwart and somewhat coy, weathers the onslaught and remains completely silent. Exerting her own (very) quiet power by refusing to either confirm or deny the many accusations being hurled her way. This subtle struggle for dominance between the two is the point of the entire work, and in Weisgall’s score the tension and raw emotion are masterfully woven together to form something intimate and beautiful. Though Estelle declares herself the victor by the piece’s end, the declaration rings hollow and the audience is left to decide for themselves which of the women is actually “the stronger.”

Tickets are $20 General Admission, and may be purchased either at the door or online.

There will be a special dinner menu available for the occasion and doors will open at 6:30pm for ticket holders to allow them a chance to partake before the show. Cost for the dinner is extra; dinner is not included in the ticket price.

Visit www.MarbleCityOpera.com/
Venue link: www.HollysEventfulDining.com
FB Event link: www.facebook.com/events/292775901151555/


New exhibit at Emporium Center

The Arts & Culture Alliance is pleased to present five new exhibitions at the Emporium Center in downtown Knoxville from May 5-26, 2017. A public reception will take place on Friday, May 5, 2017 from 5:00-9:00 PM to which the public is invited to meet the artists and view the artwork. Most of the works are for sale and may be purchased through the close of the exhibition.

The First Friday reception also features music and dance by Pasión Flamenca (led by Lucia Andronescu) in the Black Box at 6:00 PM and new music by the Domino quartet (Mike Baggetta – electric guitar; Keith Brown – drums; Jon Hamar – double bass; and Jorge Variego – composition, electronics and clarinets) at 8:00 PM. Complimentary hors d’oeuvres and chocolate fondue from the Melting Pot will be available.

Artwork by Carol Grant Stevens.
6 to 96: The Stevens Family in the lower gallery
Very few artists have been successful without the contributions of family, community and teachers. “6 to 96: The Stevens Family” is a group show consisting of artists from an extended family with ages ranging from six years old to 96 years old. Like the distance between six and 96, there is a spectrum of styles, perspectives, and experiences displayed. There is an inherent poetry created by the family unit. It is where one first learns to love, function, forgive and inspire. “6 to 96” is a show about the grace and beauty that emerges when immersed in a supportive creative environment.

Exhibiting artists include: Nate Butkus (drawing and mixed media); Ray Butkus (ceramist and jeweler); Virginia Butkus Gould (painter); Jonathan Grant (painter); Kathryn Lindsay Grant (painter); Allison Rae Nichols (painter); Carl Stevens (functional design); Carol Grant Stevens (painter); Charles Stevens (sculpture and jewelry); Connor Stevens (drawing); Mark Stevens (photography); Terry Stevens (painting); and William Stevens (painter and sculptor, deceased).

Luis Velázquez: Retrospective 1937-2016 and Family Continuity in the Balcony gallery
In this retrospective of Luis Velázquez, curated by Dina Ruta, the public will have the premiere opportunity to contemplate his artistic trajectory. Velázquez was born in Arecibo, Puerto Rico in 1937 and worked as a civil engineer, a community activist, and an artist who liked to paint landscapes and portraits. He used primarily oil, and all through his work, one can see his interest in landscapes. Every piece of art is a mirror that reveals his acute vision and is testimony to his perceptions, dreams and memories.

Reality, for Velázquez, was a single element and is reflected in his paintings. His technique was a calculated elaboration of the chromatic plane. His brush was free, his palette colorful, vibrant and full of light, and his scenes were always full of life. His favorite inspirational sites included Puerto Rico and the Smoky Mountains. Velázquez was the founder of the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of East Tennessee. He was committed to the Latino community, always ready to extend a friendly hand without the expectation of retribution; thus, earning much respect and love.

Julie Fawn Boisseau-Craig: Embodiment – A Search for Serenity in the display case
Artist Julie Fawn Boisseau-Craig works in porcelain and glass primarily but utilizes metals and wood as necessary to create her sculptural, wearable and or functional pieces. Her studio, Wild Pony Studio, is located in Rockford. She also works in hot glass at the Jackson County Green Energy Park in Dillsboro, North Carolina. She has shown nationally and participated in and taught many workshops and demonstrations. Boisseau-Craig received her MFA in 2012 and taught Introduction to Visual Art, 3D Art, Drawing and Ceramics at Western Carolina University. She also taught Drawing and Ceramics at Southwestern Community College in North Carolina. She was also an artist assistant to Tennessee-based glass artist Richard Jolley.

Her work directly responds to the contradictions and complexities of life. She strives to create beauty out of chaos. “I believe my work to be an ethereal commentary on the complicated fragility and contradictions of everyday life,” Boisseau-Craig says. For more information, please visit http://www.wildponystudio.com/.

Works by Heather Huebner on the North Wall
Heather Huebner was born in Euclid, OH and grew up in a suburb east of Cleveland. Her body of work is creating abstracted memories and/or thoughts of landscapes into paintings, influenced by growing up on Lake Erie. She is a graduate of The Cleveland Institute of Art with a Bachelors of Fine Arts focused in painting and is currently working in Knoxville.

“The first half of my work was done by using fluid materials and allowing them to dry over time, letting nature take its course upon the pigments,” says Huebner. “The process in which they are created – pouring onto the canvas – has the same effect as the fluidness of bodies of water on land or on a shoreline. Just as a puddle may sit for days and eventually evaporate, leaving some sediment behind, so too do these pigments. In viewing this body of work, one starts to question how those sediments were left behind. Were they an accident or were they intentional? For me, these marks create a personal connection to experiences I’ve had in the past. A unique mark or color or texture invokes the imagery of a landscape in my memory.”

The second half of Huebner’s work is fantasy. The shapes and colors and compositions have been determined by a feeling of unknowing and are structured on ideas of what could be rather than what she has seen in the past. For more information, please visit http://heatherhuebner.weebly.com/.

Stephen Spidell: Iterations of Movement in the Atrium
“Save yourselves from inquiring about the art’s potential of increasing your self-awareness or revealing any aspects of the human condition,” says Stephen Spidell. “My latest body of work exists merely for your aesthetic pleasure.” His charcoal and pastel drawings abstract human hair to create close-ups and landscapes. The emotive marks create waves and undulations that replicate the dynamism of the tress while contriving contrasts of value and texture.

Stephen Spidell currently resides in his hometown of Knoxville. His art education started at age seven when he trained under Janice Fancher, and he received his Associate of Arts in Studio Art from Pellissippi State. He is mainly known for his charcoal abstractions of hair, but he continues to indulge in other media including graphite, pen and ink, and pastel; his other subject matter includes botany and the human figure.

The exhibitions are on display at the Emporium Center, 100 S. Gay Street, in downtown Knoxville. Exhibition hours are Monday-Friday, 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Please note, the Emporium will be closed on Monday, May 29, for the holiday. For more information, please contact the Arts & Culture Alliance at (865) 523-7543, or visit the Web site at www.knoxalliance.com.


Art sale at Knoxville Museum of Art

The Guild of the Knoxville Museum of Art presents Artists on Location exhibition and art sale Saturday, April 29, 2017 from 6-8:30pm. This event is free and open to the public.

Local and regional artists have been invited to showcase their talent by producing work out of doors around Knoxville between April 26 and 29. The public is invited to watch as the artists paint around town. (Locations will be listed on knoxart.org in mid-April.) Artists will then exhibit and sell those works at the Awards Reception and Art Sale on Saturday, April 29.

North Carolina Artist Jim Carson is the Featured Artist and Juror for this year’s Artists on Location event. Carson has received a number of awards in both local and national shows, and gives workshops throughout the United States. Carson is known for his creative color balance and bold and expressive brushwork. He is a member of Plein Air Painters of the South East, an associate member of the Oil Painters of America, and a Signature Member of the American Impressionist Society.

Jim Carson, “Flowers in the Hamptons;” image courtesy Knoxville Museum of Art.

The Knoxville Museum of Art celebrates the art and artists of East Tennessee, presents new art and new ideas, serves and educates diverse audiences, and enhances Knoxville’s quality of life. The museum is located in downtown Knoxville at 1050 World’s Fair Park and is open to the public Tuesday through Saturday 10am–5pm, and Sunday 1pm-5pm. Admission and parking are free.

For more information, contact Angela Thomas at 865.934.2034 or visit www.knoxart.org.


Museum celebrates TN Marble

In conjunction with the feature exhibition Rock of Ages: East Tennessee’s Marble Industry  the Museum of East Tennessee History is inviting public participation in its ongoing efforts to study and document items made from marble quarried in East Tennessee, including  photographs, documents, and stories relating to marble history and workers. Anyone with relevant information is encouraged to bring these to a Tennessee Marble Documentation Day on Saturday, April 15, 2017 at the East Tennessee History Center, 601 S. Gay Street, Knoxville.

East Tennessee marble is prized by architects, builders, and sculptors for its structural and decorative properties. The marble industry was once an important sector of East Tennessee’s economy. By the mid-1850s, East Tennessee marble from Knox County had been chosen for the interiors of the Tennessee State Capitol and marble from Hawkins County was being installed inside the new House and Senate wings of the United States Capitol. In the decades that followed, East Tennessee’s varicolored marble was sought by architects for the interiors of a variety of public buildings: state capitol buildings, courthouses, city halls. Tennessee marble would soon also be ordered for high traffic railroad terminal flooring across the United States and Canada.

Reminders of the once prominent Tennessee marble industry can be seen today, in late 19th, early 20th century buildings on Gay Street and other corners of downtown, in building facades, steps and entranceways, and interior lobbies. The Knoxville Post Office and Federal Building on Main Street is a particularly fine example dating from the 1930s. And Knoxville, a city that has won national recognition for historic preservation, continues to embrace its marble heritage in modern buildings such as the expansion of the U.S. Custom House into the East Tennessee History Center and the exterior marble of the Knoxville Museum of Art.

The event is from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m., with a special panel discussion taking place from 10:30-11:30 a.m. The panel will feature Susan Knowles, Ph.D., of the Center of historic Preservation, Middle Tennessee State University, as moderator, as well as members of four families who were prominent in the marble business—Sonja Jones, Finbarr Saunders, Jean Vestal, and Beth Wolf, who will talk about their family’s experiences relating to the marble industry.

The program is free and open to the public. Visitors will also be invited to tour the museum for free and enjoy the Rock of Ages exhibition. The Museum of East Tennessee History is operated by the East Tennessee Historical Society and is located in the East Tennessee History Center at 601 S. Gay Street in downtown Knoxville. For further information, call (865) 215-8829 or visit www.eastTNhistory.org.

 


CBT announces season lineup

The Clarence Brown Theatre announces the lineup for the 2017/2018 Season, which includes two Tony-winning musicals, a classic play by Chekhov, a new CBT-commissioned drama, and the return of a holiday classic.

The season includes:

Peter and the Starcatcher
By: Rick Elice
Based on the novel by Dave Barry and Ridley Pearson
August 30 – September 17, 2017
Clarence Brown Theatre
“Absurdly entertaining!” Entertainment Weekly

In this multiple Tony Award-winning play with music, a dozen actors portraying more than 100 unforgettable roles take to the high seas to answer the century-old question: How did Peter Pan become The Boy Who Never Grew Up? This magical evening of madcap fun is suitable for younger audiences but most enjoyable for ages 10 and up.

Three Sisters
By: Anton Chekhov
New Version by Libby Appel
September 27 – October 15, 2017
Carousel Theatre
“If you are new to Chekhov, this version would be a marvelous introduction; for the repeat viewer, it may in some ways be a revelation.” The Five Points Star

Olga, Masha, and Irina struggle to let go of their past and to shape their future. A domineering sister-in-law, romance, soldiers, and money challenge the Prozorov family’s happiness and unity. With artful depiction of three very different women, Chekhov fascinates audiences with his deeply sensitive observations on life’s struggles.

Blue Window
By: Craig Lucas
October 25 – November 12, 2017
Lab Theatre
A long running Off-Broadway hit by the playwright of Reckless and God’s Heart.
A portrait of loneliness in one of the world’s most densely populated cities. Libby, for her own private reasons, has invited six disparate friends to her apartment in New York for dinner and drinks. As their conversations drift, they begin to open up to one another…but how do you really know anyone?

A Christmas Carol
November 22 – December 17, 2017
By: Charles Dickens
Adapted by: Edward Morgan and Joe Hanreddy
Clarence Brown Theatre
“If you like Christmas, do not humbug this play.” Knoxville News Sentinel

Our spectacular, heart-warming version of Dickens’ classic tale of redemption returns. Filled with traditional carols, stunning costumes, a gorgeous set and memorable characters, it’s guaranteed to enrich the holiday season for you and your family.

Alabama Story
January 31 – February 18, 2018
By: Kenneth Jones
Clarence Brown Theatre
“Dynamic! Rich! Impressive! Cleverly crafted! Articulate! Razor-sharp!” Salt Lake Tribune

A gentle children’s book with an apparent hidden message stirs the passions of a segregationist senator and a no-nonsense state librarian in 1959 Montgomery, just as the Civil Rights Movement is flowering. Inspired by true events, Alabama Story puts politicians, star-crossed childhood friends, and one feisty author in a struggle for the soul of the Deep South.

the strangers
By: christopher oscar peña
February 21 – March 11, 2018
Carousel Theatre
Transcending 20th-century notions of race and culture, peña’s work succeeds in simultaneously touching our hearts, stimulating our minds, and examining our society.
Tony Award-winning playwright David Henry Hwang

In this CBT-commissioned World Premiere, Cris returns to a place he once used to know, only to find a world he no longer recognizes. As he connects with a new stranger tasked to show him around town, an unexpected spark challenges all of Cris’ preconceived notions. the strangers is a modern day reimagining of Thornton Wilder’s Our Town, depicting a contemporary American world thrown into chaos.
This production contains adult content and language.

Dream of the Burning Boy
By: David West Read
March 28 – April 15, 2018
Lab Theatre
“…eloquent, affecting…moving.” The New York Times

Since the death of his favorite student, Larry Morrow, a fifty-something high school teacher, has been falling asleep at his desk and dreaming. The student’s sister and his friends find little solace in schoolwork. And the school’s guidance counselor keeps hanging inspirational slogans on the walls to help everyone “process their emotions.” A bittersweet story of finding the way and strength to move on.
This production contains mature language and themes.

Urinetown, the Musical
Music and Lyrics by Mark Hollman
Book and Lyrics by Greg Kotis
April 18 – May 6, 2018
Clarence Brown Theatre
“For anarchic, first-rate comic relief, get thee to Urinetown.” Time Out New York

A water shortage caused by a 20-year drought has led to a government-enforced ban on private toilets. Citizens must use public amenities, regulated by a single malevolent company that profits by charging admission. Deciding he has had enough, a hero plans a revolution!

Winner of three Tony Awards, three Outer Critics Circle Awards, two Lucille Lortel Awards and two Obie Awards, this hilarious musical is a satire of capitalism, populism, bureaucracy, corporate mismanagement, politics, greed, and the musical theatre!

Current corporate sponsors include Mainstage Series Sponsor Schaad Companies, Merchant & Gould, the Clayton Foundation, Pilot Flying J, Swofford Financial, Rotary Club of Knoxville, Stowers Machinery Corporation and UT Federal Credit Union. Current media sponsors include WBIR, B97.5 and The Daily Beacon.

With a dual mission to train the next generation of theatre artists and to provide top quality professional theatre, the Clarence Brown Theatre at the University of Tennessee Knoxville is one of only 13 academic LORT (League of Resident Theatre) institutions in the nation. Under the leadership of Producing Artistic Director Calvin MacLean and Managing Director David B. Byrd, the CBT season runs from September through May and features eight productions ranging from musicals to drama.

For more information, tickets or accessibility accommodation requests including Open Captioning, ASL, and assistive technologies, please call the CBT Box Office at 865-974-5161 or visit us online at clarencebrowntheatre.com/access. Stay Connected to the Clarence Brown Theatre on Facebook (Clarence Brown Theatre), follow us on Twitter (@ClarenceBrown) (#CBT1718Season) and view Clarence Brown videos on YouTube (Clarence Bro).


Marble Springs to celebrate Arbor Day

In recognition of Arbor Day, Marble Springs Historic Site, 1220 West Governor John Sevier Highway, will host a Tree Planting Celebration on April 8, 2017 starting at 10:00 am. Participants will first learn how to properly plant and label saplings to meet arboretum qualifications as set by the Tennessee Urban Forestry Council. Afterwards, participants can help plant the 60th tree in recognition of Marble Springs reaching a level 2 Arboretum.

Lunch will be provided for those helping plant the celebratory tree and take place at noon. Guest speaker, Tom Simpson, the Region Urban Forester with the Tennessee Department of Agriculture, will provide a lecture on The Importance of Urban Foresty at about 1:00 pm. The Marble Springs Arboretum will be open for self-guided tours throughout the event with a guided tour scheduled at about 2 pm. Children can also participate in Earth Day themed crafts throughout the event.

Please confirm your attendance at info@marblesprings.net or by calling (865) 573-5508. This event is free. Donations are appreciated with all proceeds going towards grounds maintenance and educational programming at Marble Springs.

For more information please visit www.marblesprings.net, call (865) 573-5508, or email info@marblesprings.net.


Circus comes to Knoxville

KNOXVILLE – The Garden Brothers Circus brings motorcycle stunts, acrobats and aerialists, clowns and live animals for a family-friendly show at the Knoxville Civic Coliseum on Monday, Feb. 27, 2017 at 4:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.

The Gardens Brothers Circus originated in Canada and has performed for more than 100 years. The circus is a family-owned business, which is now in its fourth generation of operations.

“We’ve pulled out all the stops for the celebration of our 100 years of entertaining families,” said Jim Davis, director of booking. “We have it all from acrobats and motorcyclists to elephants and llamas. Everyone becomes a kid again at the circus and creates long-lasting family memories.”

The performers include Chinese acrobats, a human slingshot, showgirls, clowns and motorcycle stunt artists. Among its live animals, Garden Brothers Circus is one of the last to showcase elephants in its show, as well as dogs and racing camels.

The show lasts approximately an hour and a half. Beginning an hour prior to the show, pony rides, elephant rides and camel rides will be available.

General admission tickets are on sale now at www.gardenbroscircus.com. The first 100 adult tickets purchased online are $9.95.

Ticket costs are: $8 for children, ages 3-12, and $24 for adults in general seating; and $18 for children and $24 for adults in VIP ringside seating. Children ages 2 and under are admitted free unless seated in the VIP section.

Free tickets for children will be distributed in the community at several locations, including elementary schools, day care centers, fast food eateries, convenience stores, community centers, churches and area merchants.

The Knoxville Civic Auditorium and Coliseum is conveniently located near the junction of Interstates 75 and 40 and sits downtown near the University of Tennessee campus. The facility attracts more than 250,000 people per year through a wide array of events, including Knoxville Ice Bears hockey games and the Knoxville Symphony Orchestra Pops Series. The facility includes a 6,500-capacity coliseum with 22,000-square- feet of exhibit space; 2,500-capacity auditorium; 10,000-square- foot exhibit hall; 4,800-square- foot ballroom; and a natural lawn amphitheater with a capacity of 10,000.


Open House at Lloyd Branson home

Knoxville, TN – Knox Heritage will be hosting an open house at the recently renovated Branson House, former residence of acclaimed Knoxville artist Enoch Lloyd Branson, on Saturday, February 18, 2017 from 10AM to 2PM. The house is located at 1423 Branson Avenue in North Knoxville.

Built in 1922, the culturally significant Lloyd Branson House had been declared blighted by the City of Knoxville and included in the annual Knox Heritage Fragile Fifteen list of endangered historic places. After an initial design concept by Brian Pittman and two-year renovation by High Oaks Construction, the three bedroom, three bath house is ready for its new homeowners.

The renovation of the historic house was made possible by generous grants and donations from 1772 Foundation, City of Knoxville Preservation Fund, The Lloyd Branson Family, Chapman Family Foundation, Valspar and the National Trust for Historic Preservation, Scripps/HGTV, Modern Supply, Ferguson Plumbing, Knox Heritage Vintage Properties Committee and SESCO Lighting.

Knox Heritage was able to purchase the home through the City of Knoxville’s Homemaker program which seeks buyers for properties needing significant renovation. Initial funding came through the organization’s J. Allen Smith Endangered Properties Fund.

For more information about this event visit www.knoxheritage.org.

About Lloyd Branson

Enoch Lloyd Branson (1853–1925) was best known for his portraits of Southern politicians and depictions of early East Tennessee history. One of the most influential figures in Knoxville’s early art circles, Mr. Branson was a mentor to fellow Knoxville artist Catherine Wiley and is credited with discovering twentieth-century portraitist Beauford Delaney. He operated a popular portrait shop with photographer Frank McCrary on Gay Street and is responsible for the development of the neighborhood in which this home is located, serving as the planner and builder for many homes on the street. Originally named Rhode Island Avenue, the street name was changed to Branson Avenue by the City of Knoxville to recognize his cultural contributions.

About Knox Heritage

Knox Heritage works to preserve the structures and places with historic or cultural significance in Knox County, Tennessee. Established in 1974 as a non-profit historic preservation organization, Knox Heritage is chartered by the state of Tennessee and governed by a board of directors representing all areas of our community. Knox Heritage is the only organization in the region that works every day to protect our treasured structures and places. Without Knox Heritage, many of our important buildings, along with the history and charm of the area, would have been demolished.

Knox Heritage carries out its mission through a variety of programs and encourages community support through education and advocacy. Membership in the organization is by annual dues, which are tax deductible, and is open to all individuals, businesses, and organizations recognizing the foresight of historical preservation.


Daniel Tosh at Knox Civic April 21

Knoxville , TN –Daniel Tosh and special guests will be appearing at Knoxville Civic Coliseum on Friday, April 21, 2017 for one night only. The appearance is part of Tosh’s “Tosh.Show On Campus Tour,” which travels to college towns like Knoxville where the University of Tennessee is located.

“Tosh.0” currently airs on Tuesday nights at 10 p.m. ET/PT on Comedy Central. Daniel Tosh will host and perform an evening of standup comedy featuring writers and comedians from his Comedy Central show “Tosh.0.”

Tickets are $ 75, $59.50 and $45.00 for reserved seating, and go on sale Friday, February 17 at 10 a.m. Tickets can be purchased at Livenation.com, knoxvilletickets.com, the Knoxville Civic Coliseum Box office or charge by phone at (865) 656-4444 or any Knoxville Tickets outlet locations

All tickets subject to applicable service charges and fees. Dates and times subject to change without notice.


CBT presents The Busy Body

KNOXVILLE, TN – A fast-paced farce packed with memorable characters, “The Busy Body” runs in the Clarence Brown Theatre’s Carousel Theatre February 22 – March 12, 2017. In this comedy, a young woman, her handsome lover, and their friends plot to escape a controlling guardian. Will a nosey nobleman ruin the plan or save the day?

Charlotte Munson as Miranda in the CBT’s “The Busy Body.”  The play was written by Susanna Centlivre in 1709, with adaptations by UT Faculty Misty Anderson and John Sipes. Photo Liz Aaron.

A Pay What You Wish Preview performance, where patrons can name their own price, will be held Wednesday, February 22 from Noon to 7 pm at the theatre. A Talk Back with the actors will take place Sunday, March 5 following the matinee. A panel discussion in association with the Commission for Women will take place on March 9 at 3:30 pm in the Carousel Theatre. The Open Captioned performance is Sunday, March 12 at 2:00 pm.

According to Restoration scholar Anderson, Centlivre’s comedy was the most popular play written by a woman in the eighteenth century and among the 10 most popular plays of the entire period. Audiences in Charleston, Williamsburg, Baltimore, New York, and other colonial theatre towns in the early days of America flocked to it. It even played in Havana and Kingston, Jamaica! The play’s pace calls for the kind of physical comedy one might have seen on “The Carol Burnett Show.”

“The Busy Body” gives us a window into the world of marriage at a time when women’s roles were just beginning to change, and playwrights like Centlivre were beginning to see women as equals to men. Manners and codes of conduct required curtsies, bows, and polite forms of address, but marriage contracts were also big business.
The two heroines struggle against arrangements that would turn them into mere goods traded between men using secret identities, tricks, messages in code, and helpful waiting maids. The results are hilarious and surprisingly modern; the young women are frank, spunky, and unstoppable, and their lovers seem to love them all the more for it.

Free and convenient parking is available in the McClung Tower Garage on Volunteer Boulevard.


Ancient Egyptian cats at McClung

KNOXVILLE—The McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, opens the new exhibition “Divine Felines: Cats of Ancient Egypt” on Saturday, Feb. 4, 2017.

From domesticated cats to mythic symbols of divinities, felines played an important role in ancient Egyptian imagery for thousands of years. Now, 80 items from the Egyptian holdings of the Brooklyn Museum will be on view in “Divine Felines” at the museum through May 7, 2017. Stela with the Gods Bes and Tutu, 332-30 B.C.E.. Limestone, Brooklyn Museum. Charles Edwin Wilbour Fund. Image courtesy McClung Museum.

Likely first domesticated in ancient Egypt, cats were revered for their fertility and valued for their ability to protect homes and granaries from vermin. But felines were also associated with royalty and deities. Combining a lion’s body and a king’s head, sphinxes guarded temple entrances and provided protection as temple objects. The ferocious goddess Sakhmet, depicted as a lioness or lion-headed woman, and the goddess Bastet, represented as a cat or a cat-headed woman, together symbolized the duality of feline nature — caring yet dangerous. The male leonine gods Bes and Tutu were popularly worshiped as protectors of fertility, health and fortune.

Exhibition programming, all free and open to the public, also will include:

A lecture on mummification in ancient Egypt by scholar Bob Brier, co-sponsored by the East Tennessee Society of the Archaeological Institute of America, at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 21.

Two free family fun days—”Purrs from the Past,” 1–4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 25, and “To Kitties’ Health,” 1­–4 p.m. Saturday, March 25.

A stroller tour for caregivers and infants through four-year-olds, “Kitties and Toddlers,” at 10 a.m. Monday, Feb. 27.

A lecture on cat behavior by Julie Albright from UT’s School of Veterinary Medicine at 2 p.m. Sunday, March 19.
“Divine Felines” is organized by the Brooklyn Museum and Yekaterina Barbash, associate curator of Egyptian Art at the Brooklyn Museum.

The exhibition is presented by the Elaine A. Evans Museum Fund, Aletha and Clayton Brodine Museum Fund, the First Tennessee Foundation, UT Ready for the World, Audrey Duncan, Wahid and Samia Hanna, the Archaeological Institute of America, the UT College of Veterinary Medicine and the Arab American Club of Knoxville. Additional support is provided by Knox County, the City of Knoxville, and the Arts and Heritage Fund.

The McClung Museum is at 1327 Circle Park Drive. Museum admission is free, and the museum’s hours are 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Monday to Saturday and 1–5 p.m. Sundays. Groups may schedule tours by calling 865-974-2144 or emailing museum@utk.edu. Free two-hour museum parking passes are available from the parking information building at the entrance to Circle Park Drive on weekdays by request. Free parking is available on Circle Park Drive on a first-come, first-served basis on weekends. Free public transportation to the museum is also available via the Knoxville Trolley Vol Line.


Outside Mullingar at CBT

The Clarence Brown Theatre kicks off the second half of the season with John Patrick Shanley’s Tony Award-nominated romantic comedy, “Outside Mullingar” February 1-19, 2017 on the CBT mainstage.

A Pay What You Wish Preview performance, where patrons can name their own price, will be held Wednesday, February 1 from Noon to 7 pm at the theatre. A Talk Back with the actors will take place Sunday, February 12 following the matinee. The Open Captioned performance is Sunday, February 19 at 2:00 pm. Free and convenient parking is available in the McClung Tower Garage on Volunteer Boulevard.

