KWG hosts open mic night

Knoxville Writers’ Guild will host its popular Holiday Open Mic and Potluck on Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017, at 7 p.m. at Central United Methodist Church. Members and anyone curious about KWG are encouraged to attend and to bring a covered dish or snack to share. This public event will be in the Fellowship Hall of the church, 201 E. Third Ave. Central United Methodist is a handicapped accessible building and offers plentiful free parking. A $2 donation at the door is suggested.

This is a wonderful event to meet other writers, buy and sell books, and enjoy holiday food with friends.

Guidelines for participants include:

1) You must be a current member of the Knoxville Writers’ Guild to read or sell books, although anyone may come to listen, mix and mingle. You can join or renew your membership before the readings begin. To establish speaker order, there will be a sign-up sheet at the door for those taking part.

2) What you read should be your own work or that of another guild member. If it will be the work of another KWG member, you are required to have permission to read his/her work.

3) Your reading time will be three to four minutes maximum, depending on the number of people who sign up.

4) What you read should be suitable for a general audience.

Members who wish to sell books will be given table space.

 

The Knoxville Writers Guild Membership is $30 and $15 for students. Visit www.knoxvillewritersguild.org.


Open house at history museum

(Knoxville, Tenn.) Cookies and apple cider will warm the day at the East Tennessee Historical Society’s Holiday Open House on Saturday, December 9, 2017 from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Activities include live music, craft demonstrations and the sale of handmade items, free ornament and craft making for the kids, balloon animals, local authors, and holiday refreshments.

Crafter Karen Micheletta will have a selection of her handmade items made from quilts to purchase. A WWI living historian will share the story of the Christmas Truce of 1914, a friendly ceasefire on the Western Front. In conjunction with the temporary exhibit Stories in Stitches: Quilts from the Permanent Collection of the East Tennessee Historical Society, Quilters Hall of Fame member Merikay Waldvogel and members of the Smoky Mountain Quilters Guild will offer a quilt sharing and gallery tours to discuss featured quilts.

Museum admission is free for the day. The Museum of East Tennessee is located at the East Tennessee History Center, 601 S. Gay Street, Knoxville. For more information, visit www.eastTNhistory.org or call 865-215-8824.


Sundress reading series continues

Knoxville, TN–Sundress Academy for the Arts is pleased to welcome Jasmine An, Penny Guisinger, and Denton Loving for the November installment of the reading series. The reading will take place 2-4 p.m. Sunday, November 12, at 2017 Hexagon Brewing Co., located at 1002 Dutch Valley Dr STE 101, Knoxville, TN 37918. The Sundress Reading Series is free and open to the public.

Jasmine An comes from the Midwest. She has also lived in Chiang Mai, Thailand, studying language, urban development and climate change, and blacksmithing. Her chapbook, Naming the No-Name Woman, won the 2015 Two Sylvias Press Chapbook Prize and her next, Monkey Was Here, is forthcoming in early 2018. Her work can be found or is forthcoming in HEArt, Stirring: A Literary Collection, Southern Humanities Review, and The Blueshift Journal, among others. She is a Hedgebrook alumna, and a PhD student in English & Women’s Studies at the University of Michigan.

Penny Guisinger is the author of Postcards from Here. Her work has appeared in Fourth Genre, River Teeth, Guernica, the Brevity blog, Solstice Literary Magazine, and others. Pushcart nominated, a Maine Literary Award winner, and twice named a notable in Best American Essays, she is the director of Iota: Conference of Short Prose and an assistant editor at Brevity. Penny is a graduate of the Stonecoast MFA Program.

Denton Loving is the author of the poetry collection Crimes Against Birds (Main Street Rag). He is also the editor of Seeking Its Own Level: an anthology of writings about water (MotesBooks). He teaches at Lincoln Memorial University, where he co- founded the annual Mountain Heritage Literary Festival and drafthorse: the literary journal of work and no work. His fiction, poetry, essays, and reviews have recently appeared in River Styx, CutBank, The Kenyon Review, and The Chattahoochee Review.

The Sundress Reading Series is an award-winning literary reading series that is held monthly at 2 p.m. at Hexagon Brewing Co. just outside of downtown Knoxville. For more information, Email safta@sundresspublications.com.


Get gruesome with Jack Neely

KNOXVILLE – In a Brown Bag Lecture on Wednesday, November 8, 2017, at noon, local historian Jack Neely will explore the topic of epidemics and major outbreaks in East Tennessee, including the Plague of 1838 and the Spanish Flu of 1918-1919. The program is presented by the East Tennessee Historical Society in partnership with the Knox County Public Library and is part of the National Endowment for the Arts’ Big Read.

Jack Neely is a well-known local author, historian, and the executive director of the Knoxville History Project.

The program is presented in partnership with the Knox County Public Library and is free and open to the public. The lecture will be held at the East Tennessee History Center, 601 S. Gay Street, Knoxville. Guests are invited to bring a “Brown Bag” lunch and enjoy the lecture. Soft drinks will be available.

For more information on the lecture, exhibitions, or museum hours, call 865-215-8824 or visit the website at www.EastTNHistory.org.


WDVX radio launches book

Knoxville, TN – East Tennessee’s WDVX radio is turning 20 years old. On Friday, November 3, 2017 and as part of downtown Knoxville’s First Friday, the East Tennessee Historical Society in partnership with WDVX will feature the debut of a new book about the history of WDVX and a panel discussion by book editors Wayne Bledsoe and Jay Clark, along with station founder Tony Lawson and WDVX hosts.

Books will be available for sale and signing. Also on view in the East Tennessee History Center lobby will be an accompanying exhibit about WDVX’s history and significance to the culture of East Tennessee. The exhibit will remain on view throughout November.

The program is presented in partnership with WDVX and the East Tennessee Historical Society. The panel discussion is free and open to the public and will begin at 6:00 p.m. with a light reception’s followed by the program at 7:00 p.m. at the East Tennessee History Center, 601 S. Gay Street, Knoxville.

For more information on the lecture, exhibitions, or museum hours, call 865-215-8824 or visit the website at www.EastTNHistory.org.