Katie Cunningham and Richard Price star in “Outside Mullingar” with the Clarence Brown Theatre in downtown Knoxville. Filled with beautiful language and set in the rural hills of Ireland, “Outside Mullingar” is a romantic comedy that reminds us that — early or late — love always arrives on time. Farmers Anthony and Rosemary are clueless when it comes to love. To find it, they will have to overcome a land feud, family rivalries, and their own fears about romance. Photo: Elizabeth Aaron.

The author of more than 23 plays, Shanley won the Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award for his play, “Doubt,” and an Oscar for his screenplay, “Moonstruck.” Called an “Irish Moonstruck,” “Outside Mullingar” was nominated for a Tony Award for Best Play, two Outer Circle Critics Awards and two Drama Desk Awards.

The Preview for “Outside Mullingar” is Wednesday, February 1 followed by Opening Night Friday, February 3. The production runs through February 19. UT faculty/staff, senior citizens, children and students receive discounts. The Clarence Brown Theatre only sells tickets online through Knoxville Tickets.

For tickets, call the Clarence Brown Theatre Box Office at 865-974-5161 or order online 24/7 at www.clarencebrowntheatre.com


Found Objects at TN Stage Company

Does the truth always set us free? When a mother and daughter attempt to deal with the accidental death of their son/brother, the truth may indeed stand in the way of their healing. Those are the questions raised when the Tennessee Stage Company presents its 20th Annual New Play Festival and World Premiere Production of Marilynn Barner Anselmi’s play, Found Objects.

Marilynn Barner Anselmi says she is an accidental southerner and playwright. Born in Holt, Michigan, after close to three decades in North Carolina, she has almost attained the status of southerner. She has full length and a handful of short scripts which have been presented in fourteen states across the country. Performances include MT Works, Pride Films and Plays, Detroit Repertory Theatre, Kennedy’s Theatre, The Studio Theatre, Atta Girl Productions, Script2Stage2Screen, National Black Theatre Conference, and Tennessee Stage Company, among others.

Performances are February 3-12, 2017, at 8 p.m. at the Historic Southern Railway Station. There will be matinee performances Sunday afternoons at 3:00 pm.

Tickets are on sale now. Call (865) 546-4280 for tickets and reservations.

General Admission is $15.00

The New Play Festival is made possible in part by the support of the Tennessee Arts Commission and the Arts and Culture Alliance and is a proud participant in the Penny For The Arts Program.


New art exhibits at Emporium

The Arts & Culture Alliance is pleased to present four new exhibitions at the Emporium Center in downtown Knoxville from February 3-24, 2017. A public reception will take place on Friday, February 3, from 5:00-9:00 PM to which the public is invited to meet the artists and view the artwork. Most of the works are for sale and may be purchased through the close of the exhibition. Complimentary hors d’oeuvres and catering by Zoës Kitchen will be available.

The Slovene Independent Biennial in the lower gallery showcases contemporary graphic illustration in Slovenia. The more than 50 artists on display are alumni of the Independent Biennial and have won multiple national and international awards and grants for their work. Slovenia, a member of the European Union, is located in Central Europe at the northern tip of the Adriatic Sea. Image courtesy Independent Biennial.

National Juried Exhibition of 2017 in the Balcony gallery
The Arts & Culture Alliance is pleased to present its eleventh annual National Juried Exhibition, a new exhibition featuring selected works from 45 artists throughout the United States. Exhibiting artists include: John Anderson, Mark Bender, Eric Buechel, Rebecca J. Buglio, Genevieve Byrd, Bill Cook, Jr., C Y Cooper, Yvonne Dalschen, Claudia Dean, Khoa Dang Dinh, Roger Fleenor, Gordon Fowler, Michael E. Galyon, William Goolsby, Nina Hardison, Ann Harwell, Chasidy Hathorn, Todd Johnson, Perry Johnson, Pat Kumicich, Vickie Kallies Lee, Brandon Lutterman, Benjamin Madeska, Michael Murphy, Julie Oglesby, Clay Pardue, Christen Parker, Amber Patty, Manya Pirkle, Jose Roberto, Chris S. Rohwer, Mark Runge, Mary Saylor, Byeol Shim, Nancy Stalls, Sam Stapleton, Jessica Stewart, Denise Stewart-Sanabria, Dale Sumner, Cheryl Tarrant, Keith Thomson, Marilyn Avery Turner, Ken Van Dyne, Katherine Wagner, and Marianne Woodside.

Through My Eyes: Works by Derrick Freeman, an Autistic Artist in the display case
Derrick Freeman resides in Knoxville and is a 26-year old young man who, at the age of two years old, was diagnosed with autism. Soon after his diagnosis he stopped talking. By the age of three, he began to draw. Over the years, Derrick has exhibited his art at the Vanderbilt Kennedy Center, the Tennessee Disability Mega Conference, the Art Fair of Madisonville, Very Special Arts (VSA) of Tennessee, Knoxville Museum of Art, East Tennessee Historical Society, Blount Mansion, Davis Art Studio, Beck Cultural Exchange Center and Wilbur N. Daniel African American Cultural Center at Austin Peay State University.

“Travel… Begins Close to Home” by Cheryl Sharp the Atrium
“The devastating fires in Gatlinburg and the Great Smoky Mountains National Park have reminded me of how precious our natural resources and historic structures are and how quickly they can be taken from us,” says Cheryl Sharp. Her exhibition will feature several images in Cades Cove and the Great Smoky Mountains National Park reflecting the different seasons of the park, as well as images from the Knoxville area.

The exhibitions are on display at the Emporium Center, 100 S. Gay Street, in downtown Knoxville. Exhibition hours are Monday-Friday, 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM. For more information, please contact the Arts & Culture Alliance at (865) 523-7543, or visit the Web site at www.knoxalliance.com.


Sara Evans at Knox Civic Feb 2

Country music recording artist Sara Evans will be performing hit song after hit song at the Knoxville Civic Auditorium Thursday, February 2, 2017, at 7:30 p.m.

Tickets are on sale now and the performance is presented by Big Spring Entertainment. Patrons will enjoy the live performances of songs like: Born To Fly, A Little Bit Stronger, I Could Not Ask for More, My Heart Can’t Tell You No, Suds in the Bucket, and more.

Since emerging in the late 1990s, Evans has had a prolific recording career that has seen the sale of more than 6 million albums. She’s had five #1 songs, four others appearing in the Top 10, two #1 Billboard Country Albums, five appearing on Billboard’s Top 200 all-genre chart and four consecutive RIAA certified Gold, Platinum or Multi-Platinum albums. She’s received awards from the Country Music Association, Academy of Country Music, Billboard Music Award and has garnered nominations for Grammy Awards (2), American Country Awards (10) and CMT Music Awards (5).

Sara Evans won the hearts of America as the first country artist to compete in ABC’s Dancing with the Stars. And she was chosen as one of People Magazine’s “50 Most Beautiful People.”

The Knoxville Civic Auditorium is located at 500 Howard Baker Jr Blvd, Knoxville, TN 37915.

Ticket prices are $66.95, $46.95, and $36.95. Additional entertainment fees may apply.

Visit knoxvillecoliseum.com.


Muse Knoxville hosts NYE event

KNOXVILLE, TN – The Muse Knoxville is hosting its 3rd annual Cheer In the New Year at Noon event from 10 am to 2 pm on New Year’s Eve at 516 N. Beaman Street.

This family friendly celebration offers all the traditions of a New Year’s Eve celebration with a bedtime that is more suitable for kids!  Party goers can get their picture taken in the photo booth, participate in educational activities and crafts throughout the building, enjoy refreshments provided by Kroger in the party room, and countdown to the new year at noon complete with a ball-drop, confetti and balloons!  The event is also sponsored by Baby+Company who will be on-site with an area for nursing mothers.

“We love the easy-going and celebratory pace of this event.  Cheer In The New Year is perfect for families to enjoy the traditions of ringing in the new year together without compromising that important bedtime,” says Ellie Kittrell, Executive Director, The Muse Knoxville.

This special event is open to ticket holders only and tickets are limited.  Tickets are available online at www.themuseknoxville.org for $12.50 ($10 for members), under 2 FREE.

The Muse Knoxville is a non-profit children’s science museum located in Historical Chilhowee Park at 516 N. Beaman Street.

Baby+Company is a modern birth center run by Certified Nurse-Midwives offering highly personalized well woman, maternity, and labor and birth care as well as wellness, childbirth and early parenting classes. Baby+Company’s evidence based care is focused on women and their families.

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Winter Princesses visit Zoo Knoxville

Zoo Knoxville is celebrating the holiday break with a unique and magical visit from Neverland and Company’s Snow Queen and Snow Princess. The zoo’s Wonderfully Winter Princesses event will take place on Tuesday, Dec. 27, 2016, from 10:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m.

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The Snow Queen and the Snow Princess, along with famous friend Beauty, will be greeting visitors in the zoo’s cozy Winter Village, located in the enclosed and heated Kids Cove tent. The regal visitors will be available for photos and to meet their majestic guests, who are encouraged to dress as their favorite fairy tale characters.

The Wonderfully Winter Princesses event is included with general zoo admission and free for Zoo Knoxville members. The zoo is currently offering buy one, get one free tickets during Kroger BOGO Days through Feb. 28, 2017.

Zoo Knoxville is a nonprofit entity situated on 53 wooded acres just east of downtown Knoxville. Zoo Knoxville features exhibits of wild animals in natural habitats and is world renowned for its efforts in conservation and species survival. Zoo Knoxville is nationally accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) and is committed to the highest standards in animal care and well-being, ethics, conservation, and education.

Knoxville’s largest attraction, the zoo is open every day except Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. Currently, the zoo is open from 10:00 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. daily. Admission and ticket sales stop one-hour before the zoo closes. For more information visit zooknoxville.org.


IJAMS opens new adaptive dock

Great news for sports lovers who have physical challenges! This month Ijams, the City of Knoxville, and Catalyst Sports celebrated the opening of a new adaptive dock at the Ijams River Landing on the Tennessee River.

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In addition to expanding paddling opportunities, the dock is the first step in Ijams offering adaptive recreation for individuals with physical challenges. Ijams plans to partner with Catalyst Sports to offer adaptive paddling programs in 2017. The nature center also recently purchased two adaptive kayaks.

The dock is free and open to the public. Motorized watercraft are not permitted. Future plans for the River Landing include new space for environmental education programs, as well as paddling rentals for those who do not have their own boards or boats.

In addition, Mead’s Quarry at Ijams has a creative new place visitors to lock up a bike or take a seat. The new bike racks and benches, created by artist Derek White of Bird on the Wire Studios, pay homage to the industrial history of the Ijams Quarries. White, along with the help of Ijams staff members, Ben Nanny and Jack Gress, and community members Kelly Brown, Gregory Tune, Claude Hardy, Duke Brown, and Noel Kuck, installed the one-of-a-kind gear-and-cog design near Mead’s Quarry Lake on Dec. 19, 2016.

 


Knox Civic hosts 90s Tour

Following early sold out shows and mounting demand from fans, “I LOVE THE ‘90s TOUR” has added more tour dates, including a performance in Knoxville. The once-in- a-lifetime lineup comes together for a nostalgia-driven blast from the past and now comes to the Knoxville Civic Coliseum on Thursday, April 6, 2017, at 7:30 p.m.

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The inaugural edition of “I Love The ‘90s Tour” invites Knoxville fans to reminisce about the trend-setting decade with some of the most iconic, indelible names in rap, hip hop and R&B, featuring Salt N Pepa, All 4 One, Coolio, Tone LOC, Color Me Badd, Rob Base and Young MC.

The Kansas City Star describes this 90s tour: “It was a satellite radio station come to life. It was the ultimate Throwback Thursday. It was a dance party filled with joyous Gen-Xers doing the ‘Funky Cold Medina’; in a ‘Gangsta’s Paradise’; and showing they could still ‘Push It, Push it real good.’ The crowd included many groups of girlfriends, some dressed up in era-appropriate overalls, neon shoes, gold chains and caps turned backward. They danced and screamed when they heard songs they recognized, and they heard many songs they recognized. -Kansas City Star

The Knoxville Civic Auditorium and Coliseum is conveniently located near the junction of Interstates 75 and 40 and sits downtown near the University of Tennessee campus. The facility attracts more than 250,000 people per year through a wide array of events, including Knoxville Ice Bears hockey games and the Knoxville Symphony Orchestra Pops Series. The facility includes a 6,500-capacity coliseum with 22,000-square- feet of exhibit space; 2,500-capacity auditorium; 10,000-square- foot exhibit hall; 4,800-square- foot ballroom; and a natural lawn amphitheater with a capacity of 10,000.

Tickets are now on sale at the Knoxville Civic Coliseum box office, charge by phone by calling 865-656- 4444 or 877-995- 9961 or online at KnoxvilleTickets.com. Reserved seating is $40, $55, $70 and $100. Applicable fees may apply.


New exhibits at The Emporium

The Arts & Culture Alliance is pleased to present three new exhibitions at the Emporium Center in downtown Knoxville from January 6-27, 2017. A public reception will take place on Friday, January 6, from 5:00-9:00 PM to which the public is invited to meet the artists and view the artwork. Most of the works are for sale and may be purchased through the close of the exhibition. Complimentary hors d’oeuvres will be available.

The O’Connor Senior Center Painters present a new exhibition of more than 40 watercolors, oils, and acrylics entitled “Breaking Ground – What You Want to See” featuring more than ten artists.

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Members of the Appalachian Area Chapter of Blacksmiths are pleased to present an exhibition of fine, hand-forged architectural ironwork. Photo courtesy artist blacksmith Joe Babb.

The exhibition will include a variety of items for the home including gates, grills, sculpture, furniture, lighting, fireplace equipment, and door hardware. The show will be of interest to the general public as well as interior designers, architects, and artists. Artist Blacksmiths include Joe Babb, Ron Nichols, Brad Greenwood, Ron Nichols, Mike Rose, and others.

With a goal of preserving and promoting the exciting art of blacksmithing, the Appalachian Area Chapter of Blacksmiths strives to educate and involve both men and women, young and old. AACB was founded in 1965 by Jud Nelson, Joe Humble, Joe Neely, A.P. Billingsley, and Bill Planzer. It is a nonprofit organization and an affiliate of the Artist-Blacksmith’s Association of North America.

The MLK Gallery of Arts Tribute will kick-off the 2017 King Week Celebration. The Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemorative Commission is partnering with the Arts & Culture Alliance of Greater Knoxville to provide this annual exhibition. The Galley of Arts Tribute is a juried exhibition developed to recognize local artists and most importantly to honor the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The exhibit will feature works by local artists reflecting the themes of Unity, Community, Love, Racial Reconciliation, Social Justice, and Civil Rights.

The exhibitions are on display at the Emporium Center, 100 S. Gay Street, in downtown Knoxville. Exhibition hours are Monday-Friday, 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Please note, the Emporium is closed January 16 for the holiday.

For more information, please contact the Arts & Culture Alliance at (865) 523-7543, or visit the Web site at www.knoxalliance.com.


CBT presents “A Christmas Carol”

KNOXVILLE, TN – Clarence Brown Theatre’s all new A Christmas Carol has added another performance for December 18, 2016 at 7:30 pm. With a brand new look, stunning costumes, traditional carols, an adaptation guaranteed to enrich your holiday season.

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In “A Christmas Carol,” miserly boss, Ebenezer Scrooge (whose name is now synonymous with greed and stinginess), is forced to face the true cost of his behavior in a series of supernatural visits from ghosts of Christmases Past, Present and Future. Photo courtesy Clarence Brown Theatre.

At each performance, patrons can enhance the experience by enjoying special holiday treats at the concession stand and taking pictures with “Scrooge and Tiny Tim” in a new, specially designed photo experience which will be stationed in the main lobby. The $10 children’s tickets can only be purchased by calling or stopping by the Box Office at 865-974-5161.

Free and convenient parking is available in the McClung Tower Garage on Volunteer Boulevard.

The Clarence Brown Theatre only sells tickets online through Knoxville Tickets. For tickets, call the Clarence Brown Theatre Box Office at 865-974-5161, or order online 24/7 at www.clarencebrowntheatre.com


Santa visits Chilhowee Park

Santa will be visiting Chilhowee Park this Friday, Dec. 9, 2016, from 6-9 p.m. during Christmas in Chilhowee, sponsored by Chilhowee Park & Exposition Center’s venue management partner SMG, at 3301 E Magnolia Avenue.

After the ceremonial lighting of the Christmas tree, Santa will greet guests and pose for photos in the park’s historic bandstand, which was built for the 1910 Appalachian Exposition. The Vine Middle Magnet School Choir will set a festive tone with holiday carols.

Families are invited to build gingerbread houses with the Austin-East Culinary Arts Department, enjoy balloon animals and face-painting, and participate in hands-on activities with The Muse Knoxville. Krispy Kreme will serve doughnuts, and All Occasion Catering will provide hot cocoa.

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Visitors to Christmas in Chilhowee can tour the park’s 88 lighted trees by riding the train or hopping on a hayride. Through Jan. 1, motorists can drive through the lighted tunnel during park hours. Sunset is around 5:30 p.m., and gates close at 10 p.m. Make sure Santa knows you have been good! Photo by Chilhowee Park and Exposition Center.

Admission is free. All events take place outdoors, so dress for the weather.


Lecture offered on TN marble

(Knoxville, TN) “From the Archives: Finding East Tennessee’s Marble Story” is the subject of a lecture to be presented by Dr. Susan W. Knowles, Wednesday, December 7, 2016 at the East Tennessee History Center.

Her interest piqued by Tennessee marble she saw in the United States Capitol, Knowles set out to learn more about marble from the East Tennessee region and its use in buildings and monuments across the nation. The resulting research, images, and interviews became the subject of her doctoral dissertation and now form the basis of a feature exhibition Rock of Ages: East Tennessee’s Marble Industry, of which Knowles is the guest curator.

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East Tennessee marble is prized the world over. The exhibition explores the industry and offers a first-time look into the factors that launched the rock’s fame and crowned Knoxville as the Marble City. The beautiful exhibit features an array of artifacts, videos, and photographs showcasing the importance and diversity of East Tennessee’s marble industry. Lecture attendees are invited to tour the exhibition following the lecture

Susan W. Knowles is a graduate of the Public History program at MTSU, with an M.A. in Art History from Vanderbilt University, and a Master of Library Science degree from George Peabody College. She currently serves as the Digital Humanities Research Fellow for the Center for Historic Preservation at Middle Tennessee State University. Knowles served project curator for “Trials and Triumphs: Tennesseans’ Search for Citizenship, Community, and Opportunity,” a website and digital collection on the “Jim Crow” era in Tennessee. She is currently overseeing the graduate research assistants at MTSU and coordinating building the “Southern Places” online research collections, which document more than thirty years of field work at the Center for Historic Preservation.

The program is sponsored by Consolidated Nuclear Security, LLC and is and free and open to the public. The lecture will begin at noon at the East Tennessee History Center, 601 S. Gay Street, Knoxville. Guests are invited to bring a “Brown Bag” lunch and enjoy the lecture. Soft drinks will be available. For more information on the lecture, exhibitions, or museum hours, call 865-215-8824 or visit the website at www.EastTNHistory.org.


History Museum hosts holiday event

The East Tennessee Historical Society will host a Holiday Open House on Saturday, December 10, 2016, with entertainment by the Smokyland Sound Chorus of the Greater Knoxville Chapter of the Barbershop Harmony Society. Activities include craft demonstrations and the sale of handmade items, free ornament and craft making for the kids, and holiday refreshments. Local crafter Karen Micheletta will have a selection of her handmade items made from antique quilts to purchase.

ETHS staff will lead a special activity called “A Christmas Story: Traditions Old and New from Me to You,” where audience members, young and old, will contribute to a composition of Christmas memories from yesterday and today to create a unique Christmas story or poem.

Visitors are invited to browse the ETHS Museum Store for a 10% discount on a great selection of traditional gifts, history books, and children’s items. The 10 percent public discount is good for this day only. ETHS members receive a 10 percent discount throughout the year and 15% off throughout the month of December.

Holiday Open House events are free and open to the public from 11 a.m. – 3 p.m. The Museum of East Tennessee is located at the East Tennessee History Center, 601 S. Gay Street, Knoxville.

For more information, visit www.eastTNhistory.org or call 865-215- 8824.


Concert features Mike Baggetta

The next concert in the Jazz Lunch series will feature a tribute to Ornette Coleman with Mike Baggetta and will take place on Wednesday, December 7, 2016, from noon to 1pm at the Square Room in downtown Knoxville. Admission to the concert is $15 and includes a lunch buffet served up by Café 4. Tickets are available online at http://www.knoxjazz.org or by visiting Café 4 in person prior to the show.

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Drawing from the works of the Free-Jazz pioneer, saxophonist and composer Ornette Coleman, Mike Baggetta has assembled a group of fearless improvisors with whom to reinterpret Coleman’s music with a newfound experimentalism paying tribute to the spirit of its creator. Photo: Knoxville Jazz Orchestra.

Patrons to this Jazz Lunch may expect classic Ornette tunes like Lonely Woman and Ramblin’ next to lesser known masterpieces like What Reason Could I Give and War Orphans, among others. Matt Nelson (bass) and Nolan Nevels (drums) will join Mike Baggetta for this special jazz lunch concert.

Special thanks to East Tennessee PBS, WUOT 91.9 FM, The Square Room, and Weird Monkey Studios for support of the Jazz Lunch Series.

The Square Room is a new, state-of- the-art performance venue in downtown Knoxville, TN in the Historic Market Square district. It is housed in the rear of the 4 Market Square Building along with its counterpart Café 4, a full-service restaurant and coffee bar.


Mabry-Hazen offers free tours

Mabry-Hazen House in Knoxville invites the public to join them for their annual Christmas Tours. This is the final event of the year before the historic property closes for the winter.

Rooms of the house will be decorated in the spirit of the holiday season. Tours are scheduled for Saturday, December 10th from 5-8pm and Sunday, December 11th from 2-5pm. The event is free of charge and light refreshments will be served. Donations are encouraged and appreciated. Mabry-Hazen House will be open by appointment from December 12th until March 1st, 2017.

Built in 1858, the Mabry-Hazen House is strategically located on the highest hill east of downtown Knoxville with sweeping views in all directions. The home was occupied and defended by both armies during the Civil War. It housed three generations of the same family for 130 years, and the museum showcases one of the largest original family collections in America.

Please call 865-522-8661 or visit www.mabryhazen.com for more information.


Call for artists for MLK tribute

The Arts & Culture Alliance of Greater Knoxville and the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemorative Commission announce a call for entries for the third annual Gallery of Arts Tribute, developed to recognize local artists and honor the life and times of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Approximately 40-50 fine art works of all media will be selected for display in the Atrium, North Wall, and display case galleries of the beautifully-restored Emporium Center at 100 S. Gay Street, Knoxville’s downtown arts anchor location, from January 6-27, 2017.

The Emporium is free and open to the public Monday-Friday, 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM and additional hours for special events.

Artwork should be delivered on Tuesday, January 3, between 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM.

The exhibition seeks to feature:
Works by African and African American artists living within 50 miles of Knoxville; and/or
Works that pertain to the themes of Unity, Community, Love, Reconciliation, Social Justice, and Civil Rights by any artist living within 50 miles of Knoxville.

Entries must be original and completed within the last five years in the following categories: 2-D (painting, drawing, mixed media, printmaking, photography) and 3-D (sculpture of all media). The maximum allowed size is 60” x 60” in any direction including frame or stand. Weight is not to exceed 50 lbs. unless special arrangements are made. Artwork must be suitably framed/mounted and wired for installation.

There is no entry fee. Each artist may bring up to three pieces for consideration. Submitted works will be juried by staff members of the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemorative Commission and the Arts & Culture Alliance.

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The Gallery of Arts Tribute in 2015 featured the work of 26 local artists. Pictured works from the 2015 Tribute, by: Hawa Ware-Johnson, Albert Baah, and Tina Curry. Photo submitted.

The mission of the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemorative Commission is to reaffirm and reflect upon the American ideals of freedom, justice and peace. To that end, we pledge to work inclusively with community partners to: lift and live principles of non-violence, equality and love; tell the stories of the struggles; and provide education and leadership training for adults and youth.

Artists may view the information, complete the entry form, and/or download an application at www.knoxalliance.com/mlk-tribute/.

 


See Ramsey House by candlelight

Knoxville’s historic Ramsey House will once again offer a unique holiday experience with the fundraising candlelight tour and dinner in the beautifully decorated, 1797 historic home of Francis and Peggy Alexander Ramsey on December 2-3, 2016, at 6 p.m.

The event will be held at Historic Ramsey House 2614 Thorn Grove Pike, Knoxville, Tennessee. Tickets are for individuals or groups up to ten persons; $125 per person donation to benefit Historic Ramsey House. Reservations are required 865-546- 0745.

For more information, Email judy@ramseyhouse.org.

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Also known as Swan Pond, the Ramsey House was constructed circa 1797 by English architect Thomas Hope for Colonel Francis Alexander Ramsey (1764–1820), whose family operated a plantation at the site until the U.S. Civil War.  In 1969, the house was added to the National Register of Historic Places for its architecture and its role in the region’s early 19th-century history. Photo courtesy Ramsey House.


Free museum visits for veterans

The East Tennessee Historical Society invites all veterans, active duty military, and their families to visit the Museum of East Tennessee History as our guests on Veterans Day, November 11, 2016 from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.

“Tennesseans have a proud tradition of stepping to the fore in defense of our nation and earning the state the nickname, the ‘Volunteer State,’” says ETHS Director Cherel Henderson. “We are pleased to honor the contributions of our military, past and present, by inviting them to visit the museum as our special guests on this day.”

The signature exhibition Voices of the Land: The People of East Tennessee explores three centuries of life in our region. Visitors will find stories and artifacts from the Revolutionary War to the War of 1812, and the Civil War to World War I and World War II. The Museum of East Tennessee History is open to the public before and after the Veterans Day Parade, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Museum of East Tennessee History is located at the East Tennessee History Center, 601 S. Gay Street, Knoxville.

About East Tennessee Historical Society
Established in 1834, the East Tennessee Historical Society is widely acknowledged as one of the most active history organizations in the state and enjoys a national reputation for excellence in programming and education. For 182 years the East Tennessee Historical Society has been helping East Tennesseans hold on to our unique heritage—recording the events, collecting the artifacts, and saving the stories that comprise the history we all share.


Emporium gallery features new works

The Arts & Culture Alliance is pleased to present five new exhibitions at the Emporium Center in downtown Knoxville from October 7-28, 2016. A public reception will take place on Friday, October 7, from 5:00-9:00 PM to which the public is invited to meet the artists and view the artwork. Most of the works are for sale.

The Tennessee Artists Association: The Fall Juried Show: 42nd Fall Art Exhibition in the downstairs gallery. The Tennessee Artists Association (TAA) will feature original art by over 40 Tennessee artists including oils, watercolors, acrylics, pastels, photography, and mixed media.

In the balcony gallery, the Arrowmont Experience will feature work by its current Artists-in-Residence, Grant Benoit, Richard W. James, Maia Leppo, Austin Riddle, and Emily Schubert, as well as a small selection of works from its permanent collection. This exhibition is presented in conjunction with Tennessee Craft Week, October 7-16, 2016, a collection of craft events and happenings across the state each October.

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Pottery by Rex W. Redd will be shown in the Emporium display case, from October 7-28, 2016. A public reception will take place on Friday, October 7, from 5:00-9:00 PM to which the public is invited to meet the artists and view the artwork. Most of the works are for sale. Redd’s work is an exhibition in clay that pays homage to the history of the medium, but with a contemporary flair to underscore art’s innate tendency to evolve as it passes from maker to maker. Photo courtesy the artist.

As a native Montanan, Rex W. Redd had the blessing of growing up immersed in natural beauty. The central part of the state features vast open grasslands, time worn sandstone structures, and the endless “Big Sky” for which the state is known. Redd attended the University of Montana at Missoula where he graduated with a degree in Anthropology and discovered his true love for the arts. Growing up in Montana usually means ample exposure to Charles Russell, Frederick Remington, and a variety of other cowboy-related art. Craft is dominated by an incredible variety of Native American work, tooled leather, and an array of folk art. While certainly wonderful examples to be surrounded by, college would introduce him to the world of impressionism, abstraction, contemporary craftsmen and the great masters. Redd works in several other mediums including painting, printmaking, photography and wood; often incorporating more than one into a project. He has work in several private and corporate collections throughout the United States, as well as Europe, Japan, and Australia.

Other works on display include Impressions of Nature by Dennis Sabo in the Atrium and Melanie Fetterolf’s Rain Paintings & Classroom Art on the North Wall.

The exhibitions are on display at the Emporium Center, 100 S. Gay Street, in downtown Knoxville. Exhibition hours are Monday-Friday, 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM and Sunday, 3:30-6:30 PM (through October 23). For more information, please contact the Arts & Culture Alliance at (865) 523-7543.


New giraffe at Knoxville Zoo

A new giraffe arrived in Knoxville this month to join the city’s zoo herd in the Grasslands Africa habitat. Born in St. Paul, Minnesota, at the Como Park Zoo and Conservatory, one-year-old “Frances” comes to Knoxville on the recommendation of the Giraffe Species Survival Plan (SSP), which manages the breeding and social placement of all giraffes in zoos accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA). She will be a companion to the zoo’s two female giraffes, Patches and Lucille, and a potential mate for male Jumbe in a few years when she is fully grown.

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Frances, a new giraffe welcomed into the herd at Knoxville Zoo, is approximately 10 feet tall and weighs 740 pounds, and her smaller stature will make it easy for zoo-goers to identify her. Photo submitted.

Also this month, Zoo Knoxville welcomed a new Western lowland gorilla, a female who has been christened “Andi”.

The baby is named in honor of Andie Ray, a community visionary who loved gorillas and supported Zoo Knoxville’s work to save Western lowland gorillas from extinction. Andie passed away unexpectedly in December, 2015. She was instrumental in connecting the Ray family to gorillas at Zoo Knoxville. The Ray family named the first gorilla ever born at the zoo, Obi, whose name means “heart”, in June of 2015. The name “Andi” means “brave, strong, valiant and courageous”.

Zoo Knoxville is a nonprofit entity situated on 53 wooded acres just east of downtown Knoxville. Zoo Knoxville features exhibits of wild animals in natural habitats and is world renowned for its efforts in conservation and species survival. Zoo Knoxville is nationally accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) and is committed to the highest standards in animal care and well-being, ethics, conservation, and education.
Knoxville’s largest attraction, the zoo is open every day except Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. Currently, the zoo is open daily from 9:30 a.m. until 6:00 p.m. Admission and ticket sales stop one-hour before the zoo closes.

For more information visit zooknoxville.org.


Mayor to proclaim Louie Bluie Day

Sixteen years after legendary stringband musician and artist Howard “Louie Bluie” Armstrong performed at the Laurel Theater as part of a celebrated homecoming visit to East Tennessee, his son Ralphe will pay tribute to his father’s legacy with a concert at the same venue. In honor of the occasion, Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero will personally present a proclamation designating September 22, 2016 as “Louie Bluie Day.”

Ralphe Armstrong, a Grammy-nominated jazz and rock bassist based in Detroit, will perform as part of the Armstrong Legacy Trio, which also includes guitarist Ray Kamalay and violinist/mandolin player John Reynolds. The concert is Thursday, September 22, 8 p.m. at the Laurel Theater.

Through her proclamation, Mayor Rogero’s will acknowledge Tennessee native Howard Armstrong’s musical virtuosity and his part in music history as a member of the Tennessee Chocolate Drops, who recorded for Vocalion during the St. James recording sessions of 1929. Howard, who was born in Dayton and grew up in LaFollette, received a WC Handy Award (now Blues Music Award), and the National Endowment for the Arts called him a “national treasure” when they made him a National Heritage Fellow award in 1990.

Tickets to the concert are $20 for Jubilee Community Arts members, $21 for non-members. Advance tickets are available online at JubileeArts.org; remaining tickets will be sold at the door starting at 7:30 p.m.

Ralphe was performing with his father by age 5. By 13, he played with Smokey Robinson and the Miracles; by 16 he affiliated with Jean-Luc Ponty and Frank Zappa (which continued for many years). The original bassist in the Mahavishnu Orchestra with John MacLaughlin, Ralphe has performed and recorded with Aretha Franklin, James Carter, Sting, Roger Daltrey, Eminem, and many more artists in a wide variety of genres. Earlier this year, Ralphe was honored by his hometown and voted “Best Jazz Instrumentalist” at the Detroit Music Awards.

Kamalay has shared stages with Mark O’Connor, Doc Watson, Jethro Burns, Steve Goodman, and others. He began performing with Howard and Ralphe in 1988 when the three of them formed the Howard Armstrong Trio.

Reynolds was influenced by a number of traditional music masters including Howard Armstrong, with whom he performed for decades.

The Armstrong Legacy Trio’s performance at the Laurel Theater previews their 4:15 p.m. set at the 10th Louie Bluie Music & Arts Festival on Saturday, September 24, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. at Cove Lake State Park in Caryville, Tenn. For more information about the festival, visit LouieBluie.org.


Carpetbag Theatre receives grant

The Carpetbag Theatre, Inc. is proud to announce the receipt of a major multi-year grant awarded from The Roy Cockrum Foundation in support of the organization’s 50th Anniversary Celebration Series.

The Carpetbag Theatre, Inc. will be utilizing the funds received to remount six of the most beloved plays from the theatre’s past, as well as supporting the future creation and development of Carpetbag’s newest original work currently entitled, “Bricks.”

With generous support from The Roy Cockrum Foundation, Carpetbag will be remounting these original works as fully produced performances at fully equipped Knoxville and Maryville, Tennessee venues. The performances will take place over the course of the three years leading up to the Anniversary celebration (2017, 2018, 2019) with two productions per year. CBT will invite former ensemble members who have remained in the professional field to return as guest artists and directors of the project.

The scheduled plays to be presented are as follows: Between A Ballad and A Blues, Nothin’ Nice, Dark Cowgirls and Prairie Queens, Ce Nitram Sacul, SWOPERA (a Spoken Word Opera), and Red Summer. The development of Carpetbag’s newest work, “Bricks” will trace the history of the African American brick making industry and its significance to the region.

The Carpetbag Theatre is a Professional African American Legacy Theater company with a rich history of service to diverse populations. As an intergenerational ensemble company, the company’s efforts are to engage communities of color and other disenfranchised communities. An ensemble company both artistically and administratively, CBT works collaboratively to fulfill this mission, to build communities and to develop social capital, emphasizing inclusion and cross-cultural dialogue.

The mission of The Roy Cockrum Foundation is to award grants to support world-class performing arts projects in not-for-profit professional theaters throughout the United States.


Living History at Marble Springs

THIS WEEKEND Marble Springs State Historic Site is pleased to host a weekend of Living History in celebration of the life and times of the first governor of Tennessee, John Sevier, in commemoration of his 271 st birthday. John Sevier Days Living History Weekend will take place Saturday, September 17, 2016 from 10:00 AM– 5:00 PM and Sunday, September 18, from 11:00 – 4:00 PM. You can expect to enjoy 18th century demonstrations such as open-hearth cooking, spinning and weaving, blacksmithing, weapons demonstrations that will showcase period-appropriate firearms, 18th century style militia drills, regional craft demonstrations, historic lecture, and hands on archeology activities. Food, drinks, and special treats will be available.

Admission for Sevier Days is $5.00 per adult (16+); $3 per child (7-15); 6 and under FREE; Parking is free. All proceeds benefit the mission of preservation and education of the Marble Springs State Historic Site.

For more information call (865)573-5508 or email infor@marblesprings.net or visit www.marblesprings.net.

Programming assistance for this event is provided by Knox County. Marble Springs is funded under an agreement with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Tennessee Historical Commission, and supplemented by additional funds raised by the Governor John Sevier Memorial Association.

All activities take place at the Marble Springs State Historic Site: 1220 West Governor John Sevier Highway.

About Marble Springs State Historic Site

Marble Springs State Historic Site is the last remaining home of John Sevier. Born in Virginia in 1745, John Sevier made a name for himself as a Revolutionary War Hero during the Battle of Kings Mountain (1780), a key player; Governor of the short-lived State of Franklin (1784-1788), and ultimately was elected to serve as the first Governor of the State of Tennessee (1796). Marble Springs was the approximate 350-acre farm that Sevier lived on from 1801-1815, the last years of his life. Sevier named his farm Marble Springs because of the Tennessee Rose Marble that was quarried on site and the natural springs that flowed on the property.


The Crucible at Carousel Theatre

Arthur Miller’s classic “The Crucible” will play in the Clarence Brown Theatre’s Carousel Theatre September 28 – October 16, 2016. A Pay What You Wish Preview performance will be held Wednesday, September 28. The second Preview will take place on Thursday, September 29 and Opening Night will take place on Friday September 30. The Talk Back with the cast will take place Sunday, September 9 following the matinee and the Open Captioned performance is Sunday, September 16 at 2:00 pm. A panel discussion about the impact of the play upon political discussions during its time and today will take place after the Sunday, September 16 matinee.

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Lauren Pennline, Grant Goodman, and Jenny McKnight to perform in Arthur Miller’s classic “The Crucible” at the Clarence Brown Theatre’s Carousel Theatre September 28 – October 16, 2016. Photo by Elizabeth Aaron.

Winner of the Tony Award for Best Play, “The Crucible” is an ageless tale of fear, greed and power written by one of the greatest American playwrights of all time. When teenage girls are discovered trying to conjure spirits, the 17th century town of Salem explodes with accusations of witchcraft. The vicious trials that follow expose a community paralyzed by terror, religious extremism and greed, and a marriage forever changed.

Miller composed “The Crucible” as a dramatization of the Salem Witch Trials, with the witch trials standing in for the anti-Communist “witch-hunts” of the 1950s during the McCarthy era. As with the alleged witches of Salem, suspected Communists were encouraged to confess and identify other Communist sympathizers in order to escape punishment. Many of those accused of Communism suffered loss of employment and/or destruction of their careers; some even suffered imprisonment.

“In my view, ‘The Crucible’ is a quintessential American play,” said director Calvin MacLean. “Drawing on a moment of history in the founding of the American experiment, and steeped in a more recent political upheaval, it reveals the strengths and flaws of our national character – our independence of spirit and self-assurance, our pride; our struggles to accept people and ideas different from us, and our tendency to demonize people we fear. Sound familiar?”

The cast is comprised of visiting guest artists, UT Theatre faculty and graduate and undergraduate students, as well as community actors.

For more information, tickets or accessibility accommodation requests including Open Captioning, American Sign Language, and assistive technologies, please call the CBT Box Office at 865-974-5161.


Mural unveiled at Chilhowee Park

A new mural was unveiled at Chilhowee Park & Exposition Center in Knoxville, Tennessee on Friday, Sept. 9, 2016. This community-led project was funded by a grant from the Tennessee Arts Commission, the East Tennessee Foundation and the First Tennessee Foundation.

“Chilhowee Park & Exposition Center plays a vital role in this community as a gathering place for recreation and fellowship,” said Knoxville City Councilman Daniel Brown. “I have many great memories of this park, which has served as the heart of this neighborhood since the early 1900s. This mural will provide great enjoyment to the local residents and guests that come to this facility.”

A neighborhood group developed the idea for a mural representing East Knoxville to be painted on a retaining wall at Chilhowee Park & Exposition Center. A committee of neighborhood association members selected University of Tennessee graduate and Nashville-based artist Brandon Donahue to develop a mural design that incorporated the history of East Knoxville and Chilhowee Park.

The mural was completed in late August this year.

Chilhowee Park and Exposition Center is an 81-acre, multiuse venue owned by the City of Knoxville. It is located blocks away from interstate access and minutes from downtown Knoxville. The facility includes a three-acre lake, bandstand, 4,500-seat amphitheater, 57,100-square-foot exhibition hall, barns, arenas, playground and picnic shelters. Chilhowee also is home to the Tennessee Valley Fair.

mural-ceremony
Elected officials and representatives of the City of Knoxville Public Arts Committee, Arts and Culture Alliance, East Tennessee Foundation and First Tennessee Foundation joined muralist Brandon Donahue to cut the ribbon on a new mural in Chilhowee Park & Exposition Center on Sept. 9, 2016. From left: Public Arts Committee member Susana Esrequis; Bob Booker; Judge John Rosson; Public Arts Committee member Tanisha Fitzgerald-Baker; Knox County Commissioner John Schoonmaker; City Councilman Finbarr Saunders; artist Brandon Donahue; Knox County Commissioner Evelyn Gill; Ed Shouse; City Councilman Daniel Brown; First Tennessee Bank Foundation’s Joshalyn Hundley; East Tennessee Foundation’s Jan Elston; and Arts and Culture Alliance’s Liza Zenni. Photo submitted.


Lecture highlights radio history

(Knoxville, TN) For decades, Julian Burke has collected unique pieces of broadcasting equipment, including the original announcer microphones from WNOX, the legendary Knoxville radio station known as the “Cradle of Country Music.” In a Brown Bag Lecture on Wednesday, September 14, 2016, at noon, Burke will share early history and artifacts from WNOX’s studio.

The lecture is held in conjunction with the exhibition, Come to Make Records: Knoxville’s Contributions to American Popular Music, on display at the Museum of East Tennessee History through October 30. The exhibit examines the 1929 and 1930 Brunswick Records’ Vocalion label’s recordings that took place at the St. James Hotel in downtown Knoxville and invited locals to come make records. These old-time, jazz, blues, and gospel recordings added Knoxville’s voice to American popular music and inspired the next generation of country music stars. The exhibition features an array of artifacts, videos, sound recordings, and photographs showcasing East Tennessee’s diverse musical heritage and the importance of WNOX Radio.

Julian Burke is recognized locally as one of the foremost experts on old televisions and radios. He has been a lifelong lover of electronics and started collecting old radios by going door to door at age 7, and he hasn’t stopped since. By 13, he was repairing radios and televisions around Knoxville.

The program is sponsored by Consolidated Nuclear Security, LLC, and is and free and open to the public. The lecture will begin at noon at the East Tennessee History Center, 601 S. Gay Street, Knoxville. Guests are invited to bring a “Brown Bag” lunch and enjoy the lecture. Soft drinks will be available.

For more information on the lecture, exhibitions, or museum hours, call 865-215-8824 or visit the website at www.EastTNHistory.org.


Knoxville Coliseum launches new website

The Knoxville Civic Auditorium and Coliseum recently launched a new website so that patrons may keep up with who is performing at the facility and buy tickets to concerts and shows through the events calendar.

The new site also offers information on concessions and parking for visitors.

Coming this fall:

Disney On Ice returns to Knoxville with 10 performances Nov. 2-6, 2016. Enter a world where adventure awaits and courage leads the way at Disney On Ice presents Dream Big. High-flying jumps, daring acrobatics, breathtaking maneuvers and lovable Disney friends make this an experience your family will never forget.

NeedToBreathe

Grammy-nominated American rock band NEEDTOBREATHE is joined by special guests Mat Kearney, John Mark McMillan and Welshly Arms on September 25 for the “TOUR DE COMPADRES,” featuring music from the band’s sixth studio album, “Hard Love.”

Classic country band Alabama is joined by the Charlie Daniels Band on October 21 for the “Southern Drawl Tour.” Both members of the Country Music Hall of Fame, the groups will play multiple hits from their decades-long careers.

Visit KnoxvilleColiseum.com.


Marble Springs hosts Living History

KNOXVILLE, TN – Marble Springs State Historic Site will host a weekend of Living History in celebration of the life and times of the first governor of Tennessee, John Sevier, in commemoration of his 271st birthday.

John Sevier Days Living History Weekend will take place Saturday, September 17, 2016 from 10:00 AM– 5:00 PM and Sunday, September 18, from 11:00 – 4:00 PM. You can expect to enjoy 18th century demonstrations such as open-hearth cooking, spinning and weaving, blacksmithing, weapons demonstrations that will showcase period-appropriate firearms, 18th century style militia drills, regional craft demonstrations, historic lecture, hands on archeology activities, and more. Food, drinks, and special treats will be available. Details are subject to change.

Admission for Sevier Days is $5.00 per adult (16+); $3 per child (7-15); 6 and under FREE; Parking is free. All proceeds benefit the mission of preservation and education of the Marble Springs State Historic Site.

Programming assistance for this event is provided by Knox County. Marble Springs is funded under an agreement with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Tennessee Historical Commission, and supplemented by additional funds raised by the Governor John Sevier Memorial Association.

Marble Springs State Historic Site is located at 1220 West Governor John Sevier Highway, Knoxville, TN, 37920.

Marble Springs State Historic Site is the last remaining home of John Sevier. Born in Virginia in 1745, John Sevier made a name for himself as a Revolutionary War Hero during the Battle of Kings Mountain (1780), a key player and Governor of the short-lived State of Franklin (1784-1788), and ultimately was elected to serve as the first Governor of the State of Tennessee (1796).

For more information call (865)573-5508.


Iconic sign gets an upgrade

KNOXVILLE, TN – The Tennessee Theatre will celebrate the return of its iconic vertical sign to Gay Street and the newly refurbished marquee with a free open house and relighting ceremony on Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2016.

“The vertical sign is an important part of downtown Knoxville’s visual identity and our theater’s history,” Tennessee Theatre Executive Director Becky Hancock said. “After more than two months of work, we will welcome back our vertical sign and refurbished marquee, both of which will shine on Gay Street even brighter and better. We look forward to the public joining us for the celebration.”

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During the open house sponsored by McCarty Holsaple McCarty Architects and Interior Designers, the Tennessee Theatre will be open to the public for self-guided tours of the stage and backstage areas from 6-8 p.m. House organist Dr. Bill Snyder will play the Mighty Wurlitzer organ, and a caricature artist will be at the event to draw guests with the iconic Tennessee Theatre marquee.

At 8 p.m., guests will move outside onto Gay Street, which will be closed in front of the theater for the event, for a ceremony featuring Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero, Tennessee Theatre board members and officials from Pattison Sign Group, which handled the project. Elected officials and donors will join Hancock in leading a countdown to the official relighting of the vertical sign and marquee with brighter, more energy-efficient LED light bulbs.

When the marquee project was announced in April, the Tennessee Theatre launched a fundraising campaign to raise $150,000 to cover the cost of the refurbishment. Through cash and in-kind donations, the theater has raised more than $136,000 and is asking for the community’s continued support to completely fund the project.

At the event, guests also will have the opportunity to sponsor a bulb for $25 or purchase several commemorative items, including a hand-crafted vertical sign glass ornament or fine art print of the marquee, to help fund the project. More information on the campaign can be found at www.tennesseetheatre.com/marquee.

The marquee project also was supported by a $65,000 grant from the City of Knoxville, corporate gifts from Pattison Sign Group and Scripps Networks Interactive, and individual donations from the community.

Locally headquartered Pattison Sign Group, one of the largest sign and visual communication companies in the world, donated its services at cost to remove the vertical sign, replace all light bulbs, repair wiring and damage and reaffix the sign to the Burwell Building.

At its facility in South Carolina, Pattison Sign Group divided the four-ton vertical sign into three pieces for accessibility to replace 3,300 light bulbs with energy-efficient LED lighting; install electrical upgrades; repaint the sign; and repair cosmetic damage from daily wear-and-tear and recent hailstorms.

Additionally, the company oversaw repairs on the Tennessee Theatre marquee, which remained in place. Approximately 2,400 light bulbs were replaced, cosmetic damage was repaired, the marquee was repainted and message boards on the marquee were replaced and upgraded.

“The Tennessee Theatre sign is one of the most beloved icons of our region,” said Jeff Allison, sales manager at Pattison Sign Group. “At Pattison, we do work around the world, but this project has been especially meaningful for our employees who live and work in this community. We are pleased to be able to give Knoxville a brighter and more beautiful sign and marquee.”

Pattison Sign Group anticipates that the vertical sign will return to Gay Street about a week before the official relighting and will remain dark until the ceremony. Gay Street will be closed overnight for the sign to be placed back on the Burwell Building, a process expected to take approximately eight hours.

About the Tennessee Theatre

Located in the heart of downtown Knoxville, the Tennessee Theatre opened in 1928 as a movie palace. The Tennessee Theatre is the Official State Theatre of Tennessee and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The Tennessee Theatre is the region’s leading performing arts center with advanced technology, staging and lighting that draws top entertainment to the Knoxville area.

For more information, visit www.tennesseetheatre.com.


Clarence Brown Theatre season begins

KNOXVILLE, TN – Single tickets to the 2016/2017 Clarence Brown Theatre Season are now on sale. The 2016/2017 Season includes:

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“Violet”
Music by Jeanine Tesori
Book and Lyrics by Brian Crawley
Based on “The Ugliest Pilgrim” by Doris Betts
August 31 – September 18
Clarence Brown Mainstage

Scarred in a farm accident, Violet takes a bus to Tulsa – via Johnson City, Kingsport, Knoxville, Nashville and Memphis – to be healed by an evangelical preacher. On the way, she learns the real meaning of love, courage, and beauty.

“The Crucible”
By Arthur Miller
September 28 – October 16
Carousel Theatre

This searing play chronicles the historical events in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. The fear and accusations of Salem may be an aberration of the American Dream, but it has lent its name to later witch hunts that recur from time to time in the ongoing American story.

“This is Our Youth”
By Kenneth Lonergan
October 26 – November 13
Lab Theatre

Three wayward adolescents on the cusp of adulthood navigate Reagan-era New York, recreating their broken homes in their dysfunctional friendships and bungled attempts to find love.

“A Christmas Carol”
Adapted by Edward Morgan and Joseph Hanreddy
November 23 – December 11
Clarence Brown Mainstage

Ebenezer Scrooge gets one last chance for redemption when he sees his past, present, and the possibilities for the future with four persuasive ghosts.

“Outside Mullingar”
By John Patrick Shanley
February 1 – 19
Clarence Brown Mainstage

Filled with beautiful language and set in the rural hills of Ireland, this romantic comedy reminds us that – early or late – love always arrives on time. Farmers Anthony and Rosemary are clueless when it comes to love. To find it, they will have to overcome a land feud, family rivalries, and their own fears about romance.

“The Busy Body”
By Susanna Centlivre
February 22 – March 12
Carousel Theatre

A young woman, her handsome lover, and their friends plot to escape a controlling guardian in this hilarious Restoration comedy.

“Top Girls”
By Caryl Churchill
March 29 – April 16
Lab Theatre

In a world of the “Supermom” and a shattering glass ceiling, this play considers the conflicts that come with the pursuit of success and the desire to “have it all.”

“Around the World in 80 Days”
Adapted by Mark Brown
From the Novel by Jules Verne
April 19 – May 7
Clarence Brown Mainstage

The intrepid Phileas Fogg with his loyal valet, Passepartout, voyage from Victorian London through the Indian subcontinent, to Asia and across the Pacific to America on a wager that he will return in precisely 80 days. Literally, a theatrical tour-de-force.

For more information, tickets or accessibility accommodation requests including Open Captioning, ASL, and assistive technologies, please call the CBT Box Office at 865-974-5161.


Knoxville Zoo hosts Pokemon GO week

Zoo Knoxville has declared August 1-7, 2016, as Pokémon GO Week. Players who show the Pokémon GO app on their mobile devices at the ticket window will receive $10 zoo admission for each member of their party.

Pokemon Rhino

Zoo Knoxville has 15 Pokéstops and three gyms in the park, and to help attendees catch plenty of characters, lures will be dropped throughout each day of the week, with updates on their locations shared on the Zoo Knoxville Twitter feed @zooknoxville.

Zoo Knoxville has plenty of real creatures to admire as well, and visitors are encouraged to take a break from augmented reality to enjoy the zoo’s animals, keeper chats, shows and play areas while they incubate PokéEggs.

Safety is always Zoo Knoxville’s top priority, and visitors are asked to keep their Pokémon hunt on the zoo’s public pathways.

Discounted admission for Pokémon GO players and their accompanying guests are good August 1-7, 2016, and valid at time of purchase for same-day admission only. This promotion cannot be combined with any other offer.

Zoo Knoxville is a nonprofit entity situated on 53 wooded acres just east of downtown Knoxville. Zoo Knoxville features exhibits of wild animals in natural habitats and is world renowned for its efforts in conservation and species survival. Zoo Knoxville is nationally accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) and is committed to the highest standards in animal care and well-being, ethics, conservation, and education.

Knoxville’s largest attraction, the zoo is open every day except Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. Currently, the zoo is open daily from 9:30 a.m. until 6:00 p.m. Admission and ticket sales stop one-hour before the zoo closes.

For more information visit zooknoxville.org.


Chilhowee Park adds to staff

KNOXVILLE, TN – Chilhowee Park and Exposition Center has selected Greg Mackay as director and hired Michael Tarrant as event manager. As Chilhowee Park and Exposition Center director, Mackay will assist the general manager in overseeing the operations of the park and the services provided to events held at its facilities.

“Greg Mackay’s knowledge of Chilhowee will be an asset as we continue to serve our current clients and attract new events to the multipurpose venue,” General Manager Mary Bogert said. “We are pleased to have him on our team.”

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Greg Mackay served as the director of the Public Assembly Facilities Department for the City of Knoxville since 2013. Following an 11-year career as a realtor, he was a Knox County election commissioner from 1990 to 1998 and was the administrator of elections for Knox County from 2003 to 2011. Photo submitted. 

Mackay is a graduate of the Webb School of Knoxville and earned a bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of Tennessee. He serves as the chair of the university’s Political Science Advisory Board.

In the newly created position of event manager, Tarrant will handle event booking and coordination for the site, which includes a three-acre lake, bandstand, 4,500-seat amphitheater, 57,100-square- foot exhibition hall, barns, arenas, playground and picnic shelters.

“Michael Tarrant will help us further improve client service for events at Chilhowee,” Bogert said. “As a longtime resident of East Knoxville, he is a great addition to our team to assist our efforts in connecting the park and exposition center to the surrounding neighborhood and business partners.”

Tarrant

Michael Tarrant is a graduate of Austin-East High School and earned a bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of Tennessee. In his spare time, Tarrant enjoys reading and volunteering with Edgewood Chapel AME Zion Church, where his father serves as pastor. Photo submitted.

Chilhowee Park and Exposition Center is an 81-acre, multi-use venue owned by the City of Knoxville. It is located blocks away from interstate access and minutes from downtown Knoxville. The facility includes a three-acre lake, bandstand, 4,500-seat amphitheater, 57,100-square- foot exhibition hall, barns, arenas, playground and picnic shelters. Chilhowee also is home to the Tennessee Valley Fair.


KMA hosts Johnson Collection exhibit

The Knoxville Museum of Art announces Romantic Spirits: Nineteenth Century Paintings of the South from the Johnson Collection, featuring more than thirty 19th-century masterworks from the renowned Spartanburg, South Carolina-based collection. Exhibition runs August 26 through November 6, 2016.

The paintings in Romantic Spirits present an evocative glimpse into nineteenth-century Southern life, and reveal the importance of oral tradition and “a sense of place” in the development of the Romantic Movement in the South. The exhibition seeks to present a balanced view of how Romanticism evolved in the North and the South, the genre’s ties to Europe, and how culture, customs, education, and travel influenced each artist. It also reveals connections between featured painters and their contemporaries, specifically authors and poets such as Harriet Beecher Stowe, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, among others.