Stanley Plumly to read at UT

Knoxville, TN – Author Stanley Plumly will read at the University of Tennessee as part of UT’s Writers in the Library reading series on Monday, October 23, 2017 at 7 p.m. Stanley Plumly’s Old Heart (W. W. Norton, 2007) won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize and the Paterson Poetry Prize, and was a finalist for the National Book Award. Posthumous Keats: A Personal Biography (W. W. Norton, 2008) was runner-up for the PEN/Jacqueline Bograd Weld Award for Distinguished Biography. In 2010 Plumly was elected to membership in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Stanley Plumly’s most recent collection of poems, Orphan Hours, was published by W. W. Norton in 2012. His latest nonfiction work, The Immortal Evening: A Legendary Dinner with Keats, Wordsworth, and Lamb, was released from Norton in October of 2014. Plumly has taught at Princeton, Columbia, the University of Iowa, and the University of Michigan, among other places. He is currently a Distinguished Professor of English at the University of Maryland.

The reading begins at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of the John C. Hodges Library. The event is free and open to the public; all are encouraged to attend. There will also be a Q&A with the poet from 1-2PM in 1210 McClung Tower for UTK students and faculty.

The mission of Writers in the Library is to “showcase the work of novelists, poets, and other literary craftsmen.” Some of the best voices in contemporary literature are invited to read. The series is sponsored by the UT Libraries and the Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund.

For more information, contact Erin Elizabeth Smith, Jack E. Reese Writer-in-Residence at the UT Libraries, at esmith83@utk.edu or visit http://library.utk.edu/writers for a complete schedule of Writers in the Library readings for the 2017-2018 academic year.


Attorney to speak to writing group

Mark P. Crockett, an attorney with the intellectual property firm of Luedecka Neely, will speak on Thursday, October 5, 2017 on the topic “What Writers Must Know About Libel, Slander, and Copyright.” This informal but expert presentation will be at 7 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall of Central United Methodist Church, 201 East Third Street. Admission is a suggested donation of $2.

Plentiful, free parking is available in lots to the back and side of the church, which is wheelchair accessible. Along with cookies and coffee, you’ll find KWG hospitality and community support.

Crockett will cover such questions as: If you write memoirs, how can libel laws affect you? When and how can you safely incorporate another person’s work in your own? How do you protect your own work? If you are reading your work aloud, what laws apply?

Crockett is a cum laude graduate of the University of Tennessee College of Law. Please note that while he will give an overview of writers’ legal rights and responsibilities, he will not address individual cases or give legal advice. He will tell audience members how to protect themselves and when to get professional help. Participants will learn how to save themselves a lot of trouble and protect their creative work. This program is essential for anybody serious about writing!

The Knoxville Writers Guild welcomes your participation. Membership is $30 and $15 for students. Visit www.knoxvillewritersguild.org.


Knox Library hosts Chekhov fest

KNOXVILLE, TN – Readers are invited to join fellow book-lovers at the Knox County Public Library for an in-depth look into the stories of Anton Chekhov, the father of the modern short story. Professor Natalia Pervukhin, author of Anton Chekhov: The Sense and the Nonsense, will lead the discussions at Lawson McGhee Library October 3 & 10, 2017, at 6:30 pm. Stories scheduled to be explored include Joy, Object d’Art, A Daughter of Albion, A Defenseless Creature, A Silly Frenchman, In a Strange Land, Sleepy, and Enemies .

The Check Out Chekhov event is part of ChekhovFest, hosted by the University of Tennessee’s Dept. of Modern Foreign Languages and Literatures and is being held in conjunction with Clarence Brown Theatre’s production of Three Sisters.

The Lawson McGhee Library is located at 500 W Church Avenue in downtown Knoxville.

For more information about ChekhovFest go to mfll.utk.edu/chekhov.


Novelists to read at UT

KNOXVILLE, TN – Novelists Michael Shou-Yung Shum and Jesse Goolsby will read at the University of Tennessee on Monday, October 2, 2017. . The event is part of UT’s Writers in the Library reading series. The reading begins at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of the John C. Hodges Library. The event is free and open to the public; all are encouraged to attend. A brown bag Q&A, open to University of Tennessee students, will be held at noon in 1210 McClung Tower.

Born and raised in Houston, Texas, Michael Shou-Yung Shum eventually found himself dealing poker in a dead-end casino in Lake Stevens, Washington. Two doctorates bookend this turn of events: the first in Psychology from Northwestern, and the second in English from University of Tennessee. Along the way, Michael spent a dozen years in Chicago, touring the country as a rave DJ. He currently resides in Astoria, Queens, with Jaclyn Watterson and three cats. Queen of Spades (Forest Avenue Press) is his first novel.

Jesse Goolsby is the author of the novel I’d Walk with My Friends If I Could Find Them (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt). His fiction and essays have appeared in places like EPOCH, The Kenyon Review, Narrative Magazine and Salon. He is the recipient of the Richard Bausch Short Story Prize and the John Gardner Memorial Award in Fiction, among other honors. A US Air Force officer, Goolsby holds a Masters in English from the University of Tennessee and a PhD in Creative Writing from Florida State University.

The reading begins at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of the John C. Hodges Library. The event is free and open to the public; all are encouraged to attend. A brown bag Q&A, open to University of Tennessee students, will be held at noon in 1210 McClung Tower.

The mission of Writers in the Library is to “showcase the work of novelists, poets, and other literary craftsmen.” Some of the best voices in contemporary literature are invited to read. The series is sponsored by the UT Libraries and the Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund.

For more information, contact Erin Elizabeth Smith, Jack E. Reese Writer-in-Residence at the UT Libraries, at esmith83@utk.edu or visit http://library.utk.edu/writers for a complete schedule of Writers in the Library readings for the 2017-2018 academic year.


Author highlights new novel

KNOXVILLE, TN – Popular Appalachian author and New York Times best-seller Sharyn McCrumb will be at the East Tennessee History Center on October 10, 2017 as part of a launch tour for her new book, The Unquiet Grave. Set in 19th century West Virginia, McCrumb’s novel is based on the true story of one of the strangest murder trials in American history — the case of the Greenbrier Ghost.