Lloyd Branson (1853-1925), Still Life with Peaches, 1895

One of the highlights of the Knoxville Museum of Art’s Romantic Spirits: Nineteenth Century Paintings of the South from the Johnson Collection, is this work by Knoxville artist Lloyd Branson, (1853-1925), Still Life with Peaches, 1895, oil on canvas, 17 x 23 7/8 inches, The Johnson Collection, Spartanburg, South Carolina. Exhibition runs August 26 through November 6, 2016. Photo courtesy KMA.

The public is invited to an exhibition preview reception on Thursday, August 25 from 5:30-7:30pm. In addition to the preview reception, additional Romantic Spirits events are taking place at the museum. These events are free and open to the public.

Wednesday, September 7, 12-1pm, Dine & Discover with Artist Virginia Derryberry; Tuesday, September 27, 5:30-7pm: Cocktails & Conversation with University of Tennessee Assistant Professor of Art History Mary Campbell;
Thursday, October 20, 12-1pm: Dine & Discover with Johnson Collection Curator Erin Corrales-Diaz.

The Knoxville Museum of Art celebrates the art and artists of East Tennessee, presents new art and new ideas, serves and educates diverse audiences, and enhances Knoxville’s quality of life. The museum is located in downtown Knoxville at 1050 World’s Fair Park and is open to the public Tuesday through Saturday 10am–5pm, and Sunday 1pm-5pm. Admission and parking are free. For more information, contact Angela Thomas at 865.934.2034 or visit www.knoxart.org.


Ramsey House plans Celtic celebration

KNOXVILLE, TN – On September 3, 2016, Historic Ramsey House, 2614 Thorn Grove Pike, will bring to the community A Gathering of Ancient Sounds; Celtic and Appalachian Rhythms. There will be eight exceptional musical groups offering related but diverse music that represents the best of Celtic and Appalachian music from their beginnings.

“These rhythms will keep your toes tapping and your feet ready for dancing,” said Judy LaRose, Executive Director at Historic Ramsey House.

Food vendors, re-enactors and period demonstrators will be there to provide additional enjoyment for our guests. The Historic Home will be open for tours for $5 per person. Gates open at 9am; the event runs from 10am-6pm; tickets at the gate are $10 for Ramsey House Members, $15 for non-members and children 12 and under free along with free parking.

For more information, call Judy LaRose at 865-546- 0745.


Marble Springs hosts stargazing

Venus and Jupiter are two of the brightest planets visible in the night sky. On the evening of August 27, 2016, Marble Springs State Historic Site will be hosting a Stargazing Workshop to view the conjunction of these two bright planets. The workshop will begin at 9:30pm in the cottage with a video/lecture on Venus and Jupiter before moving to the grounds to view the conjunction. The two planets will be visually very close together, appearing only 0.06 degrees apart. This workshop will conclude at 11:30pm.

Participation in stargazing events is a $1 donation. In the event of inclement weather, the video/lecture portion will still take place. Details are subject to change.

This workshop will take place at Marble Springs State Historic Site at 1220 W. Gov. John Sevier Highway, Knoxville, TN 37920. For more information email info@marblesprings.net or call (865)573-5508.

Programming assistance for this event is provided by Knox County. Marble Springs is funded under an agreement with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Tennessee Historical Commission, and supplemented by additional funds raised by the Governor John Sevier Memorial Association.

About Marble Springs State Historic Site

Marble Springs State Historic Site is the last remaining home of John Sevier. Born in Virginia in 1745, John Sevier made a name for himself as a Revolutionary War Hero during the Battle of Kings Mountain (1780), a key player and Governor of the short-lived State of Franklin (1784-1788), and ultimately was elected to serve as the first Governor of the State of Tennessee (1796).

Marble Springs was the approximate 350-acre farm that Sevier lived on from 1801-1815, the last years of his life. Sevier named his farm Marble Springs because of the Tennessee Rose Marble that was quarried on site and the natural springs that flowed on the property.

While visiting Marble Springs, guests have the opportunity to tour several historic structures that are designed to represent various aspects of John Sevier’s life and times. These structures include: the Tavern, Loom House, Smoke House, Spring House and the John Sevier Cabin and detached kitchen.

For more information, call (865)573-5508.


Bird art on display at Emporium

Among the exhibitors for the upcoming Knoxville Emporium shows are local artists Melinda Adams and Marjorie Holbert, who will be featured in the Emporium display case with photography and carvings that are sure to delight bird lovers.

The Arts & Culture Alliance is pleased to present five new exhibitions at the Emporium Center in downtown Knoxville from August 5-26, 2016. A public reception will take place on Friday, August 5, 2016 from 5:00-9:00 PM to which the public is invited to meet the artists and view the artwork.

Most of the works are for sale and may be purchased through the close of the exhibition. The First Friday reception also features Pasion Flamenca from 6:00-6:30 PM and a Jazz Jam with Vance Thompson’s Friends from 7:00-9:00 PM in the Black Box. Complimentary hors d’oeuvres will be available, and chocolate fondue will be provided by the Melting Pot of Knoxville.

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Melinda Adams is an amateur photographer (image courtesy the artist, featured above) with a passion for wildlife, architecture, and landscape. As a young girl living on a farm in East Tennessee, she would walk the acres of farmland in search of a great photo. Such a luxury of a camera was unheard of at that time in her life. Eventually, she managed to save money and buy herself a Polaroid camera. She could not take many photos because the film for the camera at that time was so expensive, and the few photos Adams took she cherishes to this day. She has received multiple awards from the Tennessee Valley Fair competitions. Her work has juried into Knoxville Photo and Arts in the Airport exhibitions, and she received a merit award for her work at the International Biscuit Festival.

MarjorieHolbert

Marjorie Holbert began woodcarving (Roadrunner and Cactus, image courtesy the artist) six years ago by initially carving caricatures. Soon, she found herself interested in carving birds. Holbert’s daughter and son-in-law are passionate birders and would send her pictures of many birds that they would see on their trips. Often, they would ask her if she could identify the birds, which sparked her interest in birds and bird woodcarving. Holbert has won multiple awards at the Smoky Mountain Woodcarvers annual show in Townsend each October. She will be a featured exhibitor at the Foothills Craft Guild’s annual show in November.

The exhibitions are on display at the Emporium Center, 100 S. Gay Street, in downtown Knoxville. Exhibition hours are Monday-Friday, 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM. For more information, please contact the Arts & Culture Alliance at (865) 523-7543, or visit the Web site at www.knoxalliance.com.


History Center hosts First Families reunion

(Knoxville, TN) The East Tennessee Historical Society will commemorate the state’s 220th birthday with a First Families of Tennessee Reunion and Jubilee, August 19-21, 2016. The weekend will include a FFT dinner at Marble Springs, home of Tennessee Governor John Sevier, with period music, dances, and living history presentations, and tours of Marble Springs, with special time set aside for attendees to visit, compare research, and meet up with cousins.

A genealogy conference will focus on records and research methods for the pioneer period, as well as the history of the state’s early settlement, including the Watauga Association, the State of Franklin, county and state records, and more. The conference keynote speaker will be Troy Wayne Poteete, chief justice of the Cherokee Supreme Court, Tahlequah, Oklahoma, who will discuss the experiences of the Cherokee after they reached Oklahoma.

On Sunday, August 21, bus tours will travel to important pioneer sites in upper East Tennessee, such as Sycamore Shoals, Tipton-Haynes House, the site of the Battle of the State of Franklin, and replica of the State of Franklin log cabin capitol in Greeneville.

The First Families of Tennessee Reunion will be held in conjunction with the annual East Tennessee History Fair, which will take place on Saturday. The fair features traditional music, children’s games and activities, vintage films, living history presentations from the Cherokee to the Vietnam War, a History Hound costume competition, free admission to the Museum of East Tennessee History, bus tours to historic sites, and a birthday party for Davy Crockett, complete with cake.

First Families of Tennessee is a family heritage program of the East Tennessee Historical Society, with membership open to anyone who can prove descent from an ancestor who was in Tennessee by statehood in 1796. FFT has almost 16,000 members representing all fifty states and eight foreign countries.

All events are open to the public. Most East Tennessee History Fair activities are free. Pre-registration and a fee are required for participation in First Families of Tennessee events. For more information on the schedule of events, costs, and registration, see www.eastTNhistory.org/FFTReunion.

About the East Tennessee Historical Society

Established in 1834, the East Tennessee Historical Society has been helping East Tennesseans hold on to our unique heritage—recording the events, collecting the artifacts, and saving the stories that comprise the history we all share. The historical society pursues its education mission through publications, lectures, conferences, school programs, museum exhibits, and heritage programs such as the popular First Families of Tennessee and Civil War Families of Tennessee. The East Tennessee History Center houses the staff and programs of the East Tennessee Historical Society, the Museum of East Tennessee History, the Calvin M. McClung Historical Collection, and the Knox County Archives.


Knox Civic hires new staff members

KNOXVILLE, TN – (June 28, 2016) The Knoxville Civic Auditorium and Coliseum (KCAC) has hired Mitch List as assistant general manager and Scott McKnight as operations manager. As assistant general manager, List supports the general manager in overseeing all aspects of KCAC.

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Mitch List has a strong background in event services and formerly served at Kansas Expocentre in Topeka, Kansas. His experience at the Expocentre will serve List well as he helps supervise the administration, operation and maintenance of the venues.  Photo submitted.

KCAC also has hired Scott McKnight, a facilities management professional, as operations manager. In that role, he is devoted to making sure the building is clean, comfortable, well-maintained and safe for clients and patrons.

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Scott McKnight joined the KCAC following a 25-year career in facilities management for several public school districts in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex. His most recent work as director of facilities and operations for Irving Independent School District included management of a $20 million budget and more than 300 employees. Photo submitted.

In 1998, he earned his bachelor’s degree in business management from LeTourneau University in Longview, Texas. Originally from Rome, Georgia, McKnight now resides in Sevierville.

The Knoxville Civic Auditorium and Coliseum is conveniently located near the junction of Interstates 75 and 40 and sits downtown near the University of Tennessee campus. The facility attracts more than 250,000 people per year through a wide array of events, including Knoxville Ice Bears hockey games and the Knoxville Symphony Orchestra Pops Series. The facility includes a 6,500-capacity coliseum with 22,000-square- feet of exhibit space; 2,500-capacity auditorium; 10,000-square- foot exhibit hall; 4,800-square- foot ballroom; and a natural lawn amphitheater with a capacity of 10,000.


McClung displays mate to artifact

KNOXVILLE—A prehistoric Native American statue currently on display in the lobby of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville’s McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture is thought to be the female counterpart to a male figure that was named the Tennessee State Artifact in 2014.

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The pair appears to have been made by the same sculptor between A.D. 1250 and 1350, and the two rank among the finest prehistoric sculptures ever found in the United States. Both statues were found in the 1930s at the Sellars farm in Wilson County, Tennessee, and they appeared together for the first time in the Tennessee State Museum’s recent “Ancestors” exhibition. Paired male and female statues are thought to represent founding ancestors of the prehistoric Native American societies of the middle South.

The male statue was sold to UT in 1940 by the tenant farmer. The figure has been featured in several scientific and popular publications, including a 1941 issue of “Time” magazine and as a United States postal stamp celebrating the opening of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in 2004. It has been featured in various museums worldwide, including the 1992 exhibition “Tresors du Nouveau Monde” at the Musees Royaux d’Art et d’Histoire in Brussels, Belgium, and the Art Institute of Chicago’s exhibit “Hero, Hawk, and Open Hand” in 2004 and 2005.

The female statue was sold by the Sellars family to Lillard Yeaman, sheriff of Smith County and an amateur archaeologist, and then to John C. Waggoner Jr. of Carthage, Tennessee. Waggoner has loaned the statue to UT, and the pair will be on display in the lobby of the McClung Museum through the end of the year.

Recognizing the importance of keeping the statue in Tennessee and reuniting it with its male counterpart, Waggoner has offered the museum a purchase option. To reach this end, the museum is now engaged in a fundraising effort.

Exhibits at the McClung Museum showcase the geologic, historical and artistic past of Tennessee, as well as cultures from around the globe.

The McClung Museum is at 1327 Circle Park Drive. Museum admission is free, and the museum’s hours are 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Monday to Saturday and 1–5 p.m. Sundays.


CBT names new board members

KNOXVILLE, TN – The Clarence Brown Theatre, one of thirteen professional LORT (League of Regional Theatres) theatres on a university campus in the country, has announced its newly appointed 2016 Advisory Board members earlier this summer. The CBT Advisory Board is a vital link to the Greater Knoxville community, overseeing major events and fundraisers, the CBT Society Scholarship, and engaging the community to grow the theatre’s exposure and support.

“We continue our efforts to bring to our Advisory Board ever-greater diversity in experience and viewpoint. And we are delighted that our new Board members share with our current Advisory Board a passion for the theater and for our joint professional/educational mission,” said Calvin MacLean, Artistic Producing Director of the CBT. “Truly an extraordinary group of individuals from many different walks of life.”

The newly elected Advisory Board members of the Clarence Brown Theatre include: Ron Alexander (Willis of Tennessee); Michelle D. Commander (University of Tennessee); Michael Higdon (University of Tennessee); Margie Nichols (University of Tennessee, retired); Todd Richesin (UPSTAIRS at Todd Richesin Interiors); Ingrid Ruffin (University of Tennessee).

The 2016-2017 Chair of the Advisory Board is Brooks Clark, serving the second of his two-year term.

Other Advisory, Associate, and Emeritus Board members include: Nan Bobbett, Charlie Brakebill, Rick Carl, Joe De Fiore, Susan Farris, Coral Getino, Rosemary Gilliam, Michael Grider, Carmen Harb, Nazzy Hashemian, Amy Morris Hess, Julie Howard, Tony Johnson, Russ Johnston, Bob Lederer, Brenda Madigan, Angela Masini, Maureen Dunn McBride, Sheena McCall, John North, Townes Osborn, Bob Parrott, William Pender, Stephanie Piper, Whitney Ray-Dawson, Lee Riedinger, Susan Sgarlat, Jan Simek, Steve Smith, Lamarr Stout, Kay Stoutt, Rosalyn Tillman, Alice Torbett, Joe Trahern, Peggy Turner, Robin Turner, Lacy Wallace, Alexander Waters, Alice Wirth, Melanie Wood, and Wendy Wortham.

Under the leadership of Producing Artistic Director Calvin MacLean and Managing Director David B. Byrd, the CBT season runs from September through May and features eight productions ranging from musicals to drama.

For more information, tickets or accessibility accommodation requests including Open Captioning, ASL, and assistive technologies, please call the CBT Box Office at 865-974-5161 or visit online at clarencebrowntheatre.com/access.

 


WordPlayers presents Big River

The WordPlayers Presents: Big River, the Tony Award-winning, Broadway musical based on Mark Twain’s classic novels “Huckleberry Finn” and “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.” The performance is scheduled for the U.S. Cellular Stage at the Bijou Theatre, 803 S. Gay Street, Knoxville, Tennessee on July 15, 2016- 7:30 p.m., July 16 at 2:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., and July 17 at 3 p.m.

Twain’s timeless classic sweeps us down the Mississippi as Huck discovers that Jim, a runaway slave, is a true friend. Huck has a pure heart, but because of his culture where slavery is the norm, he has an ill-trained conscience. In the struggle between his heart and conscience, Husk’s heart prevails.

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Brady Moldrup as Huck Finn and Dominic Gillette as Jim in the WordPlayers presentation of Big River. Propelled by an award-winning score from Roger Miller, the “King of the Road,” Huck’s journey toward enlightenment provides a brilliantly theatrical celebration, carrying a strong message which is anti-slavery and anti-racism. (Suggested for ages 12+). Photo courtesy Word Players.

TICKETS: Adults – $21.50; Seniors/Students – $17.50; Groups of 12 or more – $15.50 (arranged in advance by calling 865.684.1200). Tickets available online at wordplayers.org, knoxbijou.com and at the door. Please call 865-539-2490 for more information.

The WordPlayers is a 501(c) 3 company of Christian theatre artists based in Knoxville. Big River is presented in cooperation with Bearden High School. Support for The WordPlayers’ 2015-2016 Season has been provided by Delta-21 Resources, Inc. Show sponsors include Home Federal Bank, West Knoxville Kiwanis, Aubrey’s, Applegate Insurance, Erie Insurance, Johnson & Galyon, W. Andrew Fox-Attorney, Sweet P’s Barbeque, NewsTalk 98.7 and the Tennessee Riverboat Company.

For more information, contact Jeni Lamm, Managing Director – 865.539.2490.


Red wolf named at Zoo

KNOXVILLE, TN – Zoo Knoxville’s wildly popular red wolf pup now officially has a name, according to Tina Rolen, Director of Communications for Zoo Knoxville. Waya, (pronounced WAH-hyuh), is the Cherokee word for “wolf” and received the most votes after the zoo asked the community to help name him.

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“The feisty male, born at the zoo on April 30, 2016 to parents Sunny and Saaron, now weighs more than 8 pounds and is playfully exploring his habitat daily,” Rolen said. “The first red wolf born at Zoo Knoxville in 23 years, he immediately became a favorite animal with devoted followers on the zoo’s social media as well as with zoo visitors.”

EDITOR’S NOTE: Marvel Comics favorites Spider-Man and Captain America are coming to Zoo Knoxville for a special appearance at Superhero Saturday presented by Advance Financial Foundation this Saturday, June 18, 2016 from 10:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m. Kids ages 12 and under who come dressed as their favorite superhero get free admission with a paid adult admission.

Visit ZooKnoxville.org.


Emporium features five exhibits

KNOXVILLE, TN – The Arts & Culture Alliance is pleased to present five new exhibitions at the Emporium Center in downtown Knoxville from July 1-29, 2016. A public reception will take place on Friday, July 1, from 5:00-9:00 PM to which the public is invited to meet the artists and view the artwork. Most of the works are for sale and may be purchased through the close of the exhibition.

The First Friday reception also features Full Disclosure Comedy from 5:30-6:30 PM and a Jazz Jam with Vance Thompson’s Friends from 7:00-9:00 PM in the Black Box. Complimentary hors d’oeuvres will be available, and chocolate fondue will be provided by the Melting Pot of Knoxville.

Townsend Artisan Guild: A Sense of Community in the downstairs gallery
The Townsend Artisan Guild will present the works of its artists depicting the theme “A Sense of Community: Portrait of Small Towns and City Life”. Fiber artists, painters, photographers, sculptors, and woodworkers will exhibit their representation of communities and the environments they consider home.

Sculpture by Ty Crisp in the Balcony gallery
Ty’s love of woodworking evolved into furniture making, joinery and design. Upon opening his first Studio in 2004 he began experimenting in metal work, concrete and stone. This combination of elements became a catalyst for interior and exterior design concepts.

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Renee Suich: Small Stories in the display case (Image above courtesy the artist)
Renee Suich creates mixed media art including collages inspired by nature, history and the energy that surrounds us all. Early years spent in design were further fostered by time spent working at the Cleveland Museum of Art. Her work has been referred to as ‘Heritage Collage’, as she incorporates vintage imagery in a contemporary composition.

Daniel Taylor: Faces of Jazz on the North Wall
Daniel Taylor has been passionate about photography for more than half of his life. After retiring from retail sales three years ago, he was able to dedicate more time to his art. Taylor is a self-taught artist who is influenced by Peter Turnley, Elliot Erwitt and others in the world of Street Photography. He enjoys shooting casual portraits outdoors or in his home studio.

Service, Sacrifice, Honor by Cheryl Sharp in the Atrium
Celebrating the July 4th holiday and honoring the men and women of our military, “Service, Sacrifice, Honor” is a small selection of photographs of those serving their nation and the families supporting them. Several images are representative of the sacrifice of past service and those who continue to honor their memory every day. A grateful people can never forget the cost of freedom. Cheryl Sharp is a Knoxville native and a graduate of the University of Tennessee’s College of Business.

The exhibitions are on display at the Emporium Center, 100 S. Gay Street, in downtown Knoxville. Exhibition hours are Monday-Friday, 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM and Thursdays, July 7, 14, 21 & 28, 6:30-9:30 PM. Please note, the Emporium will be closed on Monday, July 4, for the holiday. For more information, please contact the Arts & Culture Alliance at (865) 523-7543, or visit the Web site at www.knoxalliance.com.


Marble Springs celebrates July 4th

Marble Springs State Historic Site will celebrate the Fourth of July with a “Let Freedom Ring” Bell Ringing ceremony. This event is in collaboration with the General Henry Knox Chapter of the Sons of the Revolution and local reenacting community. This event will take place from 10am until 4pm on July 4th and is free to the public, though donations are appreciated.

Activities will include a bell ringing ceremony, a freedom pole, and a long hunter camp. For more information, please call (865)-573- 5508, email info@marblesprings.net or visit www.marblesprings.net. Details subject to change.

All activities will take place at the Marble Springs State Historic Site at 1220 W. Governor John Sevier Highway, Knoxville, TN 37920.

Programming assistance for this event is provided by Knox County. Marble Springs is funded under an agreement with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Tennessee Historical Commission, and supplemented by additional funds raised by the Governor John Sevier Memorial Association.

Marble Springs State Historic Site is the last remaining home of John Sevier. Born in Virginia in 1745, John Sevier made a name for himself as a Revolutionary War Hero during the Battle of Kings Mountain (1780), a key player and Governor of the short-lived State of Franklin (1784-1788), and ultimately was elected to serve as the first Governor of the State of Tennessee (1796).

Marble Springs was the approximate 350-acre farm that Sevier lived on from 1801-1815, the last years of his life. Sevier named his farm Marble Springs because of the Tennessee Rose Marble that was quarried on site and the natural springs that flowed on the property.

While visiting Marble Springs, you will have the opportunity to tour several historic structures that are designed to represent various aspects of John Sevier’s life. These structures include: the Tavern, Loom House, Smoke House, Spring House, the John Sevier Cabin and detached kitchen.


Mabry-Hazen hosts July 4th event

KNOXVILLE, TN – Mabry-Hazen House will host its Fourth of July Celebration on Monday, July 4th, 2016. On historic Mabry’s Hill attendees will enjoy a great view of the July 4th fireworks show, good food, and live music by Lost Fiddle String Band. Tours of the historic home will begin at 6pm, and dinner will be served at 7:30. Alcohol is BYOB.

Previously voted one of the best places to watch the Boomsday fireworks show, Mabry-Hazen House also offers food and entertainment without the traffic. Tickets are $60 per adult and children under 12 are free when accompanied by a ticket holder. Tickets are limited to 200 adults to ensure a quality event. Purchase your tickets in advance to guarantee your attendance. There is plenty of parking and the site offers easy access to I-40 without traffic concerns.

Tickets may be purchased in advance by visiting www.mabryhazen.com or call 865-522-8661 for more information. The event will take place rain or shine. Tickets are non-refundable. Sponsored by WDVX, All Occasions Party Rentals, and Crowne Plaza Knoxville.

Built in 1858, Mabry-Hazen House is strategically located on the highest hill east of downtown Knoxville with spacious views in all directions. The home was occupied and defended by both armies during the Civil War. It housed three generations of the same family for 130 years, and the museum showcases one of the largest original family collections in America. Your attendance will help support the museum’s mission to preserve and educate the public about an important part of East Tennessee history.

Please call 865-522-8661 or visit www.mabryhazen.com for more information.


Summer Movie Magic begins

KNOXVILLE, TN – The Tennessee Theatre is pleased to announce the 18th annual Summer Movie Magic line-up presented by Denark Construction. Movie-goers will travel back in time and see these American classics as they should be: in a historic theater, with a bag of popcorn in their lap, and a cold drink in their hand. Come experience some of your favorite classics beginning in June 2016.

Both digital and 35mm films will be screened this year, and organists Bill Snyder and Freddie Brabson will play the Mighty Wurlitzer organ before each film.

Tickets can be purchased at the Tennessee Theatre box office, Ticketmaster.com or by phone at 865-684-1200 and are $9.00 adult, $7.00 children under 12 and seniors 65 and over; Subscriptions are $45.00 adult and $35.00 children and seniors.

“Summer Movie Magic is a long-standing tradition at the Tennessee Theatre, paying homage to the theater’s history and legacy as a movie palace,” said Becky Hancock, the Theatre’s Executive Director. “From opening day in 1928 and every year since, the Tennessee’s movie screen has featured Hollywood’s most beloved films and created special memories for movie-goers of all ages.”

Denark Construction returns as the presenting sponsor of the beloved Knoxville tradition! “Denark Construction is proud to be the presenting sponsor of Summer Movie Magic at the historic Tennessee Theatre,” said president Frank Rothermel. “Denark was construction manager for the comprehensive renovation completed in 2005, and the Tennessee is very special to our team, just as it is to the entire community.”

The movie line-up this year includes Some Like It Hot (Tony Curtis, Jack Lemmon, Marilyn Monroe); Casablanca (Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman); Steven Speilberg’s The Goonies; Breakfast at Tiffany’s (Audrey Hepburn); and Psycho, Alfred Hitchcock’s landmark masterpiece of the macabre stars Anthony Perkins as the troubled Norman Bates.

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Showing August 12 and 14, 2016 at the Tennessee Theatre, Alfred Hitchcock’s landmark masterpiece of the macabre stars Anthony Perkins as the troubled Norman Bates, whose old dark house and adjoining motel are not the place to spend a quiet evening. No one knows that better than Marion Crane (Janet Leigh), the ill-fated traveler whose journey ends in the notorious “shower scene.” First a private detective, then Marion’s sister (Vera Miles) searches for her, and the horror and suspense mount to a terrifying climax where the mysterious killer is finally revealed. 

Located in the heart of downtown Knoxville, the Tennessee Theatre opened in 1928 as a movie palace. The Tennessee Theatre is the Official State Theatre of Tennessee and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The Tennessee Theatre is the region’s leading performing arts facility with advanced technology, staging and lighting that draws top entertainment to the Knoxville area. The Historic Tennessee Theatre Foundation is a nonprofit organization tasked with maintaining and preserving the historic theater and ensuring diverse arts and cultural entertainment remains in downtown Knoxville.

About Denark Construction

Denark Construction is a full-service general contractor, design-builder, and construction manager, based in Knoxville, Tennessee – with over 1 billion dollars in public, institutional, commercial, and industrial contracts since its launch in 1985.


Emporium presents four exhibits

The Arts & Culture Alliance is pleased to present four new exhibitions at the Emporium Center in downtown Knoxville from June 3-24, 2016. A public reception will take place on Friday, June 3, from 5:00-9:00 PM to which the public is invited to meet the artists and view the artwork.

Most of the works are for sale and may be purchased through the close of the exhibition. The First Friday reception also features music from 7:00-9:00 PM by Swing Serenade, a four-piece jazz band who plays fast swing, original grooves, and their own arrangements of beloved standards. Pasion Flamenca will perform flamenco dance and music in the Black Box from 6:00-6:30 PM. Complimentary hors d’oeuvres will be available, and chocolate fondue will be provided by the Melting Pot of Knoxville.

The exhibits include the Knoxville Photo 2016 in the downstairs galley and Tennessee Watercolor Society 35th Exhibition in the Balcony gallery; A Mosaic Journey by Judy Overholt Wheeler in the display case; and Kim Emert Gale and Janet Weaver: Through Our Eyes in the Atrium.

The Arts & Culture Alliance serves and supports a diverse community of artists, arts organizations, and cultural institutions. The Alliance receives financial support from the Tennessee Arts Commission, the City of Knoxville, and First Tennessee Foundation.

Sunday Morning by Bill Bailey

“Sunday Morning” by Bill Bailey is part of four exhibitions on display at the Emporium Center, 100 S. Gay Street, in downtown Knoxville. Exhibition hours are Monday-Friday, 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM and Sundays, June 5 & 19, 3:30-6:30 PM. Photo courtesy the artist.


TN Theatre announces Broadway season

KNOXVILLE, TN – The Tennessee Theatre has announced the 2016-2017 Broadway at the Tennessee Theatre season. Last year, Tennessee Theatre broke all house and box office records for sales and total attendance and welcomed approximately 34,000 people to the theatre.

“Part of the mission at The Tennessee Theatre is to offer diverse, high-quality entertainment, which includes bringing the best of Broadway to Knoxville,” says Becky Hancock, Executive Director of the Tennessee Theatre. “Broadway brings together long-time theatre attendees and first-timers to this beautiful venue, to experience a popular art form and create lasting memories in the Official State Theatre of Tennessee.”

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The 2016-2017 season at the historic Tennessee Theatre in downtown Knoxville kicks off with the Tony Award®-winning Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Cinderella, December 2-4, 2016.

For tickets, visit tennesseetheatre.com.


Dollar Night at Smokies Stadium

Tonight (May 16, 2016) at Smokies Stadium is McGhee Tyson Airport Dollar Monday. TN Smokies baseball fans will be able to purchase hot dogs, popcorn, small Pepsi products and programs for only one dollar. (From Knoxville, take I-40 East for a short 20 minutes to Exit 407 to get to Smokies Stadium. Parking is $5.)

After suffering a blowout loss to the Barons on Saturday night, the Smokies returned the favor Sunday afternoon as they topped Birmingham by a count of 12-4. Eight different Smokies recorded a hit in the win as C Victor Caratini led the way going 3-5 at the dish to go along with two RBI and two runs.

With their win, the Smokies record improves to 17-20 while the Barons dropped to 16-21 on the year.

While they were held scoreless in the second, the Smokies’ offense exploded for nine runs combined between the third and sixth innings. Candelario led off the third frame with a double then advanced to third after RF Billy McKinney (2-5, RBI, R) shot a single to left. Caratini hit a single of his own in the next at-bat that drove home Candelario and moved McKinney to scoring position. DH Kelly Dugan (2-2, 2 RBI, 2 BB) sent a shot off the center field wall for a double that scored both Caratini and McKinney to push the Smokies ahead 6-3. The Smokies added three more runs to their name in the bottom of the fourth.

The Smokies and Barons will do it all again tonight in game three of the five-game series with the first pitch set for 7:05 p.m. ET. The Smokies will give the ball to RHP Paul Blackburn (3-1, 1.02 ERA) while the Barons will turn to RHP Carson Fulmer (3-3, 5.45 ERA).

The Pilot Pre-Game Show will kick off the broadcast at 6:50 p.m. ET, leading up to the 7:05 p.m. ET first pitch from Smokies Stadium. Monday night’s broadcast can be heard on exclusively online at SmokiesBaseball.com or via the TuneIn Radio or MiLB First Pitch apps. The game can also be watched online via MiLB.tv.

Single-game tickets, as well as multi-voucher and season ticket packages are still available, and can be purchased online at smokiesbaseball.com, or by calling the Smokies Ticket Office at 865-286-2300.

ABOUT THE TENNESSEE SMOKIES
The Tennessee Smokies are the Double-A affiliate of the Chicago Cubs. Members of the ten-team Southern League, Smokies baseball has been entertaining families and fans of America’s national pastime in the East Tennessee region for over 100 years. To learn more about the Tennessee Smokies, visit www.smokiesbaseball.com.


Kid’s night out at the museum

KNOXVILLE—The McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, will host its first “Night at the McClung Museum” family sleepover from 7 p.m. Friday, June 17, 2016 to 8 a.m. Saturday, June 18.

The sleepover will provide children ages 5 to 11 and their parents the opportunity to spend an unforgettable night with dinosaurs and explore the museum’s new special exhibition, “Dinosaur Discoveries: Ancient Fossils, New Ideas,” on loan from the American Museum of Natural History, which reveals a vivid picture of what living, breathing dinosaurs were really like. The event also will feature family-friendly activities including dino-related crafts, a flashlight tour, games, a movie screening and bedtime stories.

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Tickets are $40 a person for museum members and $50 a person for nonmembers and include all activities and craft supplies, a survival pack with an exclusive event-themed bag, flashlight, evening snacks and supplies, and breakfast Saturday morning. Tickets may be purchased online or over the phone at 865-974-2144. Online ticket purchases will incur an additional processing fee. All children must be age 5 to 11 at the time of the sleepover and must be accompanied by an adult chaperone.

Participants can be dropped off and picked up in front of the museum, or parking passes will be available for $10 for those wishing to park their car overnight.

The McClung Museum is at 1327 Circle Park Drive. Museum admission is free, and the museum’s hours are 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Monday to Saturday and 1–5 p.m. Sundays. Groups may schedule tours by calling 865-974-2144 or emailing museum@utk.edu.

Free two-hour museum parking passes are available from the parking information building at the entrance to Circle Park Drive on weekdays by request. Free parking is available on Circle Park Drive on a first-come, first-served basis on weekends. Free public transportation to the museum is also available via the Knoxville Trolley Vol Line.


Stargazing event offered May 9

Marble Springs State Historic Site will host a stargazing workshop conducted by Gary Noland, adjunct instructor of Astronomy at the University of Tennessee on Monday, May 9, 2016, from 7 a.m. until 2:30 p.m. This workshop will feature the relatively rare astronomical event of Mercury’s transit across the sun. During the transit, Mercury will appear in silhouette as a small, dark dot moving in front of the sun. The last transit of Mercury occurred in 2006 and will not be seen again until 2019.

Guests are welcome to view this rare event through a special telescope provided by Mr. Noland. Proper eye protection is absolutely essential for watching the transit of Mercury, else you risk blindness or eye damage. For all guests planning to stay the duration of the workshop, packing a lunch is recommended.

Programming assistance for this event is provided by Knox County. Marble Springs is funded under an agreement with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Tennessee Historical Commission, and supplemented by additional funds raised by the Governor John Sevier Memorial Association.

All activities take place at Marble Springs State Historic Site: 1220 W. Governor John Sevier Highway, in Knoxville.

Marble Springs State Historic Site is the last remaining home of John Sevier. Born in Virginia in 1745, John Sevier made a name for himself as a Revolutionary War Hero during the Battle of Kings Mountain (1780), a key player and Governor of the short-lived State of Franklin (1784-1788), and ultimately was elected to serve as the first Governor of the State of Tennessee (1796).

This event is free, but donations are appreciated. Details are subject to change. For more information please call (865)573-5508, email info@marblesprings.net, or visit the Marble Springs website at www.marblesprings.net.


TN watercolors on display

The 35th Juried Exhibition of the Tennessee Watercolor Society will be hosted by the Arts and Culture Alliance of Greater Knoxville this year in the Balcony Gallery of the Emporium Center, 100 S. Gay Street, from May 20 to June 24, 2016.

Regular business hours are 9 am – 5 pm Monday through Friday. Extended hours to 7 pm on Friday, May 20, and 11 am to 3 pm on Saturday, May 21 accommodate the exhibition opening weekend activities. An early preview is available after the show is hung on May 13. Entrance into the Emporium is free and open to the public.

The Tennessee Watercolor Society (TnWS), founded in 1972, has represented the finest artists in the state for 44 years, having yearly juried exhibitions and more recently, biennial exhibitions. The 2016 Exhibition showcases 55 watermedia paintings chosen from close to 200 entries selected by the distinguished juror, John T. Salminen who is a signature member of numerous art societies, including the American Watercolor Society, the National Watercolor Society, and the Transparent Watercolor Society of America. He has won more than 220 national and international awards. His work is included in permanent collections in Asia, Europe and the United States.

His Life in a Song by Brenda Mills

His Life in a Song, by Brenda Mills. Watercolor on display for the 35th Juried Exhibition of the Tennessee Watercolor Society will be hosted by the Arts and Culture Alliance of Greater Knoxville this year in the Balcony Gallery of the Emporium Center, 100 S. Gay Street, from May 20 to June 24, 2016. Photo courtesy the artist.


Knoxville features Latino art

KNOXVILLE, TN – The Emporium Center welcomes the International Latino Art Exhibition in the main gallery, May 6-27, 2016. This exhibit is curated by Dina R. Ruta and features fifteen artists from five countries.

Organizers say this exhibition comes from a desire to innovate and give Latin American art a space and purpose here in Knoxville, promoting the integration of cultures in order to broaden the concept of art and establish it as a mode of communication. These exceptional contemporary artists have generated a dynamic dialogue that, together with the overwhelming power of color and varied gesture, consistent with the conception of it as a cultural symbol, transcends the chronological and geographical boundaries of the continent.

Featured artists include:

Argentina: Inés Barlasina, Ángel Barón Da conté, and José Utrera
Colombia: Jorge Yances
Honduras: Elías José Díaz Alcántara, Dennis Cerrato, Víctor López, Sergio Martínez, Santos Arzú Quinto, Omar Sánchez, and Iván Soto
México: Rafael Sáenz Félix and Héctor Saldívar
Venezuela: Ángel Blanco and Al Vanegas

A public reception will take place on Friday, May 6, from 5:00-9:00 PM to which the public is invited to meet the artists and view the artwork. Most of the works are for sale and may be purchased through the close of the exhibition. The First Friday reception also features a Jazz Jam Session hosted by Vance Thompson and Friends from 7:00-9:00 PM in the Black Box Theatre. Complimentary hors d’oeuvres and chocolate fondue from the Melting Pot will be available.

Painting by Sergio Martinez

Artwork by Sergio Martinez is part of the featured international exhibit at the Emporium Center in downtown Knoxville May 6-27, 2016. Photo courtesy Arts and Culture Alliance.


House Mountain offers great hiking

CELEBRATE KNOXVILLE – If you’re looking for a great place to enjoy the gorgeous spring weather in East Tennessee, you’ll want to hike House Mountain, a 500-acre natural area located in Knox County approximately eight miles from Knoxville. The hiking trails are short, but steep, challenging, and rewarding. The 2,100-foot crest of House Mountain provides great views of the Unakas and Cumberlands some 30 miles away, or northeast to the adjacent Clinch Mountain.

According to Knox County’s Department of Parks and Recreation, before erosion by Big Flat Creek, “the gently dipping bedrock layers underlying House Mountain once extended to Clinch Mountain, whose base lies approximately two and half miles to the northeast. The bedrock structure represents a large synclinal fold that formed during the Appalachian mountain building event called the Alleghenian Orogeny.”

The western trail to the crest is .8 miles and the eastern trail is 1.5 miles. The western trail is narrow, steep, and has a few turns that require careful negotiating. Both trails are connected at the top by the wider Crest Trail that is 1.5 miles long.

HouseMountainhikers

Many hikers bring their dogs with them on the trail on House Mountain. From time to time, a courteous wait is needed to allow hikers coming down and hikers going up enough room to pass one another. Photo by Celebrate Knoxville.

In a few places, the great sandstone boulders serve as resting places or picnic spots for hikers or artists sketching the chestnut oaks and mountain pines. Photographers are often seen kneeling in the moist dirt by streambeds to catch a close-up of wildflowers. The north-facing slopes support a forest of sugar maple, tulip poplar, ash, and buckeye.

Don’t forget the binoculars: House Mountain is also a favorite place for birdwatchers. Migrating hawks and warblers can be observed from the mountain. Ruffed grouse, pileated woodpeckers, scarlet tanagers, wild turkeys, and more than one hundred additional species of birds have been observed on the mountain.

Gurgling from the cool streams provide a musical backdrop for hikers making their way up the slopes. House Mountain is drained by several unnamed tributaries of Roseberry Creek and by Hogskin and Brice Branches, which divide it from the 1,500 feet high McAnnally Ridge, which lies to the east and south.

To get to House Mountain from Knoxville, Tennessee, take I-40 East. Exit on U.S. Highway 11W (Rutledge Pike) and go north and east on Rutledge Pike. After about 10 miles, look for the “House Mountain State Park” sign on the right side of the highway and then turn left on Idumea Road. Turn left on Hogskin Road. The parking area is less than a mile on the right. Restrooms are available next to the parking lot. There is no admission fee to hike the trails.

Benches and signage along the trails are provided in memory of John Evans, a Scout leader and founding member/active volunteer for Friends of House Mountain. Enjoy the trails and remember to Leave No Trace.

Editor’s Update April 2017: If you’re interested in more hiking opportunities, Brian Bradshaw has just published “Top 50 Long Distance Hiking Trails In The USA”. You can check it out here: https://bootbomb.com/info/hiking-trails/top-50-long-distance-hiking-trails-usa/

–Laura Long/CelebrateKnoxville.com


Dinosaurs return to Knoxville

Travel back in time 65 million years at “Discover the Dinosaurs” at the Knoxville Convention Center on Saturday and Sunday, April 2-3, 2016.

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Now in its fifth year at the Knoxville Convention Center, the interactive exhibition, “Discover the Dinosaurs,” is an educational family outing featuring 40 museum-quality and animatronic dinosaur replicas. Photo submitted.

“Every year at the Convention Center, thousands of kids attend ‘Discover the Dinosaurs’ with their families to learn and have fun,” General Manager Mary Bogert said. “The exhibition features hands-on attractions and lifelike animatronic replicas that move and roar. Kids feel like they are getting up close to living dinosaurs, and parents like that their children are learning about fossils and the prehistoric era.”

The event also features activities , such as Dino Dig, where children pretend to be archeologists hunting for fossils in sand; Dino Den, where young guests climb and interact with dinosaurs their size; Dino Theater, where educational and entertaining videos are shown; coloring station; mini-golf; inflatables; scavenger hunt with clues hidden throughout the exhibit; and Tyrannosaurus rex and Triceratops rides. Additional activities such as gem and fossil mining and face painting are available for an additional charge.

The exhibit is open Saturday, April 2, from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Sunday, April 3, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.

“Discover the Dinosaurs” tickets are $22 for children, age 2-12; $18 for 13 and up and adults; and $15 for seniors. Children under the age 2 may enjoy the exhibit for free. (Tickets available Convention Center box office the day of the event.)


Photography workshop offered

Marble Springs State Historic Site will host a photography workshop on April 23, 2016 at 11am. This event will take place at the Marble Springs State Historic Site: 1220 West Governor John Sevier Highway, Knoxville.

sevier-homestead

This workshop will be taught by Doug Mills, videographer for the award winning Heartland Series. At this workshop guests will be taking pictures of the scenic historic site while developing some basic photography techniques as well as their own artistic vision.

Cost is $20 per person with all proceeds going towards educational programing at Marble Springs.

For more information or to register please call 865-573-5508 or email info@marblesprings.net.


Star Wars at Knoxville Zoo

Knoxville Zoo is giving children ages 12 and under who come dressed as their favorite Star Wars character free admission on Saturday, March 19, 2016 from 10:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m. Star Wars characters will be meeting fans and posing for photos. The day will also feature a Jedi Training Camp for aspiring Padawans that includes light saber training and special instructions on how to use The Force, allowing each child to leave a certified Jedi Knight.

Visitors are encouraged to wear their own “Star Wars” attire to celebrate the occasion. Children ages 12 and under who come dressed as their favorite Star Wars character will receive free admission with a paid adult admission (limit one free child admission per adult admission). The opportunity to meet “Star Wars” characters is included with general zoo admission.

501 storm troopers 2edited

Knoxville Zoo will bring the big screen to life March 19 with help from the MidSouth Garrison of the 501st Legion, the preferred costuming organization of Lucasfilm Ltd., producer of the Star Wars film. Zoo Knoxville is a nonprofit entity situated on 53 wooded acres just east of downtown Knoxville.  Photo submitted.

Knoxville Zoo is open Monday through Friday from 9:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 9:30 a.m. until 6:00 p.m. Admission and ticket sales stop one-hour before the zoo closes. For more information visit zooknoxville.org.


New exhibit at Emporium

A new exhibition entitled “A Stitch in Time” by local artists Bobbie Crews and Judi Gaston, will be on display March 4-24, 2016 at the Emporium in downtown Knoxville.

“A Stitch in Time” combines fiber arts and mixed media to create a fascinating look into the resilient lives of women through the recycling of reality and relationships as well as materials. The works of Crews and Gaston overlap in their concern for women: the layers of who women are and how they exist and subsist in the larger political and material world.

A public reception will take place on Friday, March 4, from 5:00-9:00 PM to which the public is invited to meet the artists and view their works. The First Friday reception also features a Jazz Jam Session hosted by Vance Thompson and Friends from 7:00-9:00 PM in the Black Box Theatre. Complimentary hors d’oeuvres will be available.

4x6postcard

“A Stitch in Time” is on display March 4-24, 2016 in the Atrium at the Emporium Center, 100 S. Gay Street, in downtown Knoxville. Exhibition hours are Monday-Friday9:00 AM – 5:00 PM and Sundays, March 6 & 203:30-6:30 PM.


Free Day at McClung Museum

Families are invited to enjoy free programming throughout the month of February 2016 at UT’s McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture.

The museum will host a free Stroller Tour and activity from 10:00 to 11 a.m. Monday, February 8, 2016. This program will celebrate love around the world in honor of Valentine’s Day.

The tour is free and open to the public, but reservations are necessary and are first-come, first-served. Call 865-974-2144 to make a reservation.

The museum also will host a free Family Fun Day from 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. on Saturday, February 27. The tour and craft activities will celebrate African American History Month and will focus on Tennessee artist William Edmondson (1874–1951)—a well-known sculptor and the first African American artist to have a solo show at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Visitors can participate in tours and will work on a take-home craft.

The McClung Museum is located at 1327 Circle Park Drive. Museum admission is free, and the museum’s hours are 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday to Saturday and 1:00 to 5:00 p.m. on Sundays. Free two-hour museum parking passes are available from the parking kiosk at the entrance to Circle Park Drive during the week. Free parking is available on the weekends.

Free public transportation to the museum is available via the Knoxville Trolley Vol Line.


McCullough blends art and design

Artist Kate McCullough of Fountain City went back to painting in watercolors 13 years ago after studying art in college and enjoying years in a career in interior design. She says that art and design relate to each other and complement one another, and that probably explains why she enjoyed teaching Feng Shui, the art of arranging a home for the ideal flow of energy.

“The same principles apply in art as they do in interior design,” McCullough told Celebrate Knoxville in a phone interview this morning. “When I returned to school, I immediately fell in love with (how watercolors looked) while taking courses at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. I remember going into the art supplies store and thinking how much I wanted to learn to use watercolors. I can’t really explain what I love about them; I just love how they look.”

Kate McCullough, whose husband Roy is also an artist, says that the couple travel as often as they can and get inspiration on the road.

“We have been around the U.S. and Europe already but we would love to visit Japan and study the art there,” she says. “I am not really a landscape artist but I do enjoy painting urban settings, trains, still life scenes.”

McCullough’s work is among those featured at the upcoming Blount County Public Library’s Knoxville Watercolor Society art exhibit, February 1 through February 29, 2016.

“I joined the Knoxville Watercolor Society in 2009 and found the organization to be very useful to me as an artist,” she says. “They have five or six shows per year that members get to participate in plus I enjoy sharing and learning from other artists in the group. After the show in Blount County, we have shows scheduled in Knoxville at The Emporium and at the Knoxville Museum of Art.”

tennesseegold

Tennessee Gold, watercolor by Fountain City artist Kate McCullough. 

McCullough says the above watercolor painting “Tennessee Gold” was from a photo she took of a shelf in Downtown Wine and Spirits, a business located in downtown Knoxville on Gay Street.

“I asked if I could take some photos in their store, and they said yes,” she says. “The painting of the moonshine jars is a favorite among fans of my work and I think that is because it speaks so much of the history of this area.”

McCullough’s work was featured in last year’s juried exhibition, Artclamation! at the Lighthouse Events Center. She is also a member of the Art Market Gallery, The Tennessee Watercolor Society and Fountain City Art Guild. She teaches painting classes at the Fountain City Art Center on a regular basis.

For more information, visit the artist web site at http://www.katemcculloughwaterart.com/

Regular hours for the Blount County Public Library exhibit of the Knoxville Watercolor Society is Monday through Thursday, 9 am to 9 pm, and Friday through Saturday, 9 am to 5:30 pm. Sunday the library is open from 1 pm to 5:30 pm.

The Blount County Public Library is located at 508 North Cusick Street, in Maryville.

 

 


Knoxville gallery features Jewish art

KNOXVILLE, TN – The grand re-opening of Knoxville’s Schwarzbart Gallery opening will be held Sunday, January 31, 2016, at 6800 Deane Hill Drive, from 3 to 5pm. This is a free event, open to the community and members of all faiths. Hors d’oeuvres and a celebratory champagne toast will be served.

Generations of Knoxville’s Jews have used the Arnstein Jewish Community Center (AJCC) as a social and cultural gathering place. Since 1929, its mission has remained: To serve the spiritual, social, and educational needs of all Knoxville Jews.

Recently, the Knoxville Jewish Alliance (KJA) launched a campaign to update and improve the AJCC facility, making it more accessible to those with mobility limitations, in addition to completing some long overdue cosmetic updates.

The Schwarzbart Gallery – a permanent tribute to Judaic artisan Arnold’s Schwarzbart’s works – represents the anchor of the first phase of these updates, to be enjoyed by the entire community.

“I can think of no better way to begin our AJCC renewal and improvement process than with the installation of the Schwarzbart Gallery,” said Adam Brown, KJA President. Given how much Arnold cared about our community, combined with the fact that he was so highly regarded in his field as a Judaic artist, I feel this gallery is a perfect opportunity to recognize an outstanding individual who truly enriched our lives through his generosity, his art, and his love for our Jewish community.”

shtender

Arnold Schwarzbart’s works can now be found in Jewish homes and institutions throughout the world, are current and modern (reflecting his architectural training) while they also invoke feelings of an ancient history and shared past. (Image: The Shtender, by Arnold Schwarzbart, submitted.)


Farmer returns to Square Room

KNOXVILLE – Vocalist Kayley Farmer returns to Jazz Lunch Series at the Square Room on January 6, 2015, to present selections from the beloved songbook of composer Richard Rodgers and lyricist Lorenz Hart.

The pair collaborated on more than 500 songs for 28 different musicals over the course of their careers. Songs to be included in the program include “Everything I’ve Got,” “Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered,” “This Can’t Be Love,” “My Romance,” “Thou Swell” and others.

Kayley Farmer

Vocalist Kayley Farmer
The Square Room is located in downtown Knoxville, TN in the Historic Market Square district. It is housed in the rear of the 4 Market Square Building along with its counterpart Café 4, a full-service restaurant and coffee bar.

Admission to the concert is $15 and includes a lunch buffet at noon.


Survey studies arts and culture

The Arts Mean Business. That is the message being delivered today by the Arts & Culture Alliance of Greater Knoxville, who announced it has joined the Arts & Economic Prosperity 5, a national study measuring the economic impact of nonprofit arts and culture organizations and their audiences.

In Greater Knoxville, the research study is being conducted by Americans for the Arts (AFTA), the nation’s nonprofit organization advancing the arts and arts education in partnership with the Arts & Culture Alliance and the Tennessee Arts Commission, the state’s arts agency. This is the fifth national study over the past 20 years to measure the impact of arts and culture spending on local jobs, income paid to local residents, and revenue generated to local and state governments. This will be the Alliance’s first time to participate.

As one of nearly 300 study partners across all 50 states plus the District of Columbia, the Alliance will collect economic impact data from local nonprofits that offer arts and culture programming both formal and informal. “This study will show how nonprofit arts and culture are an important industry in our community—employing people locally, purchasing goods and services from local merchants, and helping to drive tourism and economic development,” said Liza Zenni, Executive Director of the Arts & Culture Alliance.

The Alliance will also collect surveys from attendees at arts and cultural events. Previous national studies have shown that the average attendee spends $24.60 per person, per event, beyond the cost of admission. Those studies have also shown that, on average, 32 percent of arts attendees travel from outside the county in which the arts event took place, and that those cultural tourists typically spend nearly $40 per person—generating important revenue for local businesses and demonstrating how the arts drive revenue for other businesses in the community.

Surveys will be collected throughout calendar year 2016. The results of the study will be released in June of 2017.

 


Art Gallery features new works

Recent works by painter Lil Clinard and fiber artist Julia Malia will be on display Dec. 28 through Dec. 31 at the Art Market Gallery. An opening reception for the featured artists will begin at 5:30 p.m., Jan. 1 , with complimentary refreshments and music performed by Patrick Mulligan during Downtown Knoxville’s monthly First Friday Art Walk.

Lil Clinard is a member of the Knoxville Watercolor Society, Tennessee Watercolor Society, Tennessee Artists Association (Past President), the Tellico Village Art Guild (Past President), Oak Ridge and Fountain City Art Centers. Her original art hangs in corporate and private collections throughout the Southeast and is on display at the Art Market Gallery 422 S. Gay Street, Knoxville TN.

Malia Pocket Scarf 3

Julia Malia is a fiber, jewelry, and stained glass craftswoman as well as a watercolorist and musician. Her fiber works will be on display at the upcoming Art Market Gallery exhibit Dec. 28 through Dec. 31, 2015. Photo submitted.

Malia is a juried member of the Foothills Craft Guild as both a fiber artist (specializing in knitting and crocheting) and a jewelry maker. She is also a member of the Tennessee Valley Handspinners Guild, the Precious Metal Clay Guild of East Tennessee, and the Fountain City Art Center.

Owned and operated by more than 60 professional regional Tennessee artists, the Art Market gallery, at 422 S. Gay St. Holiday hours are 11 a.m. To 6 p.m. Monday through Thursday and Saturday; 11 a.m. To 9 p.m. Friday; and 1 to 5 p.m. Sunday.

The gallery is wheelchair accessible and parking in the abutting garage and on the street is free on weekends and after 6 p.m. Weekdays. For more information, call The Art Market Gallery at 865-525-5265.

 


Tiger Lily presents A Doll’s House

Knoxville’s Tiger Lily Theatre Company is pleased to present Henrik Ibsen’s timeless play “A Doll’s House.” Performances are Friday, December 11, 2015 at 8pm, Saturday, December 12th at 8pm, and Sunday, December 13th at 2pm. Tickets are $15 for adults, $12 for students.

Reimagined against a post-depression American backdrop, this this production of Ibsen’s most famous play highlights the timelessness of a woman’s struggle against the confines of societal norms and a marriage that is not what it seems.

Featuring a cast of local actors, this production will take place at Broadway Academy of Performing Arts, 706 N. Broadway St, for one weekend only. Parking is available at the rear of Broadway Academy on Lamar St.

Tiger Lily Theatre is dedicated to furthering opportunities for women in the Knoxville arts community and was recently selected to represent the state of Tennessee in the 2016 Southeastern Theatre Conference Community Theatre Festival Competition.

Tiger Lily currently produces two performances per season, including a series of short, original works in the spring. Submissions for the short play production are accepted via email at tigerlilytheatre@yahoo.com.

 


Knoxville Zoo adds Santa Village

Knoxville, Tenn. – Santa Claus will be available to hear Christmas wishes and pose for holiday photos Thursday, Dec. 3 through Sunday, Dec. 6 and Thursday, Dec. 10 through Sunday, Dec. 13, 2015 from 10:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m. each day.  Guests may bring their own cameras for photos or purchase portraits taken by a professional photographer.

Located indoors at the Pilot Flying J Wee Play Adventure play area, the halls of Santa’s Village are all decked for the holidays with dozens of trees and thousands of lights.  Guests can celebrate the season with special yuletide crafts, creative play and encounters with special animal visitors throughout the day.

Santa's Village

Santa’s Village is included with general Knoxville Zoo admission.  Currently, the zoo is offering buy one, get one free tickets through February 29, 2016 during Kroger BOGO Days. Photo submitted.