McCrumb uses genealogical research and historical documents to uncover the complex characters and details behind the 1897 death of Zona Heaster in Greenbrier, West Virginia, a story well known to American folklorists. Heaster, a beautiful and willful 24 year-old, marries the town blacksmith and moves to a farm twenty miles from her family, only to die several weeks later of complications from a fall. Zona’s mother claims she was visited by the ghost of her daughter, who came to tell her that she had been murdered. The mother is determined to seek justice for her daughter. An autopsy is conducted that supports her claims and a trial follows. Through The Unquiet Grave Sharyn McCrumb brings to life the interesting characters, the defense attorney, a pro-Union bridgeburner and former slave owner; and the mother of the murdered woman, who relentlessly sticks to her ghost story—all seen through the eyes of a young black lawyer on the cusp of a new century.

The October 10 event at the East Tennessee History Center begins with a light reception at 6:30 p.m., followed by a lecture and book signing 7:00 p.m. The program is free and open to the public.

McCrumb, who was named a “Virginia Woman of History” in 2008 for Achievement in Literature, received the 2011 Perry F. Kendig Award for Achievement in Literary Arts from the Blue Ridge Arts Council of southwest Virginia. McCrumb’s many honors include: Appalachian Writers Association Book of the Year Award; the Wilma Dykeman Award for Literature given by the East Tennessee Historical Society; the Audie Award for Best Recorded Book; AWA Outstanding Contribution to Appalachian Literature Award; the Chaffin Award for Southern Literature; the Plattner Award for Short Story; and AWA’s Best Appalachian Novel. She was the first writer-in-residence at King College in Tennessee. In 2005 she was honored as the Writer of the Year at Emory & Henry College.

About the ETHS
Established in 1834, the East Tennessee Historical Society is widely acknowledged as one of the most active history organizations in the state and enjoys a national reputation for excellence in programming and education. For 183 years the East Tennessee Historical Society has been helping East Tennesseans hold on to our unique heritage—recording the events, collecting the artifacts, and saving the stories that comprise the history we all share.

About Friends of the Knox County Public Library
Friends of the Knox County Public Library is a non-profit organization whose mission is to foster a love of libraries, books and reading in the Knox County area. The organization raises funds to sponsor community outreach programs, represent the interests of Knox County library patrons, and support a variety of services offered by the local library system that would otherwise not be available due to budget or staff restrictions.

The free event is presented by the East Tennessee Historical Society and the Friends of the Knox County Public Library. The reception begins at 6:30 p.m., with the presentation at 7:00 p.m., followed by a book signing. The East Tennessee History Center is located at 601 S. Gay Street, Knoxville. Ms. McCrumb will be signing books following her lecture. For more information on the lecture, exhibitions, or museum hours, call 865-215-8824 or visit the website at www.EastTNHistory.org.


Author Quade is speaker at UT

KNOXVILLE, TN – On Monday, September 25, 2017 Kirstin Valdez Quade will read at the University of Tennessee. The event is part of UT’s Writers in the Library reading series. Kirstin Valdez Quade is the author of Night at the Fiestas, winner of the John Leonard Prize, the Sue Kaufman Prize, and a “5 Under 35” award from the National Book Foundation.

“Set mainly in tight-knit Catholic, Mexican-American communities in New Mexico,” write the Dallas Morning News, Night at the Fiestas “enthralls with tales of people striving to better their lives while enduring the aftermath of past mistakes.” The New York Times calls three of Quade’s stories from Night at the Fiestas “legitimate masterpieces” and goes on to say, “This is a variety of beauty too rare in contemporary literature.”

Kirstin Valdez Quade’s work has also appeared in The New Yorker, The Southern Review, and Guernica, and it has been anthologized in The Best American Short Stories and The O. Henry Prize Stories. Currently she is an assistant professor of creative writing at Princeton University.

The reading begins at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of the John C. Hodges Library. The event is free and open to the public; all are encouraged to attend. A brown bag Q&A, open to University of Tennessee students, will be held at noon in 1210 McClung Tower.

The mission of Writers in the Library is to “showcase the work of novelists, poets, and other literary craftsmen.” Some of the best voices in contemporary literature are invited to read. The series is sponsored by the UT Libraries and the Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund.

For more information, contact Erin Elizabeth Smith, Jack E. Reese Writer-in-Residence at the UT Libraries, at esmith83@utk.edu or visit http://library.utk.edu/writers for a complete schedule of Writers in the Library readings for the 2017-2018 academic year.


Sundress presents literary readings

Knoxville, TN–Sundress Academy for the Arts welcomes Tanque R. Jones, Shannon Elizabeth Hardwick, and Erica Wright for the August installment of this year’s reading series. The reading will take place 2-4 p.m. Sunday, August 27, 2017 at a NEW location: Hexagon Brewing Co., located at 1002 Dutch Valley Dr STE 101, Knoxville, TN 37918. The Sundress Reading Series is free and open to the public.

Tanque R. Jones was one of the first poets to receive an MFA from the University of Tennessee in 2014. Her poems have appeared in Connecticut River Review, Colere, West Trade Review, and Clackamas Literary Review. Her first book, Woman in Transition, was published by WordTech Communications in 2016. In this sultry, hard-hitting collection, the poet is a truth-teller, speaking of race and class in East Tennessee, embodying strength and honor.

Shannon Elizabeth Hardwick’s work has appeared in Salt Hill, Stirring, Versal, The Texas Observer, Devil’s Lake, and Four Way Review, among others. She is listed as a contributor of both poetry and prose in A Shadow Map: An Anthology of Survivors of Sexual Assault published by Civil Coping Mechanisms. Hardwick has chapbooks out with Thrush Press and Mouthfeel Press, and serves as the poetry editor for The Boiler Journal. Before Isadore is her first full-length collection.

Erica Wright is the author of the poetry collections All the Bayou Stories End with Drowned (Black Lawrence Press, 2017) and Instructions for Killing the Jackal (Black Lawrence Press, 2011). Her poems have appeared in Crazyhorse, Denver Quarterly, Gulf Coast, New Orleans Review, and elsewhere. She is the poetry editor at Guernica Magazine as well as an editorial board member of Alice James Books. Her latest novel is The Granite Moth (Pegasus, 2015).

The Sundress Reading Series is an award-winning literary reading series that is held monthly at 2PM at Hexagon Brewing Co. just outside of downtown Knoxville.

For more information:
EMAIL: safta@sundresspublications.com, FACEBOOK: SundressAcademyfortheArts
PHONE: (865) 560-6106 TWITTER: @SundressPub


Forensic science topic of lecture

(Knoxville, TN) In a Brown Bag Lecture on Wednesday, July 12, 2017, Arthur Bohanan will discuss his new book, Prints of a Man, detailing his career of 55 years in the criminal justice field. A curious mind and a high school interest in fingerprints took him from Sevier County, Tennessee to the top of his profession as a forensics specialist, inventor, and crime solver with awards and honors too numerous to list.

Bohanan is perhaps best known for his invention of a method to take fingerprints from a dead body and for his work to identify bodies from the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center. His pioneering work included the discovery of the chemical composition of children’s fingerprints and their change at puberty from a water base to an oil base, a key factor when working with the AMBER Alert system and missing children. Bohanan will also discuss his latest fascinating research to discover the rate of decay, cemeteries washed out by floods and hurricanes, and to locate and gender the long dead, in which he reports a 99 percent accuracy on blind testing.

The program is sponsored by the Gentry Griffey Funeral Chapel and Crematory and is free and open to the public. The lecture will begin at noon at the East Tennessee History Center, 601 S. Gay Street, Knoxville. Guests are invited to bring a “Brown Bag” lunch and enjoy the lecture. Soft drinks will be available.

For more information on the lecture, exhibitions, or museum hours, call 865-215-8824 or visit the website at www.EastTNHistory.org.


Writers guild offers open mic

If you were thinking about joining a writer’s group to promote your work, now would be an excellent time to join the Knoxville Writers’ Guild. Members of the Knoxville Writers’ Guild will have an opportunity to read their work at the Guild’s annual Open Mic Night on Thursday, July 6, 2017.

The event, which will be open to the public, will begin at 7 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall of Central United Methodist Church, 201 3rd Avenue. A $2 donation is requested at the door. Parking is plentiful and free.

“The annual Knoxville Writers’ Guild’s Open Mic program is one of our most popular of the year. It is a great way to hear the work of other writers and have a good time,” said President Donna Kapa.

To ensure as many people as possible have the chance to read, the Guild follows these guidelines:

1) You must be a current member of the Knoxville Writers’ Guild to read your work. You may join or renew your membership at the event ($30, with discount to $15 for students). There will be a sign-up sheet at the door for readers. Writers sign up on a first come, first serve basis.

2) You may only read your own work or that of another KWG member with their written permission.

3) Podium time is two to three minutes maximum, depending on the number of people who sign up. Three minutes is about one and a half double-spaced pages. A reader’s time includes any explanation, set-up or backstory. There are no exceptions. Readers should time their segment in advance.

4) The content of what you read should be suitable for a general audience.

Attendees are also invited to bring a book to swap with fellow writers. If your book is not picked up, you are welcome to leave it behind to become a raffle item at a future Guild meeting. Book swap starts at 6:30 before the Open Mic.

Visit www.knoxvillewritersguild.org.


Food writing workshop offered

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. – Erin Elizabeth Smith, poet, editor, publisher, teacher, shows the ingredients of great food writing that stimulates the senses, illuminates regional culture, and advances fine writing. The workshop will take place Saturday, May 13, 2017 at 10:00 am.

Erin says, “Southern food has always been more than fried chicken and biscuits—it’s the story of our grandmother’s hands, a lyric of hardship, the rush of the first summer tomato reddening on the vine.” This multi-genre workshop will focus on how Southern food culture can help to inform our stories, poetry, and memoirs. Participants will discuss ways to incorporate elements of the Southern history and mythos of our cuisine into their work. The workshop also includes a cooking demo as well as a collection of recipes from across the South to take home with you.

The public is invited to the workshop, which will will be held in the Fellowship Hall of Central United Methodist Church, 201 East Third Avenue. The cost to attend is $50 (payable at the door by cash, check, or card), with a 40% discount offered to Knoxville Writers’ Guild Members and a 50% discount to students. Scholarships are available for all Knoxville Writers’ Guild programs. To register or to apply for a scholarship, please contact Pamela Schoenewaldt at p.schoene@comcast.net Pre-registration is required.

Erin Elizabeth Smith teaches poetry writing, public writing, and a variety of literature and genre classes including Women in American Literature and Introduction to Poetry at the University of Tennessee. She is the author of two full-length collections, The Naming of Strays (Gold Wake 2011) and The Fear of Being Found, which will be re-released by Zoetic Press in 2016.

Smith’s poetry and nonfiction have appeared in 32 Poems, Mid-American, The Yalobusha Review, New Delta Review, Florida Review, Third Coast, Crab Orchard, West Branch, and Willow Springs, among others. In 2009, she graduated with her PhD in Creative Writing from the Center for Writers at the University of Southern Mississippi. In 1999, she founded Stirring: A Literary Collection, and since then has also served as the managing editor of Sundress Publications and the Best of the Net Anthology (2006-2013). Smith currently lives in Oak Ridge, TN where she is the Creative Director for Sundress Academy for the Arts at Firefly Farms.

The Knoxville Writers’ Guild exists to facilitate a broad and inclusive community for area writers, provide a forum for information, support and sharing among writers, help members improve and market their writing skills and promote writing and creativity. Additional information can be found at www.KnoxvilleWritersGuild.org www.facebook.com/KnoxWritersGuild
Instagram @KnoxvilleWritersGuild


Editors speak at Writers’ Guild

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. – Editors of three prestigious literary journals, Alexis Williams of New Millennium Writings, Richard Hermes of Grist, and Marianne Worthington of Still will explain what they’re looking for and how they work at the May program of the Knoxville Writers’ Guild. The program will take place Thursday, May 4, 2017 at 7:00 pm.

The public is invited to the program, which will be held in the Fellowship Hall of Central United Methodist Church, 201 East Third Avenue. Admission is a suggested $2 and parking is free.

Alexis Williams has been a part of New Millennium Writings (NMW) since its founding in 1996. An honors graduate of Middle Tennessee State University with a B.A. in English Literature, she spent several years working in higher education and in corporate communications and publishing, before taking over as Editor of NMW in 2012. She has to date published hundreds of writers within the pages of NMW and looks forward to many more years of rewarding and publishing members of the writing community.