Knoxville Zoo is Knoxville’s largest year-round attraction.  Located off exit 392 from Interstate 40, the zoo is open every day except Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. Knoxville Zoo is nationally accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) and is committed to the highest standards in animal care and well-being, ethics, conservation, and education. Currently, the zoo is open daily from 10:00 a.m. until 4:30 p.m.  Admission and ticket sales stop one-hour before the zoo closes. For more information, please call 865.637.5331 ext. 300 or visit www.knoxvillezoo.org.


Knoxville ice rink opens Nov 27

Knoxville’s only open-air ice rink opens to the public in Market Square, downtown Knoxville, on Friday, Nov. 27, 2015. In celebration of its 10th anniversary, the rink is extending its season by 15 days and will be open Friday, Nov. 27, through Monday, Jan. 18, 2016.

“This is an exciting time for Holidays on Ice,” City of Knoxville Director of Special Events Judith Foltz said. “For the first time in many years, the rink will be completely open air. We’re removing the tent, enhancing the rink with overhead lighting and extending the season by 15 days.”

Admission price includes entry fee, skate rental and unlimited time on ice:

1 Day Ticket Adult $10
1 Day Ticket Children Age 12 & Under $7
Season Pass Adult $45
Season Pass Children Age 12 & Under $30

RINK HOURS:

Regular Hours Nov. 27 – Dec. 20 and Jan. 4-18
Monday thru Thursday 4 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Friday and Saturday 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Sunday 1 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Parking is free at all city-owned garages after 6 p.m. on weekdays and throughout the weekend, except for specific special events. City-owned garages include the Locust Street garage, the State Street garage and the Market Square garage.

Holidays on Ice is sponsored by Home Federal Bank.


Dollar Days at Knoxville Zoo

Knoxville, Tenn. – Knoxville Zoo’s Dollar Days are scheduled for Nov. 12, 13, 14 and 15, 2015.

At the time of this writing, Saturday, Nov. 14 and Sunday, Nov. 15 are already sold out and a limited number of tickets remain for Thursday, Nov. 12 and Friday, Nov. 13.

During the Dollar Days event, general admission tickets for ages two and up are $1 each and parking is free. To ensure a safe and pleasant experience for Dollar Days guests, a limited number of tickets are available for each day, and advance purchase is required.

Knoxville Zoo encourages Dollar Days attendees bring a donation to help other local non-profit organizations Mission of Hope, Young-Williams Animal Center, and the Office on Aging’s Knox PAWS program. Mission of Hope is a volunteer organization providing assistance, aid and resources to those living in poverty-stricken areas in rural Appalachia. Young-Williams Animal Center serves the community by providing compassionate care to animals, working to find homes for adoptable pets, providing affordable spaying and neutering services, and educational programs about animal welfare. The Knox PAWS program works with area animal shelters to match senior pets with senior citizens.

Dollar Days tickets are valid only for the date printed on the ticket and no rain checks will be offered for this special event. Tickets will not be sold the day of the event. Dollar Days will take place rain or shine.

For more information, call 865.637.5331 ext. 300.


Ramsey House plans holiday events

Historic Ramsey House will hold its Annual Candlelight Tour on Sunday, December 13, 2015 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Enjoy holiday treats, Christmas carols, and tours of the beautifully decorated, historic home. Admission is free, but donations are appreciated.

The annual Ramsey House wreath workshop will be held on Saturday, December 12, 2015 starting at 12:30 p.m. with refreshments; instruction begins at 1 p.m. Attendees need to bring a pair of small garden shears and garden gloves. Every year Julia Shiflett and her “wreath elves” pick the finest fresh greens and holly berries, tie beautiful bows, and find the most fragrant cloves and oranges for participants to make a beautiful holiday wreath and pomander.The cost of the workshop is $35 per person. For more information or reservations, call Historic Ramsey House at 865-546-0745.

Christmas Dinner with the Ramsey’s will be held December 4-8 starting at 6:30 p.m. each night. Each evening will feature a candlelight tour of the beautifully decorated home and lovely holiday dinner prepared by Rosa’s Catering. The dinner will be held in the 1797 home of Francis Alexander Ramsey, his wife Peggy, and their children. This is a great opportunity to entertain the special people in your life, employees, or clients. Seating for a total of twenty guests in the dining room and the parlor is available each evening, and individual ticket purchases are also welcome. All proceeds go directly to Historic Ramsey House. Reservations are a must and will be taken on a first-come, first-serve basis. Tickets are $125 per person ($100 of the cost is a tax-deductible donation). For more information or reservations, call Historic Ramsey House at 865-546-0745.


Grainger Foundation donates to IJAMS

The Grainger Foundation has donated $5,000 to Ijams Nature Center, Inc. in support of its new adaptive programming series for people with physical and developmental disabilities.

“This gift will help launch our new adaptive paddling program on the Mead’s Quarry Lake and Tennessee River,” said Paul James, Executive Director of Ijams. “We will be able to open up opportunities for people of all ability levels to experience the outdoors in ways that have not been possible before at Ijams. We are grateful to The Grainger Foundation for its generosity.”

The donation will support the purchase of seats, braces, and paddles, as well as provide funding for staff training. In the future, Ijams hopes to expand adaptive recreational programming to include hiking, rock climbing, and more.

This donation was recommended by Russell Rumpp, Market Manager of W.W. Grainger, Inc.’s, Knoxville region. Grainger has been a part of the Knoxville business community for nearly 60 years as the leading broad line supplier of maintenance, repair, and operating products. “We are proud to support the adaptive programs offered by Ijams Nature Center,” says Rumpp. “We understand the need for everyone in our community to have the opportunity to experience the natural world around them.”

The Grainger Foundation, an independent, private foundation based in Lake Forest, Illinois, was established in 1949 by William W. Grainger, founder of W.W. Grainger, Inc.

Ijams Nature Center is a 300-acre urban greenspace encouraging stewardship of the natural world by providing engaging outdoor experiences for people of all ages.

Grainger check presentation
Grainger Market Manager Russell Rumpp presents check to Ijams Executive Director Paul James. Also pictured: Benjy Darnell, local climber, and Laura Jones, adaptive paddling volunteer. Photo submitted.


McClung Museum hosts holiday sale

Knoxville’s McClung Museum will hold its annual sale Nov. 3–10, 2015. Shoppers will find savings on fall and holiday items, books, and toys. New items from local artists including handmade wooden pens, unique jewelry, prints and pottery also will be available.

Proceeds from the sale support the McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture’s educational programs, which reach thousands of university and K-12 students in the East Tennessee region each year.

Sale items will be available while supplies last. Some exclusions will apply.

The McClung Museum and the Museum Store are open 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 1–5 p.m. Sundays.

Complimentary parking is available in front of the museum on Circle Park Drive on a first come, first served basis.

Free public transportation to the museum is available via the Knoxville Trolley Vol Line.


Regal to locate new HQ in Knoxville

Regal Entertainment Group has announced the company will locate its new corporate headquarters on Knoxville’s South Waterfront. Regal, which operates the largest and most geographically diverse U.S. theater circuit, expects to create 75 new jobs.
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Regal Entertainment (shown here in the Gay Street location) will locate their new headquarters in a nine-story, 178,000-square-foot building along Knoxville’s South Waterfront. File photo by Celebrate Knoxville.

Knoxville leaders praised the collaborative effort to bring Regal to Knoxville’s waterfront as well the economic impact the company has on the East Tennessee community.

“Regal Entertainment has deep roots in East Tennessee and is a great corporate citizen and partner,” Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero said. “This is a fantastic opportunity to bring a major corporate headquarters to our rapidly redeveloping South Waterfront, and to keep hundreds of high-paying jobs here in Knoxville. Thanks to Regal, Governor Haslam, (TNECD) Commissioner Boyd, (Knox County) Mayor Burchett, TVA and Southeastern Development Associates for working with us to put this project together.”

Regal Entertainment Group operates 7,357 screens in 571 theaters in 42 states along with Guam, American Samoa and the District of Columbia. The Company operates theaters in 46 of the top 50 U.S. designated market areas.


UT Gardens adds art to landscapes

What do bicycles, bedsprings, bottles and bald cypress have in common? According to Jason Reeves, curator of the UT Gardens Jackson, they all make exciting additions to your landscape!

On Monday, October 26, 2015 Reeves will share stories of his artful garden concoctions and favorite landscape additions. Whether he’s including used appliances or under-used plants…Jason’s designs never look like anyone else’s. He’ll give two talks in Room 125 of the Ellington Plant Sciences Building on the UT Ag Campus (for directions http://www.utk.edu/maps/) beginning at 6:30 p.m. Detailed descriptions of Jason’s talks are as follows:

One Man’s Trash is Another Man’s Treasure
Jason is known for his use of what many would consider “trash” at the UT Gardens Jackson. Working with limited funds, he has found inventive ways to bring whimsy into the Gardens which draw thousands of visitors annually. When used in the right context, old satellite dishes, bicycles, cook stoves and bedsprings can make an unusual but surprisingly tasteful addition to any garden. In 2014 and 2015 Jason included more than 6000 recycled glass bottles in the landscape. Come see how Jason uses “trash” to create gardens filled with imaginative art that sets off the show stopping plant collections in the UT Gardens.

Great Garden Plants – Jason will focus on dependable new and older underutilized great plant performers. Covering annuals, perennial, tropicals, trees and shrubs that will perform in your garden for years to come. Plants like Clematis ‘Roogucchi’, ‘Iron Butterfly’ iron weed, Jasmine ‘Fiona Sunrise’, Phlox ‘Minnie Pearl’, ‘Summer Chocolate’ mimosa tree, ‘Sun King’ Aralia, ‘Don Egolf’ Chinese redbud, Hydrangea paniculata ‘Baby Lace’ and ‘Peve Minaret’ bald cypress.

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After growing up on a farm in West Tennessee, Jason Reeves received his master’s degree in ornamental horticulture and landscape design from the University of Tennessee.  In 2002, Jason became the research horticulturist and curator of the UT Gardens Jackson. Photo submitted.


Clarence Brown lab presents Mr Burns

Clarence Brown Theatre’s Lab presents “Mr. Burns, a Post-Electric Play,” from October 28 to November 15, 2015.

“This play provides us with a wonderful opportunity – the chance to think about and celebrate the things that keep us human, in the fullest sense of the word, as we move into an increasingly unpredictable and unnerving future,” said director Casey Sams.

Casey Sams (Director) is head of undergraduate studies in Theatre at UT, where she works with both graduate and undergraduates teaching Movement and Acting. The cast is comprised of UT Theatre MFA candidate Melissa David (Colleen/Bart) and the following UT Theatre undergraduate students: Emily Helton (Edna Krabapple/Chorus); Robert Parker Jenkins (Matt/Homer); Hannah Jones (Quincy/Marge); Ellen Nikbakht (Jenny/Itchy); Benjamin Pratt (Sam/Scratchy); Ethan Roeder (Gibson/Mr. Burns); and, Lauran Winder (Maria Lisa).

With a dual mission to train the next generation of theatre artists and to provide top quality professional theatre, the Clarence Brown Theatre at the University of Tennessee Knoxville is one of only 13 academic LORT (League of Resident Theatre) institutions in the nation.


Fossil Day at McClung Museum

KNOXVILLE—In celebration of International Archaeology Day and National Fossil Day, the McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture hosts a free and family friendly event with activities about archaeology and fossils. The event will be held on Sunday, October 11, 2015 from 1:30 to 5:00 p.m. at the museum.

University of Tennessee archaeologists, paleontologists, and geologists and their graduate students will host displays about their projects locally and around the world. They will be on hand to talk with visitors about their work and offer hands-on activities demonstrating their research. Visitors can also bring artifacts, rocks, and fossils to the museum for identification by experts.

The event will also have a number of activities for children, including make-and-take Roman-style shield decorating, writing names in Egyptian hieroglyphs, identifying plant remains in sandboxes, matching animal bones, and making Roman “coins”. Additionally there will be short, interactive presentations for adults and children about caves, fossil crocodiles, a day in the life of a Roman soldier, and exploring Mars.

All activities are free and open to the public, and reservations are not required.

The museum is located at 1327 Circle Park Drive on the University of Tennessee campus. The museum is open Monday through Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and Sundays from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Parking passes are not needed on the weekends.

 


Knoxville Ice Bears 2015-2016 season

The Knoxville Ice Bears start the 2015-2016 season with their annual Free Agent Showcase on October 9, 2015 followed by main training camp which will be kicking off on October 14.

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The Knoxville Ice Bears will play their only exhibition home game on Saturday, October 17 as they host the Fayetteville FireAntz at 7:30pm at the Knoxville Civic Auditorium Coliseum in downtown Knoxville. The venue is located at 500 Howard Baker Jr. Blvd. and offers convenient parking across the street. File photo by Celebrate Knoxville. 

The Knoxville Ice Bears officially drop the puck on the 2015-2016 season on Saturday, October 24 when they raise their fourth SPHL Championship banner in 10 years.

Earlier this year, Knoxville Ice Bears announced the hiring of Cole Burkhalter as the Director of Hockey Development. Burkhalter, a 2008 graduate of the University of Tennessee and earning his master’s degree from Canisius College, worked as the Assistant to Hockey Administration for the Boston Bruins of the National Hockey League. While working with the Bruins, he helped the organization to a Northeast Division Championship in 2012 and to the Stanley Cup Final in 2013.

“I am thrilled to add another former member of the NHL to our staff as now he joins a former Pittsburgh Penguin as well as my background with the Philadelphia Flyers” said team President and GM Mike Murray.

 


Fire and Fright at Ramsey House

Bring your blanket or stadium chair, favorite roasting stick and join the staff of the historic Ramsey House in Knoxville for a very special October 2015 event, Fire and Fright. This event will kick off the Halloween season with the telling of ghost stories around a roaring bonfire. There will be hot dogs to roast and s’mores to enjoy for all in attendance. Pellissippi Community College students will be writing original ghost tales as an English project and will share them with attendees.

The Ramsey House Fire and Fright takes place Saturday October 10, from 7:30-9:30 pm.

Admission is $10 for adults, children 12 and under free. Admission includes a hot dog, beverage and s’mores package for all attendees including children.

Also known as Swan Pond, Ramsey House was constructed circa 1797 by English architect Thomas Hope for Colonel Francis Alexander Ramsey (1764–1820), whose family operated a plantation at the site until the U.S. Civil War. In 1969, the house was added to the National Register of Historic Places for its architecture and its role in the region’s early 19th-century history.

Historic Ramsey House is located at 2614 Thorngrove Pike, Knoxville.

For more information, call (865) 546-0745.

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Rambler train rides feature banjo music

KNOXVILLE – The Three Rivers Rambler is in full fall 2015 mode for train rides featuring live music by banjo player Matt A. Foster.

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Matt Foster brings audiences Appalachian-tinged renditions of various songs and ballads in between country blues-fused originals. He is an entertainer for both the young and old. Foster plays a fretless mountain banjo, harmonica, and the sole of his boot. Photo submitted.

Tickets for fall excursion, the Hoot N’ Holler Autumn Express are now available online.

Enjoy the crisp, fall air and apple cider at our new depot on the outskirts of downtown Knoxville and ride along the Tennessee River. Keep an eye out for wildlife along the river and fields as we pass historic sites such as McNutt Farm and Lebanon-in-the-Forks Presbyterian Church.

2015 Hoot N’ Holler Schedule

Saturday October 24 at 10am, 1pm and 4pm
Sunday October 25 at 1pm and 4pm
Saturday October 31 at 10am, 1pm and 4pm
Sunday November 1 at at 1pm and 4pm

Visit www.threeriversrambler.com.


Art Gone Wild at Knoxville Zoo

Knoxville Zoo will be hosting a special after-hours event featuring original art and craft created by the zoo’s animal “artists”. Art Gone Wild!, a special show and sale of original paintings and customized gift items will be held on Friday, October 2, 2015, from 6:00 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. at Knoxville Zoo.

Art Gone Wild! attendees can enjoy wine, beer and hors d’oeuvres while shopping for original works of art and craft created by the zoo’s animals as part of the zoo’s animal enrichment program. The offering includes paintings by Southern white rhinos, South African penguins, African elephants, zebras, gibbons, chimpanzees, Western lowland gorillas, baboons, African lions, Malayan and Bengal tigers, red pandas, a variety of reptiles, and some very clever birds including Einstein, the zoo’s famous Congo African grey parrot. Craft items decorated by the animals, including coasters, cups, tote and gift bags and hats, and original photography by Wendell Hackler will be available for purchase during the event.

All proceeds from Art Gone Wild! fund the zoo’s enrichment program, which is an integral part of the zoo’s animal husbandry practices that ensures the physical and psychological well-being of the animals in the zoo’s care.

For more information, call 865.637.5331 ext. 300.

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FilmMakers blend real with imaginary fears

Looking to find an authentic, blood-curdling good fright for Halloween, five friends set off on a road trip in an RV to track down underground Haunted House attractions. That’s the basic plot of The Houses October Built, an American found footage horror film showing on Netflix (at the time of this writing). With autumn in the air and Halloween on the horizon, CelebrateKnoxville.com spoke with the director Bobby Roe and producer Zack Andrews about the movie, which is actually multiple projects.

The first project is a real documentary about haunted house attractions in the U.S. that was produced in 2011. The second is a horror movie made in 2014, a fictional account of a group of people visiting those same haunted attractions and includes footage from the first project.

Confused yet? That’s part of the plan. As the lines between real and imagined horrors becomes more blurry in modern society, Roe and Andrews are making the most of mixing it up for horror fans in a way that is fresh and unique. Both the documentary and the fiction story are packaged together on the Blue-Ray of The Houses October Built, so that fans can see behind the scenes of actual places and learn more about the inspiration for the movie.

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The movie is the directorial debut of Bobby Roe, who also starred. It was produced by Zack Andrews (who also starred) and Steven Schneider, whose hits include Paranormal Activity, Insidious, and The Devil Inside. The film was given a limited theatrical release on October 10, 2014 and was released to home video on January 6, 2015.

“I think the quote at the beginning of the film, of how the real horror is what humans do to other humans, that explains our approach,” Roe said. “These are real locations, real scare actors. People can visit these places and talk to the same people we talked to when we made the movie. We wanted to make it as organic and real as possible.”

Real performances by great actors also make this film memorable, and Brandy Schaefer already won the award for Best Actress in The Macabre Faire Film Festival for her performance in The Houses October Built. The only female included on the RV trip, Shaefer’s descent from confidence into shock is crucial to the story and ties the other characters together. Fears mount up as it becomes obvious that the hauntings are getting out of control.

“It was a balancing act,” Roe said. “We asked ourselves ‘can we take (Brandy) to the breaking point without having the audience turn on the other characters?'”

Online reviews of the film describe the story as ‘a slow burn,’ with an emphasis on character development and not body count. Both Roe and Andrews say that is intentional and acknowledge that (Producer) Steven Schneider also used a slow burn with his Paranormal Activity movies, to much success.

Even with a slow build to a horrific ending, the movie is not without comic relief, however, and one scene with Zack Andrews features a cannabis-smoking-donut-eating-crying fit with infectious laughter.

“People ask me if I was actually high during that scene but I was not,” Andrews said. “We were just joking around on the set one day and decided to make the most of that moment.”

Cinematographer Andrew Strahorn does an excellent job of making this movie feel like a nightmare, blending real action with staged action. Some of the movie takes place during Mardis Gras, with even more masked characters and performance art adding to the atmosphere of weirdness.

“It was always our plan to include that in the story,” Andrews said. “Mardi Gras is a unique atmosphere and you just can’t fake that.”

This movie won the Carnet Jove Jury Award for Best Feature Length Film from the Midnight X-Treme Category from the Sitges Film Festival, but perhaps the most exciting news for horror fans is that the story of Houses That October Built continues: Roe and Andrews have recently returned from Scotland and other haunted places in the U.K. and plan to return again in the Spring. Roe said some of the haunted attractions there rival the best and most extreme in the United States, and they plan to make the most of what they have learned for another movie.

“Let’s just say that what you’ve seen of The Houses October Built is more of an intermission than an ending,” Roe said.
—Laura Long, CelebrateKnoxville.com, Sept. 16, 2015.


Knoxville Zoo hosts Halloween event

Knoxville Zoo is hosting 2015 BOO! at the Zoo, 12 nights of safe and not-too-scary Halloween fun for kids and young at heart on October 8-11, 15-18, 22-25, 2015 from 5:30 – 8:00 p.m.

Each night of Boo! at the Zoo will have a variety of entertainment including trick or treating along the Boo! trail, dancing with some of your favorite costumed characters, carnival games, the Zoo Boo Choo Choo and the only “haunted” carousel in East Tennesee, the Scary-Go-Round. (How can you tell it’s haunted? It goes backwards, of course.)

Tickets are $8 per person and children under 2 are free. Parking is $5.

Editor’s Note: Costumes are highly encouraged, but toy guns are not permitted at Boo at the Zoo.

Zoo members receive a $2 discount on BOO! admission and FREE parking. Not a member? Call 865-637-5331.

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Alive After Five celebrates milestone

Alive After Five, the live music series at the Knoxville Museum of Art, will celebrate its 22nd anniversary with a performance by Jenna & Her Cool Friends on Friday, September 18, from 6:00-8:30 pm.

Since 1993, and years before the resurgence of downtown, Alive After Five has been attracting people to Knoxville from the Knox County periphery and surrounding counties to enjoy live music, food, spirits, and art in the casually elegant atmosphere of the Knoxville Museum of Art. The early Friday evening program has been a great way to wind down from the work week or to start the weekend or both. Mostly showcasing the rich treasure trove of local and regional musical talent, Alive After Five has also presented acts from New Orleans, Boston, Dallas, Canada, Peru, France, Japan, Australia, and more. Food is available from a variety of area restaurants or caterers, and there are two cash bars.

02b Jenna & Her Cool Friends May 23

Alive After Five presents Jenna & Her Cool Friends, a seven-member blues and boogie band from Knoxville, featuring vocalist Jenna Jefferson, vocalist and harmonica player Michael “Crawdaddy” Crawley, rhythm guitarist Keith Ford, pianist Ben Maney, bassist Glyn Loyd, drummer Kevin Redding, and lead guitarist Michael Jordan. Photo submitted.

Admission to the 22nd Anniversary of Alive After Five is $10 for general admission, $5 for college students with valid ID, and free for museum members and children ages 17 and under.


Gala raises funds for KMA

The Guild of the Knoxville Museum of Art presents Art Fair KMA 2015 September 25-27, 2015. This second annual event raises funds to support the museum and presents art for sale by artists from the region and across the United States.

Friday, September 25: A Vernissage/Opening Preview and Sale takes place from 6 to 9pm. This gala event includes a cocktail party, silent auction, and VIP access to art for sale. Tickets are $95 per person and may be purchased online at http://www.knoxart.org/events/art-fair-kma.html.

Saturday, September 26 & Sunday, September 27: The Art Fair takes place the following Saturday (10am-6pm) and Sunday (12noon-4pm) and is free and open to the public. Visitors can enjoy individual artist booths featuring original art, free art and craft activities for children, and free photo booth. Founding sponsor of Art Fair KMA is Smoky Mountain Harley Davidson.

For more information, visit www.knoxart.org or email artfairkma@gmail.com.

The Knoxville Museum of Art celebrates the art and artists of East Tennessee, presents new art and new ideas, serves and educates diverse audiences, and enhances Knoxville’s quality of life. The museum is located in downtown Knoxville at 1050 World’s Fair Park and is open to the public Tuesday through Saturday 10am–5pm, and Sunday 1pm-5pm. Admission and parking are free. For more information, contact Angela Thomas at 865.934.2034 or visit www.knoxart.org.


Event raises funds for historic Knoxville

The Historic Homes of Knoxville are pleased to invite the public to a luncheon on Thursday, October 1, 2015, at 11:30 AM at The Foundry to celebrate the founding of the City of Knoxville 224 years ago. Knoxville’s key leaders will come together to celebrate and promote the city and its most precious properties, including Blount Mansion, Crescent Bend, Ramsey House, James White’s Fort, Mabry-Hazen, Marble Springs State Historic Site, and Historic Westwood.

Tennessee Department of Tourist Development commissioner Kevin Triplett will be the featured speaker. Triplett, was appointed to Gov. Bill Haslam’s cabinet as commissioner of the Department of Tourist Development in March of 2015. Triplett, 49, was most recently vice president of public affairs for Bristol Motor Speedway. Prior to joining BMS in 2005, he worked in various roles for NASCAR, ultimately serving as managing director of business operations, guiding the operation and administration of NASCAR’s Sprint Cup Series, Nationwide Series, and Camping World Truck Series. He has twice been named one of NASCAR’s “25 Most Influential” by The Charlotte Observer.

Proceeds from the luncheon will benefit the Historic Homes. Purchase tickets by calling 865-523-7543 by September 24.


Feast with the Beasts at Knoxville Zoo

Knoxville – Feast with the Beasts, presented by ORNL Federal Credit Union, takes place on Saturday, August 15, 2015, from 7 to 11 p.m. at Knoxville Zoo.

Feast with the Beasts is an evening event that features everything from appetizers to desserts and a variety of wine, beer and spirits to sample. More than 50 restaurants, wineries, breweries and beverage distributors will be serving their specialties throughout the zoo. A complete list of participating vendors can be found on Knoxville Zoo’s web site at knoxvillezoo.org.

Music on three stages will keep the evening lively. The Vibraslaps will entertain on the main Plaza stage with alternative favorites, while Shiffty and the Headmasters will perform ‘80’s and ‘90’s hits on the Kids Cove stage and Jim Asbell and The Tropiholics will be performing songs for those who are on “island time” on the zoo’s west end.

All food, beverages and entertainment are included with event tickets. Tickets for Feast with the Beasts are $65 per person in advance and $70 the day of the event. Zoo members and ORNL Federal Credit Union members receive a $5 discount. Purchase nine tickets and get the tenth ticket free. Tickets are on sale at Knoxville Zoo’s ticket window during zoo hours. Tickets can also be purchased online at knoxvillezoo.org or by calling (865) 637-5331 and at all Knoxville area ORNL Federal Credit Union locations.

Feast with the Beasts is for guests 21 years of age and over and guests must show a valid photo I.D. to enter the event. All proceeds directly benefit Knoxville Zoo.

For more information, please call 865.637.5331 ext. 300 or visit www.knoxvillezoo.org.


Clarence Brown tickets on sale Aug 9

Individual Tickets for 2015/2016 Clarence Brown Theatre Season go on sale Sunday, August 9, 2015.

“Created right here in Knoxville for our community, the CBT’s 2015/2016 Season promises the absolute best in live theatre,” said David B. Byrd, CBT Managing Director. “From a hilarious send-up of one of motion picture’s greats, to dueling holiday offerings, to a stalwart of the musical theatre canon, there’s something for everyone this season. Don’t wait to purchase tickets and be in control by purchasing online, anytime.”

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The 2015/2016 Clarence Brown Theatre Season includes: “The 39 Steps” by Patrick Barlow; “Of Mice and Men” by John Steinbeck; “Mr. Burns, a Post-Electric Play” by Anne Washburn; “A Christmas Carol” by Charles Dickens; “The Santaland Diaries” by David Sedaris; “Titus Andronicus” by William Shakespeare; “A Lesson Before Dying” by Earnest J. Gaines (The CBT is pleased to be partnering with the Knox County Public Library on “The Big Read,” a series of ancillary events associated with this production and the novel by Ernest J. Gaines); “The Open Hand” – A CBT-Commissioned World Premiere by Rob Caisley; “South Pacific” with music by Richard Rodgers and lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II.

For more information, tickets or accessibility accommodation requests including Open Captioning, ASL, and assistive technologies, please call the CBT Box Office at 865-974-5161 or visit online at clarencebrowntheatre.com/access.