Richard Hermes is a Ph.D. candidate in the creative writing program at the University of Tennessee. His awards include Minnesota Monthly’s Tamarack Award, a Minnesota State Arts Board grant, and a Luce Scholars fellowship to Thailand, where he worked as a writer and editor for eight years. His favorite invisible city is currently Euphemia.

Marianne Worthington grew up in Knoxville, Tennessee and moved to southeastern Kentucky in 1990 where she works as a teacher, editor & writer. In 2009 she co-founded Still: The Journal, an online literary journal with Silas House & Jason Howard. She has a poetry chapbook, Larger Bodies Than Mine, from Finishing Line Press, and she edited the first three volumes of the Motif anthology series from MotesBooks. She am also poetry editor (and the former book reviews editor) for Now & Then: The Appalachian Magazine.

The Knoxville Writers’ Guild exists to facilitate a broad and inclusive community for area writers, provide a forum for information, support and sharing among writers, help members improve and market their writing skills and promote writing and creativity. Additional information can be found at www.KnoxvilleWritersGuild.org.


Poets read for library series

KNOXVILLE, TN – On Monday, March 27, 2017 poets Maria James-Thiaw and Bobby C. Rogers will present readings at the University of Tennessee. The event is part of UT’s Writers in the Library reading series. The mission of Writers in the Library is to showcase the work of novelists, poets, and other literary craftsmen. Some of the best voices on the literary scene today are invited to read.

The reading begins at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of the John C. Hodges Library. The event is free and open to the public; all are encouraged to attend.

Maria James-Thiaw began bringing poems to life on stages during the spoken word revolution of the mid-nineties. Her works have been published in several journals including Cutthroat Journal of the Arts, Black Magnolias, Love Your Rebellion, the Spirit Speaks anthology, and others. She serves on the board of Philadelphia Stories and the Writer’s Wordshop. She is the author of three poetry collections including “Talking ‘White,’” which deals with issues of class and culture while celebrating our literary history. She is a professor of writing in the Department of English and Communication at Central Penn College in Pennsylvania.

Bobby C. Rogers is Professor of English and Writer-in-Residence at Union University. His first book, “Paper Anniversary,” won the Agnes Lynch Starrett Poetry Prize. In 2015, he was named a Witter Bynner Fellow at the Library of Congress by Poet Laureate Charles Wright. His new book, “Social History,” has just been released by LSU Press in their Southern Messenger Poets series.

Writers in the Library is sponsored by the UT Libraries and the Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund.

For more information, contact Erin Elizabeth Smith, Jack E. Reese Writer-in-Residence at the UT Libraries, atesmith83@utk.edu or visit http://library.utk.edu/writers for a complete schedule of Writers in the Library readings for the 2016-2017 academic year.


RB Morris at KWG meeting

Prominent  poet, songwriter and musician RB Morris, Knoxville’s first Poet Laureate, will speak at the March 2, 2017 meeting of the Knoxville Writers’ Guild.

“I’ll be talking about poetry and songwriting, and some of the current projects I’m involved in as Poet Laureate, perhaps sing a song or two and read a few poems,” Morris said. He’ll also field questions about his creative process as writer in multiple art forms.

The public is invited to the program, which will be at 7 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall of Central United Methodist Church, 201 East Third Avenue, where you will find a large, free parking lot. Admission is a suggested $2.

Morris has been a driving artistic force in Knoxville, reflecting the city in his poetry and music. He wrote and acted in “The Man Who Lives Here is Looney,” a one-man play taken from the life and work of James Agee. He was instrumental in the founding of a park in Fort Sanders dedicated to Agee.

Morris’s published books of poetry include “Early Fires” (Iris Press), “Keeping the Bees Employed” and “The Mockingbird Poems” (Rich Mountain Bound). His music albums include “Spies Lies and Burning Eyes” and his most recent solo project, “Rich Mountain Bound.”

R B Morris served as the Jack E. Reese Writer-in-Residence at the University of Tennessee 2004-2008. He was inducted into the East Tennessee Writers Hall of Fame in 2009.


New voices at Knoxville Writers Guild

The Knoxville Writer’s Guild’s Thursday, February 2, 2017 program, “Bold New Voices,” features three electrifying, socially and politically engaged young poets and performing artists at the Fellowship Hall of Central United Methodist Church, 201 S. Third Avenue, Knoxville, starting at 7 p.m.

Rhea Carmon is a mathematician, poet, singer, youth mentor and creator of the powerful Fifth Woman group, inspiring women to “step on stage and bare their souls in front of an audience.” Her monthly reggae-inspired poetry slams excite and nurture scores of young poets. Photo courtesy Knoxville Writers Guild.

Jeb Herrin brings his dramatic experience as a medic in Iraq to his work in the MFA program at the University of Tennessee. His work takes us deep into the soldier’s journey from training to deployment, and then back to civilian world, where another battle for survival begins.

Ben McClendon’s work is widely published, exploring ecology, politics, and the power of queer love in an age of profound environmental risk. Poetry, he says, “is well situated to explore, celebrate, and inquire into all things ecological because its tradition has always been to explore the human, and through us the world.”

Knoxville Writers Guild meetings are open to the public. A $2 donation is requested at the door.


Poet Joy Harjo reads at UT

Internationally recognized poet, author, musician, and playwright Joy Harjo will read from her work on the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, campus as part of the Writers in the Library reading series. Harjo’s reading on Monday, January 23, 2017 will take place in the John C. Hodges Library auditorium at 7 p.m. The reading is free and open to the public.

Joy Harjo is the author of fourteen books, including eight books of poetry and two chapbooks. Her most recent book of poems, Conflict Resolution with Holy Beings (W.W. Norton, 2015) won the Wallace Stevens Award for Lifetime Achievement from the Academy of American Poets. Other well-known volumes of poetry include How We Became Human: New and Selected Poems, The Woman Who Fell from the Sky, In Mad Love and War, and She Had Some Horses. A few of her many honors include a Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship, the New Mexico Governor’s Award for Excellence in the Arts, the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Native Writers Circle of the Americas, and the William Carlos Williams Award from the Poetry Society of America. For A Girl Becoming, a young adult/coming-of-age book, was released in 2009.

Harjo is currently working on a play, Wings of Night Sky, Wings of Morning Light, forthcoming from Wesleyan University, and Song Lines of Justice, a historical memoir, for W. W. Norton. Her musical play, “We Were There When Jazz Was Born,” has been commissioned by the New York Public Theater. Harjo has released five award-winning CDs of original music and in 2009 won a Native American Music Award (NAMMY) for Best Female Artist of the Year for Winding Through the Milky Way. Her most recent CD release is a traditional flute album, Red Dreams, A Trail Beyond Tears. She performs nationally and internationally with her band, the Arrow Dynamics. She has received a Rasmuson US Artists Fellowship and is a founding board member of the Native Arts and Cultures Foundation. Harjo writes a column, “Comings and Goings,” for her tribal newspaper, the Muscogee Nation News.

Harjo was appointed to a Chair of Excellence in Creative Writing at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, in 2016. She brings to the Creative Writing Program and to the university expertise in Native American studies, as well as distinction in poetry, creative non-fiction, drama, children’s books, and music. Her public service is as extensive as her publications. Currently she is co-judging the 2015 National Book Award in poetry.

Writers in the Library is sponsored by the UT Libraries and the Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund. For more information, contact Erin Elizabeth Smith, Jack E. Reese Writer-in-Residence at the UT Libraries, at esmith83@utk.edu.


Knox Library celebrates O’Connor

In January 2017, Knox County Public Library System is exploring the life and work of Flannery O’Connor, the woman who arguably created “Southern Gothic” literature with her haunting stories and eccentric characters. Join us for a six-part series led by Ed Francisco, Professor of English and writer-in-residence at Pellissippi State Community College.

The series kicks off on Sunday, January 8, 2017 with a screening of the award-winning documentary Flannery O’Connor: Uncommon Grace followed by a discussion with its filmmakers, Bridget Kurt and Michael Jordan.

The series continues each Tuesday evening in January at Lawson McGhee Library with a discussion of one of O’Connor’s seminal short stories.

January 10: “Good Country People”
January 17: “A Displaced Person”​
Sunday, January 22, the series will screen John Huston’s Wise Blood.
January 24: “A Good Man is Hard to Find”
January 31: Conclusion

Despite her premature death at age 39, Flannery O’Connor left behind one of the most haunting and strikingly original bodies of work in 20th century literature. With the rural South as her backdrop, she brought to life a string of eccentric characters torn between their worldy ambitions and the need for a more enduring truth. While critics called her stories “brutal” and “grotesque,” O’Connor said, “All my stories are about the action of grace on a character who is not very willing to support it.”

The Lawson McGhee Library is the main library of Knox County Public Library in Knoxville, Tennessee. It is located at 500 West Church Avenue in downtown Knoxville.


Knoxville Writers meet January 5

New York Times bestselling author Bob Mayer will talk about changes in the publishing industry at the 7 p.m., Jan. 5, 2016 meeting of the Knoxville Writers’ Guild. The public is invited to the program, which will be at the Fellowship Hall of Knoxville’s Central United Methodist Church, 201 East Third Avenue. Enter at the back, where parking is free and plentiful. Admission is a suggested $2. The building is handicapped accessible.

Mayer, author of more than 70 books including the #1 bestselling series Area 51, Atlantis, and the Green Berets, will help authors navigate through the latest information on various forms of publishing options.

“Publishing is changing exponentially, and today’s writer must be aware of these changes in order to succeed. This workshop is designed to help authors navigate through the latest information on various forms of publishing options,” he said.

He will talk about traditional, ePublishing, Print on Demand, self-publishing, vanity, and more. “We will cover the advantages and disadvantages all these venues to help you, the writer, decide what’s the best choice for you and your work,” he said.

Mayer is a graduate of West Point and a former Green Beret (including commanding an A-Team). Born in the Bronx and having traveled the world (usually not the tourist spots), he now lives peacefully with his wife and two Labs. His web site is www.bobmayer.com.


Knoxville writers host potluck supper

Members of the Knoxville Writers’ Guild will share their works and hold a mix and mingle potluck for December’s monthly program. Both current members and the public are encouraged to attend and to bring a covered dish or holiday snack.

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The event will begin at 7 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 1, 2016 at Central United Methodist Church’s Fellowship Hall, 201 E. Third Ave. Attendees should enter off of the large parking lot behind the church. A $2 donation is welcome at the door with free and accessible parking available.

We will also have sales tables provided for KWG members to sell their work.

For those interested in reading, there are a few simple guidelines:

1) You must be a current member of the Knoxville Writers’ Guild. You can join or renew your membership before the readings begin. There will be a sign-up sheet at the door for those taking part to establish speaker order.

2) What you read should be your own work or that of another group member. If it will be the work of another KWG member, you are required to have permission to read his/her work.

3) Your reading time will be three minutes maximum. It’s not necessary that your reading last the full amount of time allotted. For instance, if you have a one-minute poem and don’t have anything else you’d like to read, that would be fine.

4) What you read should be suitable for a general audience. In other words, please show courtesy to those attending. Think of approaching your reading as something to be shared and appreciated by one-and-all.

The Knoxville Writers Guild membership is $30 and $15 for students. Visit www.knoxvillewritersguild.org.


UT series features best-selling author

Author Bret Anthony Johnston will read from his work on Monday, November 7, 2016 at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, as part of the Writers in the Library series. The reading will be in the Hodges Library auditorium at 7 p.m. It is free and open to the public.

Bret Anthony Johnston is the author of the internationally best-selling novel Remember Me Like This, which was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year, a Barnes and Noble Discover Great New Writers selection, and the winner of the 2015 McLaughlin-Esstman-Stearns Prize. Johnston is also the author of the award-winning Corpus Christi: Stories, which was named a Best Book of the Year by the Independent (London) and the Irish Times. His work appears in The Atlantic Monthly, Esquire, The Paris Review, Glimmer Train Stories, Virginia Quarterly Review, The Best American Short Stories, and elsewhere.

His nonfiction has appeared in the New York Times, New York Times Magazine, Wall Street Journal, Tin House, The Best American Sports Writing, and on NPR’s All Things Considered.

A graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, Johnston is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Literature Fellowship, a Pushcart Prize, and a Glasgow Prize for Emerging Writers, among other awards. Johnston teaches in the Bennington Writing Seminars and at Harvard University, where he is the director of creative writing.

In addition to the public reading, there will be a Q&A for students at 3:30 p.m. in 1210 McClung Tower, also on November 7.