Further East exhibits new works

The Arts & Culture Alliance and the ETSU Slocumb Galleries are pleased to present a new exhibition entitled Further East by the faculty and staff of the Department of Art & Design at East Tennessee State University.

Further East features contemporary work in various media by Johnson City-area artists David Dixon, M. Wayne Dyer, Mira Gerard, Travis Graves, Mindy Herrin, Amanda Hood, Vanessa Mayoraz, Patricia Mink, Catherine Murray, Peter Pawlowicz, Kelly Celeste Porter, Kevin Reaves, Andrew Scott Ross, Katie Sheffield, Ralph Slatton, Mike Smith, and Dawn Marie Tipton and will be displayed at the Emporium Center in downtown Knoxville from August 7-28, 2015.

An opening reception will take place on Friday, August 7, from 5:00-9:00 PM and features a Jazz Jam Session hosted by Vance Thompson and Friends from 7:00-8:45 PM in the Black Box Theatre. Complimentary hors d’oeuvres will be available and chocolate fondue will be provided by the Melting Pot of Knoxville.

The Art Galleries under the Department of Art & Design at the ETSU College of Arts and Sciences promote the understanding and appreciation of visual arts in support of the academic experience and the cultural development surrounding communities. Their mission is to provide venues for and access to contemporary art by organizing innovative exhibitions that promote artistic excellence, diversity, collaborations and creative thinking.

“Further East” will be on display at the Emporium Center, 100 S. Gay Street. Gallery hours are Monday-Friday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM and select Sundays 3:30-6:30 PM.

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Works by Mira Gerard are part of the new exhibit titled Further East at the Department of Art and Design at East TN State University. Photo submitted.


Boomsday at Mabry-Hazen House

KNOXVILLE – Mabry-Hazen House will host its 8th annual Boomsday, Bluegrass, and Barbeque celebration on Sunday, September 6, 2015. On a cool hilltop setting attendees will enjoy a great view of Knoxville’s premiere fireworks show, good food, and live music.

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Tours of the Mabry-Hazen House on Boomsday will begin on September 6, 2015 at 6pm, and dinner will be served at 7:30. Alcohol is BYOB. A new addition this year will be a silent auction offering a variety of fun and exciting items. Photo by John Becker.

Voted one of the best places to watch the Boomsday fireworks show, Mabry-Hazen House also offers food and entertainment without the traffic. Tickets are $60 per adult and children under 12 are free when accompanied by a ticket holder.

Tickets are limited to 200 adults to ensure a quality event. This event has sold out for the past five years. Purchase your tickets in advance to guarantee your attendance. There is plenty of parking and the site offers easy access to I-40 without traffic concerns. Tickets may be purchased in advance by visiting www.mabryhazen.com or call 865-522-8661 for more information.

The event will take place rain or shine. Tickets are non-refundable. Sponsored by WDVX, All Occasions Party Rentals, and Crowne Plaza Knoxville.

Built in 1858, Mabry-Hazen House is strategically located on the highest hill east of downtown Knoxville with spacious views in all directions. The home was occupied and defended by both armies during the Civil War. It housed three generations of the same family for 130 years; the museum showcases one of the largest original family collections in America.


Dinosaurs return to Knoxville

The Knoxville Convention Center once again is inviting families, young people and adults to travel back in time 65 million years at “Discover the Dinosaurs” on Saturday and Sunday, July 18-19, 2015.

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Now in its fourth year at the Convention Center, the interactive exhibition, “Discover the Dinosaurs,” is an educational family outing featuring 40 museum-quality and animatronic dinosaur replicas. In the exhibit’s first three years, more than 43,000 children and adults have attended the attraction. Photo submitted.

“Discover the Dinosaurs,” produced by Blue Star Media, is designed to provide children and adults with a unique and educational way to explore prehistoric life. The exhibit allows visitors to get close and even touch the replicas. The backdrops are custom-designed to reflect the landscapes of the Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous periods.

Several of the dinosaurs are controlled with interactive animatronic buttons that allow children to control the dinosaur’s movements and sounds. The non-moving dinosaurs are able to be touched. The dinosaur replicas are proportionally sized to scale.

The event also features activities, such as Dino Dig, where children pretend to be archeologists hunting for fossils in sand; Dino Den, where young guests climb and interact with dinosaurs their size; Dino Theater, where educational and entertaining videos are shown; coloring station; and scavenger hunt with clues hidden throughout the exhibit.

Tyrannosaurus rex and Triceratops rides, mini-golf and inflatables are available for an additional charge.

The exhibit is open Saturday, July 18, from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., and Sunday, July 19, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.

For tickets, visit http://www.discoverthedinosaurs.com.


Captain America at Knoxville Zoo

Knoxville, Tenn. –Marvel Comics favorites Captain America and Spider-Man are coming to Knoxville Zoo for a special appearance at Superhero Saturday on June 20, 2015 from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m.

Kids ages 12 and under who come dressed as their favorite super hero get free admission with a paid adult admission.

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Superpowers are not required to meet Marvel’s Spider-Man and Captain America at the Knoxville Zoo on June 20, 2015. Fans of all ages are invited to come by for a personal introduction and to pose for photos. Other special activities include the “Superhero Training Academy”, where kids can learn how to use their Hulk-like strength to show some muscle or practice using Superman’s heat vision for heroic rescues.

One free child’s admission offered per adult paid admission, please, and this offer cannot be combined with any other coupon or discount. Valid on Saturday, June 20, 2015 only.

Knoxville Zoo is Knoxville’s largest year-round attraction and is located off exit 392 from Interstate 40.

For more information, please call 865.637.5331 ext. 300.


Celebrate July 4th at Marble Springs

The public is invited as Marble Springs State Historic Site celebrates the Fourth of July 2015. Activities include a “Let Freedom Ring” bell ringing ceremony at 2 p.m., Revolutionary War Stories, and a Raising of a Liberty Pole. This event is in collaboration with the General Henry Knox Chapter Sons of the Revolution and local reenacting community.

This event will take place from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. on July 4 and is free to the public, though donations are appreciated.

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All Fourth of July 2015 activities take place at the Marble Springs State Historic Site: 1220 West Governor John Sevier Highway, in Knoxville. Photo courtesy Marble Springs Historic Site.

Programming assistance for this event is provided by Knox County. Marble Springs is funded under an agreement with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Tennessee Historical Commission, and supplemented by additional funds raised by the Governor John Sevier Memorial Association.

Information found at 865-573-5508.

 


Alive After Five summer series begins

KNOXVILLE, TN—The Knoxville Museum of Art announces the summer series of Alive After Five, premiering with Kukuly & The Gypsy Fuego on Friday, June 19, 2015 from 6:00 to 8:30 pm.

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The summer series of 2015 premiers with the Alive After Five debut of Kukuly & The Gypsy Fuego (Spanish for “Fire”). Photo submitted.

A native of Peru, Kukuly Uriarte has been a member of the Knoxville music community for several years, and her band, The Gypsy Fuego, keeps growing in popularity as they perform in venues all around the Knoxville and Maryville area. Their music “knows no borders,” as it encompasses an international mix of Gypsy jazz, American swing “with a French accent,” and also Latin standards like Argentine tangos and Brazilian bossa novas. For this occasion, the “deluxe” 7-member Gypsy Fuego will perform.

Alive After Five is a unique live music series presented on twenty-eight Fridays per year in four seasonal series. The programs take place in the smoke-free, casually elegant setting of the Ann and Steve Bailey Hall in the Knoxville Museum of Art.

There is a live band on stage, seating at tables, two cash bars, food from area restaurants, free freshly popped popcorn, free parking, and a licensed therapeutic masseuse available. Audience members can enjoy listening to music, dancing, and browsing the museum’s art galleries.

Admission to the summer series premier of Alive After Five is $10 for general admission and $5 for museum members and college students with ID. Ages 17 and under are admitted free.

For more information about the Alive After Five series, please contact Michael Gill, Alive After Five Coordinator, at (865) 934-2039.


See Park fireflies this weekend

GSMNP – Great Smoky Mountains National Park’s firefly viewing event in Elkmont takes place through Tuesday, June 9, 2015.

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Every year in late May or early June, thousands of visitors gather near the popular Elkmont Campground to observe the naturally occurring phenomenon of Photinus carolinus, a firefly species that flashes synchronously.

Access to the viewing area during the 8-days of predicted peak activity is provided through a shuttle service beginning at Sugarlands Visitor Center. All visitors wishing to view the synchronous fireflies at Elkmont must have a parking pass ($1.50 for regular sized vehicles) and an additional $1 (cash) for the shuttle round-trip. Parking passes are non-refundable, non-transferable, and good only for the date issued. Visitors are not allowed to walk the Elkmont entrance road due to safety concerns.

Passes can be purchased at http://www.recreation.gov. Parking passes may also be obtained by calling 1-877-444-6777, but park officials strongly encourage the use of the online process because it provides more information to visitors about what to expect when they arrive at the park.

For more information about the synchronous fireflies, please visit the park website at http://www.nps.gov/grsm/learn/nature/fireflies.htm.


Pineyro leads TN Smokies to win

KODAK – Tennessee starting pitcher Ivan Pineyro continued his hot stretch, tossing his third quality start in a span of four outings by blanking Jackson over seven frames, while shortstop Elliot Soto tallied three hits and added a walk to lead the Smokies to a 3-0 shutout win over the Generals on Tuesday evening at Smokies Stadium.

The victory improved Tennessee’s overall mark in 2015 to 22-17 and keeps the club within two games of the Chattanooga Lookouts for first place in the Southern League’s North Division. The defeat for Jackson, meanwhile, dropped the Generals’ season clip to 16-21.

The closest the Generals got to scoring came in the fifth, putting two runners on base with nobody out, but Pineyro was up to the task to keep Jackson off the board. CF Gabriel Guerrero singled to right, while 1B Dan Paolini reached base on a bunt infield single to start the threat. After Guerrero was forced out on a bunt attempt, Pineyro was able to induce a 6-4-3 twin killing to end the frame and escape the jam to preserve his scoreless outing.

Tickets may be purchased by calling the Smokies Ticket Office at (865) 286-2300.

ABOUT THE TENNESSEE SMOKIES

The Tennessee Smokies are the Double-A affiliate of the Chicago Cubs. Members of the ten-team Southern League, Smokies baseball has been entertaining families and fans of America’s national pastime in the East Tennessee region for over 100 years. To learn more about the Tennessee Smokies, visit www.smokiesbaseball.com.

 


Summer movies at TN Theatre

KNOXVILLE (May 19, 2015) The Tennessee Theatre in downtown Knoxville is hosting the 17th Annual Summer Movie Magic lineup this summer. Movie-goers will travel back in time and see these American classics as they should be: on a big screen, with a live audience, in a beautiful and historical theater, with a bag of popcorn and a cold drink.

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This year is the first season all summer films will be shown with a digital projector at the Tennessee Theatre. Patrons will experience favorite classics in a beautiful and historic setting. Summer Movie Magic is sponsored by Denark Construction. Photo by Celebrate Knoxville.

RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK
Friday, June 19 · 8 PM
Sunday, June 21 · 2 PM

THE BIRDS
Friday, June 26 · 8 PM
Sunday, June 28 · 2 PM

MARY POPPINS
Friday, July 24 · 8 PM
Sunday, July 26 · 2 PM

GONE WITH THE WIND
Friday, July 31 · 7 PM
Saturday, August 1 · 7 PM
Sunday, August 2 · 2 PM

ROMAN HOLIDAY
Friday, August 14 · 8 PM
Sunday, August 16 · 2 PM

THE BIG LEBOWSKI
Friday, August 21 · 8 PM
Sunday, August 23 · 2 PM
Tickets are $9.00 adult, $7.00 children under 12 and seniors 65 and over.

The complete 2015 Summer Movie Magic Series presented by Denark Construction.


Knoxville Zoo highlights endangered

Knoxville – For the 10th Anniversary of Endangered Species Day, and to highlight the growing importance of working on saving endangered species from extinction, Knoxville Zoo’s African penguins “vanished” from their habitat for one day last week.

“Today, we are asking our visitors to pause and consider what extinction looks and feels like,” said Lisa New, executive director of Knoxville Zoo. “This is a collaborative effort with other zoos and aquariums to motivate and inspire people to join in our efforts to save animals from extinction. One of the easiest ways to help is by visiting Knoxville Zoo, which directly supports the work we’re doing with other zoos as well as scientists in the field to save animals for future generations.”

The vanishing animals at Knoxville Zoo are part of a larger, national effort organized by the Association of Zoos & Aquariums (AZA), of which Knoxville Zoo is a member. The 229-accredited members of the AZA are coming together to help the public consider what it would be like to not be able to see, learn from or connect with endangered animals if they were extinct.

Endangered Species Day was chosen by the AZA to launch a new collaborative initiative, Saving Animals From Extinction (SAFE). Through SAFE, AZA-accredited zoos and aquariums will convene scientists and stakeholders globally to identify the factors threatening species, develop Conservation Action Plans, collect new resources and engage the public.

In 2015, SAFE will focus on 10 species and then add an additional 10 species each year for the next 10 years. The inaugural 10 species include: African penguin, Asian elephants, Black rhinoceros, cheetah, gorilla, sea turtles, vaquita, sharks and rays, Western pond turtle and Whooping Crane.


Knoxville Zoo hosts sports event

Knoxville Zoo’s Wild World of Sports event will take place Saturday, May 16, 2015 from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. at Knoxville Zoo.

Bamboo Playing Soccer

Athletic-themed activities include the chance for kids to interact with local collegiate athletes playing games that challenge them to move like animals.

Professional players and mascots from the Tennessee Smokies baseball team will be posing for photos and signing autographs, and guests can interact with other organizations representing the sports scene in Knoxville, including the Knoxville Force soccer team, the Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame and Knoxville Bubbleball, a member of the National Association of Bubble Soccer.

All Wild World of Sports event activities are included as part of general admission to Knoxville Zoo. Knoxville Zoo is Knoxville’s most-visited destination. Knoxville Zoo is nationally accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) and is committed to the highest standards in animal care and well-being, ethics, conservation, and education.

Currently, the zoo is open Monday through Friday from 9:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 9:30 a.m. until 6:00 p.m.

Admission and ticket sales stop one-hour before the zoo closes. Next-day admission is free after 3 p.m. For more information, please call 865.637.5331.


Great views from hiking House Mtn

By Laura Long/CelebrateKnoxville.com. If you’re looking for a great place to enjoy Springtime in East Tennessee, you’ll want to hike House Mountain, a 500-acre natural area located in Knox County approximately eight miles from Knoxville.

The hiking trails are short, but steep, challenging, and rewarding. The 2,100-foot crest of House Mountain provides great views of the Unakas and Cumberlands some 30 miles away, or northeast to the adjacent Clinch Mountain.

According to Knox County’s Department of Parks and Recreation, before erosion by Big Flat Creek, “the gently dipping bedrock layers underlying House Mountain once extended to Clinch Mountain, whose base lies approximately two and half miles to the northeast. The bedrock structure represents a large synclinal fold that formed during the Appalachian mountain building event called the Alleghenian Orogeny.”

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The western trail of House Mountain to the crest is .8 miles and the eastern trail is 1.5 miles. The western trail is narrow, steep, and has a few turns that require careful negotiating. Both trails are connected at the top by the wider Crest Trail that is 1.5 miles long. Photo by Laura Long/Celebrate Knoxville.

Many hikers bring their dogs with them on the trail. From time to time, a courteous wait is needed to allow hikers coming down and hikers going up enough room to pass one another.

In a few places, the great sandstone boulders serve as resting places or picnic spots for hikers or artists sketching the chestnut oaks and mountain pines. Photographers are often seen kneeling in the moist dirt by streambeds to catch a close-up. The north-facing slopes support a forest of sugar maple, tulip poplar, ash, and buckeye.

Don’t forget the binoculars: House Mountain is also a favorite place for birdwatchers. Migrating hawks and warblers can be observed from the mountain. Ruffed grouse, pileated woodpeckers, scarlet tanagers, wild turkeys, and more than one hundred additional species of birds have been observed on the mountain.

Gurgling from the cool streams provide a musical backdrop for hikers making their way up the slopes. House Mountain is drained by several unnamed tributaries of Roseberry Creek and by Hogskin and Brice Branches, which divide it from the 1,500 feet high McAnnally Ridge, which lies to the east and south.

To get to House Mountain from Knoxville, Tennessee, take I-40 East. Exit on U.S. Highway 11W (Rutledge Pike) and go north and east on Rutledge Pike. After about 10 miles, look for the “House Mountain State Park” sign on the right side of the highway and then turn left on Idumea Road. Turn left on Hogskin Road. The parking area is less than a mile on the right. Restrooms are available next to the parking lot. There is no admission fee to hike the trails.

Benches and signage along the trails are provided in memory of John Evans, a Scout leader and founding member/active volunteer for Friends of House Mountain. Enjoy the trails and remember to Leave No Trace.

–Laura Long/CelebrateKnoxville.com


A Prairie Home Companion at TN Theatre

The Tennessee Theatre presents Garrison Keillor’s A Prairie Home Companion with Rick Dworsky, Fred Newman, and Sarah Jarosz on Thursday, August 13, 2015. Doors open at 7pm, show starts at 8pm.

At the Janet Wallace Auditorium at Macalester College in Saint Paul in 1974, if you plunked down your $1 admission (50 cents for kids) to attend the very first broadcast of A Prairie Home Companion, you were in select company. There were about 12 people in the audience. But those in attendance thought there were worse ways to spend a Saturday afternoon, so Garrison Keillor and the APHC team went on to produce close to 500 live shows in the first 10 years alone. There were broadcasts from this venue and that, until March 4, 1978, when the show moved to The World Theater, a lovely, crumbling building that was one plaster crack away from the wrecking ball. (Now fully renovated and renamed The Fitzgerald, it is the show’s home base.)

In June of 1987, APHC ended for a while. Garrison thought it was a good idea at the time, but only two years later, the show was back, based in New York and called American Radio Company of the Air. But there’s no place like home. So in 1992, it was back to Minnesota and, soon after, back to the old name: A Prairie Home Companion.
Today, A Prairie Home Companion is heard by 4 million listeners each week on more than 600 public radio stations, and abroad on America One and the American Forces Networks in Europe and the Far East. Garrison recalls, “When the show started, it was something funny to do with my friends, and then it became an achievement that I hoped would be successful, and now it’s a good way of life.”

Tickets are $86.50 and $64.50 plus applicable service fees.


Spring arrives at IJAMS

Spring arrives officially today and Knoxville’s urban wilderness, IJAMS, invites residents to enjoy the warmer weather by exploring the nature center on Saturday, March 21, 2015. Just some of the weekend scheduled events are:

9 am – 10 am
PUBLIC PROGRAM: Wagging Walk
(All Ages) Grab your favorite four-legged friend and join Ijams’ own veterinarian, Dr. Louise Conrad, as she walks her own canine companions. She’ll review good doggy etiquette at the park and help owners understand the special safety concerns for dogs in nature. The fee for this program is $5 for non-members and FREE for members. Please call (865) 577-4717, ext. 110 to register.

9 am – 12 pm
IJAMS BIRDING SERIES: Backyard Birding Basics
(Recommended for Adults) Studying birds can open up a new world of outdoor exploration. This hands-on workshop will take you into the field to learn more about the practice of birding as well as how to identify common bird species. Instructor: Stephen Lyn Bales. Fee: $29. This is an UT Non-credit course.

9:30 am – 11 am
PEG’S KITCHEN: Breakfast is Served
If you are heading to Ijams this Saturday morning for a program, hike or simple walkabout, bring your appetite. Each week, Peg’s Kitchen features one of Ijams’ very own chefs, including the original… Peg! The menu varies from biscuits and gravy with sausage to pancakes and maple syrup, plus fresh fruit, coffee or tea. Come hungry! The fee for breakfast is $7 for adults and $5 for children (12 and under). For $10, you can get all you can eat! No pre-registration is required.

10 am, 2 pm, 3 pm
ANIMAL PROGRAM: Ijams Creature Feature
(All Ages) Have you met all the animals that call the Ijams Visitor Center home? If not, be sure to stop by every Saturday for a chance to get nose-to-beak with some of our resident furred and feathered ambassadors. This program is FREE, but donations to support animal care are welcome. Pre-registration is not required for this event.

1 pm – 4 pm
TN NATURALIST PROGRAM: Introduction
(Ages 16 and up) The Tennessee Naturalist Program (TNP) is an education training course designed to introduce the natural history of Tennessee to interested adults. This immersive nature study allows participants the chance to wade in creeks, stargaze in an open field, and even catch bugs and tadpoles. How often do you get the chance to act like a kid again? This week is the introductory session for the 2015 class. Open to registered participants only. For more information, call Peg at (865) 577-4717, ext. 114.

6 pm
IJAMS BIRDING SERIES: Woodcock Supper Walk
(All Ages) Join senior naturalist Stephen Lyn Bales as he reveals his secret location for observing the whimsical mating display of male woodcocks. Filled with struts, peents, flutters, and tweets, it is one of the most unique performances in the birding world. Peg’s kitchen will also be serving a traditional soupy supper to warm our bellies before we go adventuring. The fee for this program is $10 for Ijams members and $15 for non-members. Please call (865) 577-4717, ext. 110 to register.


Alive After Five 2015 announces shows

KNOXVILLE, TN—The Knoxville Museum of Art announces the spring series of Alive After Five, premiering with Kelle Jolly & The Will Boyd Project on Friday, March 20, from 6-8:30 pm. This year’s spring series features six shows, concluding on May 8, 2015.

01 Kelle Jolly & The Will Boyd Project 3 20 15

The KMA Alive After Five 2015 spring series premiers with a performance of jazzy R & B by some of the most talented musicians in Knoxville. Kelle Jolly & The Will Boyd Project bring classic standards to life with their soulful stylings and bluesy grooves. Photo courtesy Michael Gill.

Combining a voice reminiscent of Sarah Vaughn and Oleta Adams with an effervescent stage presence, Kelle Jolly is the perfect counterpoint to her husband Will’s cool virtuosity on any of the saxophones he chooses to play. Kelle is the host of “Jazz Jam” on WUOT 91.9FM and the co-host with Robert Minter of “What’s Goin’ On” on Community TV. Besides his own Project, Will stays busy playing regularly with the Knoxville Jazz Orchestra, The Streamliners Swing Orchestra, and The BluePrint.

Alive After Five is a unique live music series presented on twenty-eight Fridays per year in four seasonal series. The programs take place in the smoke-free, casually elegant setting of the Ann and Steve Bailey Hall in the Knoxville Museum of Art. There is a live band on stage, seating at tables, two cash bars, food from area restaurants, free freshly popped popcorn, free parking, and a licensed therapeutic masseuse available. Audience members can enjoy listening to music, dancing, and browsing the museum’s art galleries.

Admission to the Spring series premier of Alive After Five is $10 for general admission and $5 for museum members and college students with ID. Ages 17 and under are admitted free. Alive After Five is sponsored by Cherokee Distributing Company, Knoxville Mercury, and WDVX-89.9FM. For more information about the Alive After Five series, please contact Michael Gill, Alive After Five Coordinator, at (865) 934-2039.

The 2015 Spring Series Schedule for “Alive After Five”:

(all shows 6:00-8:30 pm)

March 20 – Kelle Jolly & The Will Boyd Project ($10, $5)

April 10 – The Streamliners Swing Orchestra ($15, $10)

April 17 – Leftfoot Dave & The Magic Hats ($10, $5)

April 24 – SoulfulSounds Revue ($10, $5)

May 1 – Robinella ($10, $5)

May 8 – TABOO ($10, $5)


Park Day at Mabry-Hazen

Knoxville – On Saturday, March 28, 2015, history buffs, community leaders and preservationists will team up with the Civil War Trust, History and Take Pride in America at more than 98 historic sites across the country to participate in the 18th annual Park Day.

Since its inception in 1996, Park Day has attracted volunteers of all ages and abilities bound by their dedication to serving their communities. In 2014, nearly 9,000 volunteers at 104 sites across the country donated more than 35,000 service hours. This year, organizers hope to build on these impressive figures.

Mabry-Hazen House will participate in Park Day on Saturday, March 28, 2015, from 9am to 2pm. Activities will include leaf and brush removal, mulching, and general spring-cleaning. Some tools will be provided, but volunteers are encouraged to bring rakes, pitchforks, tarps, and similar yard tools.

mabry_hazen

Mabry-Hazen House, listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Photo courtesy Calvin Chappelle.

Additional information about the event can be obtained by calling 865-522-8661.

 


IJAMS hosts Bird Nesting program

KNOXVILLE – Ready to get out and do something fun this weekend? Join IJAMS Nature Center senior naturalist Stephen Lyn Bales Saturday, March 7, 2015, from 9-11 a.m. for an indoor program on “Bird Nesting.”

Bluebirds need pine needles, titmice need hair, wrens need a hidey-hole and robins just need a flat surface and mud. Learn quick tips on how you can help your backyard birds nest successfully. After the program, enjoy hiking around the IJAMS Nature Center.

The fee for the Bird Nesting program is $7 for Ijams members and $12 for non-members.

IJAMS’ chef Peg will also be serving a traditional breakfast.

Please call (865) 577-4717, ext. 110 to register.

IJAMS Nature Center is a 300-acre urban greenspace and environmental learning center in downtown Knoxville.


McClung Museum receives rare maps

KNOXVILLE—Almost 200 rare maps of Europe and other parts of the world created between the 1500s and 1800s now belong to the UT McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture.

Twenty of the maps are currently on display in the Burchfiel Geography Building. These, and the other maps housed in the museum’s collections, will be used for exhibition and teaching at the museum. They also will be used for undergraduate and graduate coursework on the history of maps and mapmaking from the sixteenth century onward and the importance of such maps to navigation, world politics, business and trade, agriculture, exploration, colonialism, and warfare.

“This collection of maps is a meaningful addition to our resources available for teaching, and several UT faculty have already taken advantage of the availability of the maps as a tool for inspiring meaningful discussions in their classrooms about cultural identity, political boundaries, and change, as well as socioeconomic conditions,” said Lindsey Waugh, the McClung Museum’s coordinator of academic programs.

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Students in Jovana Babovic’s Central European Cities class discuss political power, cultural perception, and urban development as they view seventeenth and eighteenth-century maps in the McClung Museum’s object study room. Photo submitted.

Most of the 191 maps are copperplate engravings with painstakingly applied hand color. They were created by mapmaking giants of the sixteenth to eighteenth centuries, including Gerard Mercator, the famous cartographer who was the first to plot the straight-line courses (Mercator projection) typical on today’s maps; Abraham Ortelius, the creator of the first modern atlas; Nicholas Visscher, whose family made some of the most famous maps during the golden age of Dutch mapmaking; and Guillaume DeLisle, popular for his maps of newly explored Africa and the Americas.

The gift came to the museum from Jeffery M. Leving, attorney and founder of Fathers’ Rights in Chicago. Two additional maps were gifted by Orrin Lippoff of Brooklyn, New York, and Robert J. Isakson of Mobile, Alabama. The museum worked closely with W. Graham Arader III, owner of Arader Galleries and a longtime UT donor, who facilitated these gifts.


Scott Miller headlines Bijou event

Scott Miller and The Commonwealth will perform on the U.S. Cellular Stage at the Bijou Theatre for the 2015 Bijou Jubilee.

Presented by Pilot/Flying J and supported by Ole Smoky Moonshine, the annual fundraiser takes place Saturday, March 14, 2015, at 8:30 p.m. Tickets go on sale Friday, January 30 at 10 a.m. through Ticketmaster.

scottmiller

The Bijou is hosting an exclusive VIP Pre-Show Party again this year. With the $100 VIP ticket, guests will enjoy an exclusive acoustic performance by Scott Miller and Mic Harrison plus food and drink from Holly’s Eventful Dining, Ole Smoky Moonshine, Ashe’s Wine & Spirits, and Bearden Beer Market.