Writers in the Library is sponsored by the UT Libraries and the Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund. For more information, contact Erin Elizabeth Smith, Jack E. Reese Writer-in-Residence at the UT Libraries, at esmith83@utk.edu.

Visit http://library.utk.edu/writers for a complete schedule of Writers in the Library readings for the 2016-2017 academic year.

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Email: esmith83@utk.edu


Book celebrates local music

(Knoxville, TN) Knoxville’s Mid-Day Merry-Go-Round and its cast of musicians are the subject of a lecture and book signing by Ruth B. White at the East Tennessee History Center, November 6, 2016. The occasion celebrates the launch of White’s new book, Knoxville’s ‘Merry-Go-Round,’ Ciderville, and the East Tennessee Music Scene.

The noonday show was broadcast live from WNOX for more than twenty years and attracted a loyal and enthusiastic audience. The host of on-air talent include many who went on to Nashville to become country greats, such as Roy Acuff, Chet Atkins, Archie Campbell, Don Gibson, the Carters, Homer and Jethro, and Carl Smith, to only name a few.

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Knoxville’s ‘Merry-Go-Round,’ Ciderville, and the East Tennessee Country Music Scene is a warm, sometimes hilarious, insider’s look back at this early period of country music, the stories behind the lyrics, and the shared laughter, tragedies, and tears of the Merry-Go-Round cast.

Ruth married Harold White in 1965. He had been a steel guitarist on the Merry-Go-Round and was playing with Grand Ole Opry superstar Hank Williams when they met. Together they became an important part of the Nashville music scene, Harold as a musician and “song plugger,” and Ruth in music publishing.
David West and the Cider Mountain Boys will provide a nostalgic look at music popular in the Merry-Go-Round heyday. A banjoist, David played with the Bonnie Lou and Buster Show, then as a regular on the Cas Walker Show until it went off the air. An astute businessman, he is involved in many local enterprises, but his real love is the operation of Ciderville, selling musical instruments and one of the largest Martin Guitar dealers in the country. It also serves as a popular venue for country music performances. Ruth devotes a chapter in her book to David and Ciderville, describing it as a place where “sounds Nashville has forgotten, original sounds of the mountains and rural areas” are still being played.

A foreword by WNTT-AM radio host James Perry introduces the book.

The program at the East Tennessee History Center is from 2:30-4:30 p.m., Sunday, November 6. The event is free and open to the public. The East Tennessee History Center is located at 601 S. Gay Street, Knoxville. For more information on the lecture, exhibitions, or museum hours, call 865-215-8824 or visit the website at www.EastTNHistory.org.


Books donated to Knox Library

Copies of “The Final Season: The Perseverance of Pat Summitt” have been donated to Knox County Public Library. Summitt was the winningest coach in the history of NCAA Division I basketball. With 1,098 victories and eight national championships, she established the Lady Vols as the top women’s athletics program in the country.

Knox County Public Library offers more than 1.5 million books, periodicals, compact discs, films, audiobooks and downloadables through 19 locations across Knox County including one of the premier historical and genealogical collections in the Southeast.

“We are very grateful for this generous donation,” said Janet Drumheller, head of collection development for Knox County Public Library. “Pat Summitt will always be such an inspiration to our community, and we are so happy to share her story with our patrons through Maria’s book.”

Summitt was diagnosed with early onset dementia in 2011 and coached her final season in 2011-12. Summitt died June 28, 2016, at the age of 64.

The book was authored by Moxley Carmichael writer/editor Maria M. Cornelius. The public relations firm made the donation of the books to the library.

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Janet Drumheller and Mary Pom Claiborne, both of Knox County Public Library, accept 20 copies of “The Final Season: The Perseverance of Pat Summitt” from Alan Carmichael, far right, and Maria Cornelius, both of Moxley Carmichael. The books will be in circulation at every library branch and the main downtown facility. A book also will be placed in the permanent and non-circulated collection at McClung Museum. Photo submitted.


Writers group names contest winners

The Knoxville Writers’ Guild is proud to announce winners from the 2016 Annual Writing Contest at the Thursday, Oct. 6 meeting. The meeting is open to the public and will begin at 7 p.m. in Central United Methodist Church’s Fellowship Hall at 201 E. Third Ave.

Attendees should enter off the large parking lot behind the church. A $2 donation is welcome at the door with free and accessible parking available.

This year, the KWG received more than 150 entries in the categories of poetry, creative nonfiction, novel excerpt, literary short fiction, and Young Writers. Several winners from these categories will read their winning entry at the meeting.

A complete list of winners will be available soon at www.knoxvillewritersguild.org.


Authors to speak on TN history

Tennessee Technological University professors Calvin Dickinson and Michael Birdwell will discuss their new book People of the Upper Cumberland: Achievements and Contradictions in a Brown Bag Lecture at noon on Wednesday, October 12, 2016. The anthology, recently named the “Tennessee History Book of the Year” by the Tennessee Library Association, presents a complex view of the rich history and culture of the Tennessee-Kentucky Upper Cumberland, an area composed of the 24 counties that mostly border the eastern half of the Cumberland River.
Birdwell and Dickinson will discuss the history of the region, politicians, moonshiners, changing medical practices, women’s roles, race relations, and more. Also featured will be a few of the Upper Cumberland’s most famous residents, Cordell Hull, John Gore, John Catron, Charles Faulkner Bryan, and Champ Ferguson. The book will be available for purchase and signing by Dickinson and Birdwell following the lecture.

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Dr. Michael E. Birdwell is a professor of history at Tennessee Technological University and the author of several books, including Celluloid Soldiers: Warner Brothers Campaign against Nazism and Rural Life and Culture of the Upper Cumberland. Birdwell also serves as the chair of the Tennessee Great Wars Commission. Dr. W. Calvin Dickinson is a professor emeritus of history at Tennessee Technological University. He currently serves on the Tennessee Historical Commission and has written or co-authored more than 22 books, including Sister States, Enemy States: The Civil War in Kentucky and Tennessee and Tennessee: State of the Nation.

The program is sponsored by Consolidated Nuclear Security, LLC and is free and open to the public. The lecture will begin at noon at the East Tennessee History Center, 601 S. Gay Street, Knoxville. Guests are invited to bring a “Brown Bag” lunch and enjoy the lecture. Soft drinks will be available.