An auction featuring artist-signed instruments and framed posters will also be held during the event.

Proceeds from the event will help preserve Knoxville’s historic Bijou Theatre, located at 803 South Gay Street in downtown Knoxville.


Handmade exhibit at Emporium

The Arts & Culture Alliance proudly presents the 2nd Annual “HandMade Here: A Tennessee Craft Chapter Exhibition,” featuring original works of basketry, clay, fiber, glass, wood, metals, leather, handmade paper, mixed media, fiber, printmaking, photography.

Frank Martin, Professor at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville School of Art, will jury the exhibition.

Works will be displayed in the main gallery of the Emporium Center from February 6-28, 2015. Most of the works will be for sale.

A public reception will take place on Friday, February 6, from 5:00-9:00 PM. The First Friday reception also features music by Cricket & Snail in the gallery; a flamenco dance performance by Pasión Flamenco from 6:00-6:30 PM in the Black Box Theatre; and a Jazz Jam Session hosted by Vance Thompson and Friends from 7:00-9:00 PM in the Black Box Theatre. Complimentary hors d’oeuvres will be available and chocolate fondue will be provided by the Melting Pot of Knoxville.
HandMade_Here2


Knoxville train bell is returned

Knoxville’s Three Rivers Rambler held a special ceremony recently to celebrate the return of No. 154’s stolen bell.

No. 154 is an 1890 steam engine that ran freight operations in Knoxville in the early 1900s. The engine was stored in a Knoxville park for fifty years before being restored by the Three Rivers Rambler train ride. The coal-fired steam engine- believed to be one of the oldest operating steam engines in the United States- has been in service on the Three Rivers Rambler for about four years.

ThreeRiversRambler

Last summer 154’s bell was stolen from the engine. Two members of the Knoxville community- Bo Shafer, owner of a local insurance company, and Finbarr Saunders, a city councilman- each stepped forward to donate a replacement bell to the 3RR. Bo Shafer’s bell is now in operation on steam engine No. 203. Finbarr Saunder’s bell will be permanently displayed in the new 3RR depot.

Due to the efforts of the Knox County Sheriff’s department, 154’s bell was recently recovered and returned today to its proper place. A replica of 154 was given to Sheriff Jimmy “J.J.” Jones.


Celebrate Christmas in the City

It’s Christmas in the City; there’s so much to see and enjoy in downtown Knoxville this holiday season, from making a holiday wreath at Ramsey House or visiting the Holidays on Ice skating rink in Market Square.

IceSkatingKnoxville

The Holidays on Ice skating rink is open daily through January 4, 2015 in downtown Knoxville’s Market Square. Admission is $10 for adults and $7 for children (season passes are also available). Admission includes skate rental and unlimited time on the ice. Photo by CelebrateKnoxville.com.

On December 13 and 20, the Market Square Farmers Market hosts the Holiday Market throughout Market Square and Market Street. Vendors will have booths set up with handmade gifts, holiday decor, food and more. This is a great place to find unique gifts for everyone on your shopping list.

Parking is free in Knoxville’s Market Square (406 Walnut Street) State Street and Locust Street garages all day on weekends.

Dec. 13
Wreath Making Workshop at the Historic Ramsey House, 2614 Thorngrove Pike.
Join your friends for this great tradition of fun and creativity and go home with a beautiful natural green wreath. We supply the Holiday treats, materials and the expert instruction of Julia Shiflett and her Christmas helpers. Make your reservation in advance and bring handheld garden pruners and gloves. The social is 12:30 p.m. with the class starting promptly at 1 p.m. Sign up with a buddy or start a family tradition. Reserve your spot by calling 865-546-0745.

Dec. 14
“It’s a Wonderful Life”
Celebrate the Christmas season in the grandeur of the Tennessee Theatre, Gay Street, as Home Federal Bank presents classic film, “It’s a Wonderful Life.” Admission is free; no ticket is required. Seating is limited to the theater’s capacity. Doors open one hour prior to each screening.

Dec. 13 – 15
The Nativity Pageant of Knoxville
The pageant combines a cast of 90 members, live animals, realistic sets and authentic costumes to create a powerful presentation of the miraculous birth of Jesus Christ and the meaning of Christmas. The story is told in beautiful music and narration. The pageant is free and is interpreted for the deaf and hearing-impaired. Saturday, December 13 at 3 pm, Sunday, December 14 at 3 pm, Monday, December 15 at 7 pm, at the Knoxville Civic Coliseum. Free Admission.


Candlelight tours at Ramsey House

Knoxville’s historic Ramsey House will be offering Candlelight Tours on Sunday, December 14, 2014. This event will provide a rare opportunity to tour the 1797 historic home by candlelight while it is adorned in natural holiday decor.

Candlelight tours are between 6:00 – 8:00 p.m. Admission is free, however donations are accepted. Seasonal music, hot cider, and Christmas treats will be served.

RamseyHouse

Ramsey House Plantation, located off Gov. John Sevier Highway at 2614 Thorn Grove Pike, is the 1797 home of Col. Frances Alexander Ramsey, an important figure in the early settlement of Tennessee who, along with family members, was instrumental in the development of Knoxville from a small frontier village to a bustling city.

For additional information, contact Ramsey House at 865-546-0745.


Mabry Hazen hosts holiday tours

Knoxville’s Mabry-Hazen House invites the public to enjoy history and the holidays with a tour through the historic site. Rooms and other areas will be decorated by well known Knoxville decorators as well as volunteers and museum staff.

Christmas

The event is free of charge and light refreshments will be served. Christmas Tours are scheduled for Saturday, December 13, 2014 from 5-8pm and Sunday, December 14, from 2-5pm.

Built in 1858, The Mabry-Hazen House is strategically located on the highest hill east of downtown Knoxville with spacious views in all directions. The home was occupied and defended by both armies during the Civil War. It housed three generations of the same family for 130 years; the museum showcases one of the largest original family collections in America.

Attendance and donations will help support the museum’s mission to preserve and educate the public about an important part of East Tennessee history.

For more information, call 865-522-8661.


Knox Heritage holds preservation awards

KNOXVILLE, TENN. – Knox Heritage holds its 2014 Preservation Awards ceremony and Annual Meeting on Thursday, November 20, 2014 at the Bijou Theatre in downtown Knoxville. The special guest of the evening is Knoxville’s Mayor, Madeline Rogero. Admission is free, and everyone is welcome to attend.

The event begins at 5:00 p.m. with a reception, followed by the Annual Meeting and Preservation Awards at 6:00 p.m. A report of the organization’s work from the previous year will be delivered by Knox Heritage board president Annette Brun. Mayor Rogero will deliver remarks before the Preservation Awards are presented.

Awards for the best in preservation during 2014 will be presented in the following categories: the City of Knoxville Mayor’s Award and the Knox County Mayor’s Award; the Greystone Award; the “Fantastic Fifteen” for preservation rehabilitation, restoration, compatible infill and preservation stewardship; the Volunteer of the Year; and the Media Award.


Blount Mansion hosts holiday tours

Blount Mansion will host a colonial Christmas celebration and Open House on Friday, December 5, 2014, with candlelight tours of the mansion at 6 p.m. and 7 p.m.

Enjoy Christmas traditions from the colonial period while enjoying demonstrations of what Christmas was like on the Tennessee frontier. Guests artists and crafts people will particularly enjoy a demonstration of colonial yarn spinning techniques while enjoying some snacks and warm drinks.

BlountMansionKnoxvilleTN

The Blount Mansion, also known as William Blount Mansion, is located at 200 West Hill Avenue in downtown Knoxville, Tennessee, and was the home of the only territorial governor of the Southwest Territory, William Blount (1749–1800). Blount, also a signer of the United States Constitution and a U.S. Senator from Tennessee, lived on the property with his family and the mansion served as the headquarters of the Southwest Territory. In 1796, much of the Tennessee Constitution was drafted at the mansion.

Tennessee state historian John Trotwood Moore once called Blount Mansion “the most important historical spot in Tennessee.”

Suggested donation for the Open House, which will be used to help preserve the mansion, is $5.

For more information call (865) 525-2375.


Foothills craft show Nov 14-16

The Foothills Craft Guild Annual Show takes place November 14-16, 2014, at the Jacob Building at Chilhowee Park in Knoxville, Tennessee. The Foothills Craft Guild is a non-profit organization of over 280 craft artists in Tennessee dedicated to preserving and promoting craft traditions.

Hours for the show are Fri. & Sat. 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.; and Sunday 11 a.m. – 5 p.m.

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The Foothills Craft Guild annual show is a favorite for local Christmas shoppers, showcasing the finest in handmade Tennessee crafts including painting, fiber, clay, jewelry, and wood crafts. Demonstrations for glass blowing and glass bead making will take place throughout the weekend. Photo: exotic woodwork by Bob Klassen.

Admission is Adults $8, Seniors $7, and children under 13 Free.

Chilhowee Park is located at 3301 East Magnolia Avenue, next to the Knoxville Zoo.

Download a coupon (limit one coupon per person) for one dollar off admission HERE.


Classic movie celebrates Christmas

In celebration of the Christmas season, East Tennessee neighbors are invited to enjoy two free screenings of “It’s a Wonderful Life” at the historic Tennessee Theatre on Sunday, Dec. 14, 2014.

The film will be shown at 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. and no ticket is required. Seating is limited to the theater’s capacity.

As a bonus, moviegoers will have the opportunity to pick up $2 discount coupons for the City of Knoxville’s Holidays on Ice open-air skating rink on Market Square.

Released in 1947 and starring Jimmy Stewart and Donna Reed, “It’s a Wonderful Life” is was nominated for five Academy Awards and ranks No. 20 on the American Film Institute’s “100 Greatest Movies of All Time” list.

The Tennessee Theatre is located at 604 S. Gay Street in downtown Knoxville. Free parking is available in the State Street garage. Patrons with special needs should contact the Tennessee Theatre in advance at 865-684-1200.

The movie screening is sponsored by Home Federal Bank.

 


Shop early for holidays at IJAMS

KNOXVILLE – Ijams Nature Center is hosting a rummage sale this Saturday, November 8, 2014, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Items include housewares, dishes, furniture, children’s clothing and toys, and shoppers are encouraged to visit early to get the best selection, or visit late to get the best bargains.

All proceeds support education programs at Ijams Nature Center.

Ijams is a wild place filled with rocks, rivers, trees, trails, owls and salamanders. Visitors of all ages and ability can hike, bike, paddle, stroll, learn or simply enjoy the day. Ijams is a sanctuary for all visitors to learn and connect with the natural world and be made better by that connection – a place where living with the earth and caring for the earth become one and the same. Ijams is a member and visitor-supported nonprofit organization.

Ijams Nature Center is located at 2915 Island Home Avenue.


Knoxville hosts Fanboy Expo

The region’s premier pop culture meet-and-greet and collectibles event, Fanboy Expo, comes to the Knoxville Convention Center, Nov. 7-9, 2014.

Cult classic lovers and comic book aficionados will travel to Knoxville for the chance to meet their favorite celebrity actors and comic illustrators. The expo also will feature vendors selling comic books, toys and other fandom paraphernalia.

Celebrities will be available throughout the weekend to answer questions from fans, pose for pictures and sign photos and memorabilia. Some of the notable guests will include:

• John Rhys-Davies, best known as Gimli the dwarf in the Lord of the Rings trilogy.

• Henry Winkler, who played Arthur “Fonzie” Fonzarelli in the 1970s sitcom, “Happy Days”

• Peter Mayhew, the actor behind Chewbacca in the “Star Wars” series

• William Zabka, best known as villain Johnny Lawrence in “The Karate Kid”

• Tommy Flanagan, Emilio Rivera, Rusty Coones, Michael Ornstein, Kristen Renton and

Natalie Skyy known for their roles on the hit FX series, “Sons of Anarchy”

• George Newbern, the voice of Superman in the animated Justice League series

• Sarah Douglas, best known as Ursa opposite Christopher Reeve in “Superman” and

“Superman II”

• Shannon Farnon, who voiced Wonder Woman in “Super Friends”

• Dee Wallace, best known as Elliott’s mom in “E.T.: The Extraterrestrial”

• Sandahl Bergman, known for her role as Valeria in “Conan the Barbarian” with Arnold

Schwarzenegger.

• Rodger Bumpass, the voice of Squidward in “SpongeBob SquarePants”

• Several cast members from AMC’s “The Walking Dead”

• Julius LeFlore, stuntman for “Return of the Jedi”

• Wrestling legends Jim Duggan, known as “Hacksaw Jim Duggan,” and Chris Chavis, “known

as “Tatanka”

The exhibition booths with comic books, movie props and other fandom paraphernalia will be open from 4 to 9 p.m. Friday; 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday; and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. General admission tickets are available for purchase at the door, $15-$25 single day and $50 weekend.


Knoxville Blue Slip Winery relocates

Knoxville City and Knox County officials and dignitaries were in attendance at yesterday’s grand opening of the Blue Slip Winery at the historic Southern Railway Station (built in 1903) in downtown Knoxville.

Blue Slip Winery owners Linn Slocum, Jeff Galyon, and Marvin House called the new location for the business “a treasure” and thanked family, friends, business leaders, and a host of others (including local grape growers!) for helping to make their dream a reality. Beginning in 2009, the business was formerly located on Jackson Avenue in the Old City and is Knoxville’s first urban winery.

The new location in the Southern Railway Station provides not only more space for the on-site production of handcrafted wines made from local grapes, it also provides a place where customers can rent space for special events including wedding receptions.

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Celebrating the grand opening of the Blue Slip Winery in the Southern Railway Station are from left: Blue Slip Winery owners Jeff Galyon and Linn Slocum, Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero, and Blue Slip Winery partner Marvin House, CEO of Knoxville-based Merit Construction. Photo by Laura Long Martin, CelebrateKnoxville.com.

Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero praised the location for the new business, saying that the area was “walkable and bikeable,” and featured not only ample parking but also a bus stop right out front.

“This is about being downtown in the heart of the city,” Mayor Rogero told the crowd at the event’s official ribbon cutting. “This is about shopping local.”

Knox County Mayor Tim Burchett also expressed the county’s approval of the site, calling it “Napa Valley Tennessee,” and joked that although he did not drink alcohol, he was a certainly a big fan of economic development.

Jim and Betty Tolliver, owners of the Old Smokey Railway Museum, attended the event and said they were “thrilled with how the building has been restored.”

Jim Tolliver pointed out historic items in the building’s showcase shelves and noted that the Southern Railway Station’s former ticket window was still a great feature, along with restored benches and ornamental fireplaces.

–Laura Long Martin, CelebrateKnoxville.com, November 4, 2014.

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Jim and Betty Tolliver, owners of the Old Smokey Railway Museum, stand next to former ticket window in the restored Southern Railway Station in downtown Knoxville. The building is now the new location for Knoxville’s first urban winery, Blue Slip Winery. Below, the view of the Southern Railway Station from the Gay Street Bridge. The Blue Slip Winery building is on the right. Photo by Laura Long Martin, CelebrateKnoxville.com.

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Emporium hosts juried exhibit

KNOXVILLE – The receipt deadline for the Arts and Culture Alliance juried show is midnight on Sunday, December 7, 2014. Prizes include at least $1,000 in cash awards and a catalog for exhibiting artists.

Approximately 40-50 fine art works encompassing all styles and genres will be exhibited in the Balcony gallery of the beautifully-restored Emporium Center at 100 S. Gay Street, Knoxville’s downtown arts anchor location, from February 6-28, 2015.

Stefanie Gerber Darr, manager of the galleries and permanent collection at Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts, will jury the exhibition.

Entries must be original works completed within the last two years in the following categories: 2-D (painting, drawing, mixed media, printmaking, photography) and 3-D (sculpture of all media). The maximum allowed size is 120″ x 120″ in any direction including frame or stand.

The nonrefundable entry fee is $40 for up to three works ($25 for Arts & Culture Alliance members and students). Up to three additional entries may be submitted for $7/each ($5 for members/students).

For more information, please contact Suzanne Cada: sc@knoxalliance.com or (865) 523-7543.


Historic TN Theatre offers tours

The Tennessee Theatre invites guests to a Fall Festival Open House during First Friday from 6-8 p.m. on Nov. 7, 2014 with fall-themed activities, snacks and free history tours of the iconic venue.

TNTheatre

Located in the heart of downtown Knoxville, the Tennessee Theatre opened in 1928 as a movie palace. The Tennessee Theatre is the Official State Theatre of Tennessee and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Photo by CelebrateKnoxville.com.

The fall festival will include a caricature artist who will draw free portraits of attendees and the iconic theater marquee; apple cider and fall treats; music on the Mighty Wurlitzer organ; and free backstage tours led by theater historians.

The tours will leave the lobby at 6:30, 7 and 7:30 p.m., with groups limited to 50 people per tour, so guests are encouraged to arrive early.

 


IJAMS hosts Haunted Lantern Tour

Join IJAMS for a Haunted Lantern Tour on October 28 and 29, 2014, at 7 p.m.

Did you know that some ghost hunters believe that both water and limestone can increase paranormal activity? If that’s true, then the quarries at IJAMS Nature Center in downtown Knoxville are the perfect place for a haunting.

The fee for this program is $7 for Ijams members and $10 for non-members. Tours meet at Ijams Nature Center, in the Mead’s Quarry parking lot.

Please call (865) 577-4717, ext. 110 to register.

IJAMS is a 300-acre urban greenspace and environmental learning center. Visit http://www.ijams.org for more information and a full calendar of events and programs.


Four Leaf Peat at Laurel Theater

Jubilee Community Arts presents Four Leaf Peat Friday, November 14, 2014 8 p.m. at at the Laurel Theater in Knoxville.

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Born out of Irish traditional music in pub sessions, Four Leaf Peat brings together musicians from various backgrounds: Chad Beauchaine on Fiddle; Gil Draper on guitar, bouzouki and mandolin; Rick Hall on hammer dulcimer, bones and bodhran; and Jason Herrera on vocals, bodhran, flute and whistle.  The band is scheduled to perform at the Laurel Theater November 14, 2014, at 8 p.m. Photo submitted.

Tickets: $12 and are available through KnoxTix at http://www.knoxtix.com, (865) 523-7521, and at the door.

The Laurel Theater is located on the corner of 16th and Laurel Avenue in the historic Fort Sanders neighborhood of Knoxville near the UT campus.

The mission of Jubilee Community Arts is 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation with a mission to promote, preserve and present the traditional performing arts of the southern Appalachian region and to nurture the cultural milieu responsible for the birth and evolution of these and related art forms.


Marine art on display in Knoxville

Art Market Gallery featured artists for November include acrylic painter George Rothery and functional artist Kathy Lovelace, both of Knoxville.

An opening reception for these exhibitions will be held from 5:30 to 9 p.m., Nov. 7, 2014 during downtown Knoxville’s monthly First Friday Art Walk, with complimentary refreshments and jazz/blues music performed by Melanie and the Meltones.

George A. Rothery Jr. is known for his marine art. He especially enjoys researching sea lore so that he can combine his keen interest in history with his love of art. Rothery’s paintings are in public and private collections coast to coast.

Kathy Lovelace specializes in painting the brook, brown and rainbow trout found in streams of the Great Smoky Mountains. Lovelace describes her work as “functional art” since her paintings are depicted on small furniture and home accessories.

For more information, call 865-525-5265.

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Marine art by George A. Rothery Jr., courtesy the artist.


Jazz lunch tribute to Dave Brubeck

The Knoxville Jazz Lunch series concert pays tribute to Dave Brubeck and Paul Desmond with saxophonist Bob Knapp on Wednesday, November 5, 2014, from noon to 1 pm at the Square Room in Market Square.

Admission to the concert is $15 and includes a lunch buffet served up by Café 4.

Pianist Dave Brubeck and alto saxophonist Paul Desmond were trail blazers in the cool jazz style of the 1950s. Their popularity on college campuses helped introduce a whole new generation of Americans to jazz, and the music that they created together has stood the test of time. Multi-instrumentalist reed man Bob Knapp examines the legacy and music of these two great icons in this special performance.

The Square Room is a new, state-of-the-art performance venue in downtown Knoxville, TN in the Historic Market Square district. It is housed in the rear of the 4 Market Square Building along with its counterpart Café 4, a full-service restaurant and coffee bar.


Boo! at the Knoxville Zoo kicks off

Knoxville, Tenn.— BOO! at the Zoo presented by U.S. Cellular® kicks off Thursday, Oct. 9, 2014 with safe and not-too-scary Halloween fun scheduled over three weekends.

BOO! at the Zoo, a Halloween tradition for 28 years, is a family event featuring trick-or-treating through the zoo along the BOO! Trail, the Madaris Monster Mash tent with music and activities perfect for preschool and elementary-aged event-goers, friendly costumed characters and entertainers throughout the zoo, and the only “haunted” carousel in East Tennessee, the Scary-Go-Round. (How can you tell it’s haunted? It goes backwards, of course.)

Boo! at the Zoo tickets are $7 per person. Children under two are admitted free. Parking is $5.

Tickets are available at in advance by phone at (865) 637-5331.


Old Gray lantern tour celebrates history

Part history, part theater, and all fundraiser, the annual Lantern and Carriage Tour at Old Gray Cemetery takes place on Sunday, September 28, 2014, from 4 – 7PM (rain or shine).

This event is an afternoon of food, fun, carriage rides, and some amazing stories of adversity and accomplishment told by historical reenactors throughout the cemetery during the tour.

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This year’s Old Gray Cemetery Lantern Tour takes place from 4-7 p.m., September 28, 2014, rain or shine. Photo by CelebrateKnoxville.com.

In addition, the site is now a Tennessee Urban Forestry Council arboretum. Marble stones, made possible by The Akima Club and Knoxville Garden Club, identify botanical and common names of over forty trees.

As you tour the facility and grounds, you’ll be met by historical characters (actresses, novelists, businessmen, soldiers, politicians, more) that would love to share their story with you.

Parking for this event will be across the street at St. John’s Lutheran Church, Emory Park Place and neighbor parking lots.

Entrance ticket: $ 10.00 for adults and $ 5.00 for students. Carriage ride additional fee $5.00. No Reservations Required.

The cemetery is located at 543 North Broadway, Knoxville, Tennessee.


Historic Homes of Knoxville host luncheon

The Historic Homes of Knoxville is hosting a noon luncheon on Friday, October 3, 2014, at The Foundry to celebrate the founding of the City of Knoxville 223 years ago.

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Blount Mansion, Knoxville.

The Historic Homes of Knoxville are uniformly significant in Tennessee’s accession as the 16th state in 1796. Apart from the paramount importance of their preservation, each house museum offers events and educational opportunities that benefit the community at large. Properties include Blount Mansion, Crescent Bend House & Gardens, Historic Ramsey House, James White’s Fort, Mabry-Hazen House, Marble Springs State Historic Site, and Historic Westwood.

Congressman John J. Duncan, Jr. of Tennessee’s 2nd congressional district will be the featured speaker.

Tickets are $50 and proceeds from the luncheon will benefit the Historic Homes. Purchase tickets by calling 865-523-7543.


Knoxville Zoo hosts Art Gone Wild!

Knoxville Zoo hosts the 2014 Art Gone Wild! a special after-hours event featuring original art playfully created by some of the zoo’s animals.

KnoxZoo

Art Gone Wild! sells original paintings by animal artists, along with customized gift items to raise funds for the zoo’s various enrichment programs. Photo courtesy Knoxville Zoo.

Art Gone Wild! will be held on Friday, September 19, 2014 from 6:00 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. at Knoxville Zoo. This special event is for guests 18 and up; attendees can enjoy wine, beer and hors d’oeuvres during the art sale.

Tickets are $30 per person and are available by phone by calling (865) 637-5331 or at the gate on the evening of the event.


Knoxville Zoo announces upgrades

Knoxville Zoo’s board of directors has approved a comprehensive strategic plan that will change the way visitors experience the zoo over the next five years. Knoxville Zoo will now begin development of a master plan to shape future animal habitats, guest amenities and immersive experiences that will dramatically transform the landscape of the zoo.

The first phase of the plan calls for updates to several of the zoo’s anchor habitats, including Malayan tigers and reptiles.

“The Knoxville Zoo is committed to being a place where families, especially children, and all guests come to learn and experience the world of animals and nature, as well as being a place where those animals are provided exceptional care,” said Lisa New, Knoxville Zoo Executive Director. “After almost a year of intense scrutiny and planning, we’re excited to unveil the new direction and believe that it will have a lasting impact for our community.”

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Artist rendering by Mike Kowalski of the new proposed Tiger Forest exhibit for the Knoxville Zoo. Fundraising plans and additional information about individual exhibit changes and upgrades will be announced as the next steps are finalized.


Knoxville Convention Center wins award

The Knoxville Convention Center was recently named Attraction of the Year by the Tennessee Hospitality and Tourism Association at the organization’s annual Stars of Industry award ceremony in Nashville.

The Knoxville Convention Center, managed by SMG, is located in downtown Knoxville adjacent to the Sunsphere. It boasts a 120,000-square-foot exhibit hall, a 27,000-square-foot divisible ballroom and 25 meeting rooms.

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Knoxville Convention Center General Manager Mary Bogert (center) accepts the Tennessee Hospitality and Tourism Association’s Attraction of the Year award from the TnHTA President and CEO Greg Adkins and TnHTA Board Chairman Danny Sumrall at the annual Stars of Industry awards ceremony in Nashville. Photo submitted.


IJAMS offers kayak adventure

With its towering 180-foot limestone cliff on the west side, Mead’s Quarry Lake is one of the most dramatic bodies of water in East Tennessee. IJAMS Nature Center is offering visitors an opportunity to explore the lake this weekend in a kayak.

Join Stephen Lyn at 8 a.m. on Saturday, August 16, 2014, for an early morning paddle about Mead’s Quarry Lake. Cost for this adventure in nature is $15 for Ijams members, $20 for non-members.

QuarryIjamssm

IJAMS is a 300-acre urban greenspace and environmental learning center with a mission of encouraging stewardship of the natural world. Photo by Laura Long Martin, Celebrate Knoxville.

Please call (865) 577-4717, ext. 119 for registration and information.


Red pandas born in Knoxville

Knoxville, Tenn.— Knoxville Zoo’s world-renowned red panda conservation program has marked another successful breeding season with the arrival of twin cubs, born at the Boyd Family Red Panda Village. The arrival of the two male cubs brings the number of red pandas born at Knoxville Zoo to 108, more than any other zoo in the world for this subspecies.

Red Panda Twins 1

The five –week-old cubs are the offspring of mother Scarlett and father Madan, and won’t start venturing outdoors until they are about three months old. Red pandas are endangered, primarily due to destruction of their native habitat, which extends from western Nepal to northern Myanmar.

For more information, please call 865.637.5331 ext. 300.


Knoxville train boards at new depot

This weekend, Saturday, June 26, 2014, the Three Rivers Rambler will take a very special steam train excursion out to the Historic Ramsey House for a two hour visit to watch the Dry Town Boys of Roane County take on the Knoxville Holstons in a 1864 style baseball game. Departure time will be at 11am; the return time to Volunteer Landing will be around 3:30pm.

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Starting in October, the Three Rivers Rambler will begin boarding from 2560 University Commons Way, a new depot at the University Commons, located off Cumberland Avenue (adjacent to the University of Tennessee). This new boarding area will slightly lengthen the train trip, so train times for the fall and winter excursions have changed.

Fares are adults: $26.50; Seniors (55+): $25.50; Children (3-12): $15.50; Toddlers (1-2): $7.50; and infants (under 1): Free.

Visit www.threeriversrambler.com for schedules.