For more information on the lecture, exhibitions, or museum hours, call 865-215-8824 or visit the website at www.EastTNHistory.org.


SAFTA hosts readings at Bar Marley

The Sundress Reading Series is excited to welcome Charles Dodd White, Sybil Baker, and Randon Billings Noble for readings on Sunday, September 18, 2016 from 2 to 4 PM at Bar Marley (760 Stone St NW) in North Knoxville.

Charles Dodd White lives in East Tennessee. He is a recipient of the Chaffin Award for excellence in Appalachian Literature, a Jean Ritchie Fellowship from Lincoln Memorial University, and an individual artist’s grant from the North Carolina Arts Council. He is author of the novels, A Shelter of Others (2014), Lambs of Men (2010), and the story collection, Sinners of Sanction County (2011). He is also editor of the contemporary Appalachian story anthologies, Degrees of Elevation (2010) and Appalachia Now (2015). His work has appeared in Red Holler: Contemporary Appalachian Writing, Walk Till the Dogs Get Mean: Meditations on the Forbidden from Contemporary Appalachia, Appalachian Heritage, The Louisville Review, North Carolina Literary Review, The Rumpus, Tusculum Review and others. He is an Assistant Professor at Pellissippi State Community College in Knoxville, Tennessee where he chairs the James Agee Conference.

Sybil Baker’s most recent novel is Into This World. She is a UC Foundation Assistant Professor at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, and teaches at the Yale Writer’s Conference. Immigration Essays, partially funded by a Make Work Artist Grant, is forthcoming in from C&R Press. She is a 2017 recipient of an Individual Artist Grant by the Tennessee Arts Commission. She is Fiction Editor at Drunken Boat.

Randon Billings Noble is an essayist. Her work has appeared in the Modern Love column of The New York Times, The Georgia Review, The Rumpus, Brevity, Creative Nonfiction, Fourth Genre and elsewhere. A fellow at the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts and a resident at the Vermont Studio Center, she was named a 2013 Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation Creative Fellow to attend a residency at The Millay Colony for the Arts. Currently she is a nonfiction editor at r.kv.r.y quarterly, Reviews Editor at Tinderbox Poetry Journal, and a reviewer for The A.V. Club.

The Sundress Reading Series is free and open to the public.


Library sponsors author readings

Novelist Leah Stewart will read from her work at the University of Tennessee on Monday, September 19, 2016. The event is part of the university’s Writers in the Library reading series. The public is invited to this free reading at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of UT’s John C. Hodges Library.

Stewart is the author of five novels, most recently The New Neighbor, a darkly sophisticated novel about an old woman’s curiosity turned into a dangerous obsession as she becomes involved in her new neighbor’s complicated and cloaked life. The New York Times Book Review says of The New Neighbor, “Stewart never relaxes her tight focus on these complex characters.” People Magazine calls it “a chilling page-turner.”

Stewart is professor and area director of creative writing in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of Cincinnati. She has held visiting writer positions at the University of the South in Sewanee, Tennessee; Vanderbilt University; and Murray State University in Kentucky. In 2010, she was the recipient of an NEA Literature Fellowship and in 2014 the recipient of a Sachs Fund Prize.

Visit http://library.utk.edu/writers for a complete schedule of Writers in the Library readings for the 2016-2017 academic year.

Writers in the Library is sponsored by the UT Libraries and the Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund. For more information, contact Erin Elizabeth Smith, Jack E. Reese Writer-in-Residence at the UT Libraries, at esmith83@utk.edu.


Parsons is Writers Guild speaker

Noted poet Linda Parsons will speak at the Thursday, Sept. 1, 2016 meeting of the Knoxville Writers’ Guild. She will present her new and fourth poetry collection, “This Shaky Earth” (Texas Review Press, 2016), and discuss the process of preparing a collection.

The meeting is open to the public and will begin at 7 p.m. in Central United Methodist Church’s Fellowship Hall at 201 E. Third Ave. The event is at the same time as the first UT football game of the season, but you can click here to find a route that bypasses the traffic. Attendees should enter off the large parking lot behind the church. A $2 donation is welcome at the door with free and accessible parking available.

“‘This Shaky Earth’ straddles time, family divisions and legacies. It’s leavened with a hunger to understand the growing pains of childhood and to know that all will be well as we navigate this sometimes ‘shaky earth,’” Parsons said. “I’m excited to discuss the process and challenges of compiling and organizing a collection for publication.”

Parsons is a member of the East Tennessee Writers Hall of Fame. Her poems have appeared in journals such as The Georgia Review, Iowa Review, Prairie Schooner, Southern Poetry Review, Asheville Poetry Review, and Shenandoah and in numerous anthologies. Her play adaptation, “Macbeth Is the New Black,” co-written by Jayne Morgan, completed runs at Maryville College and Western Carolina University. In October, she will present the Henrietta Jenkins Memorial Homecoming reading at Carson Newman University.


KWG hosts playwright Lisa Soland

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. – Award-winning author and playwright Lisa Soland will speak on “What the Playwright Can Teach the Writer” at the Thursday, Aug. 4, 2016 meeting of the Knoxville Writers’ Guild.

The meeting is open to the public and will begin at 7 p.m. in Central United Methodist Church’s Fellowship Hall at 201 E. Third Ave. Attendees should enter off of the large parking lot behind the church. A $2 donation is welcome at the door with free and accessible parking available.

At this meeting, Soland will showcase the dramatist’s craft to help writers improve their work.

“I will share tips and tactics, articulate conflict, and reveal character through action,” Soland said. “Writer’s dialogue can be stronger, characters more credible, and dramatic conflict more riveting. This is a great opportunity to gather practical advice and help narratives leap off the page.”

Lisa Soland has more than 40 internationally published plays and four children’s books. She has produced and/or directed over 80 productions and play readings, 55 of them original. Ms. Soland teaches privately, in the theatre department of Maryville College, and throughout the U.S. Soland is currently writing a one-man play on the life of World War I hero, Sgt. Alvin York, scheduled to open in the fall of 2017 at York’s childhood home in Pall Mall, Tenn.

The Knoxville Writers’ Guild exists to facilitate a broad and inclusive community for area writers, provide a forum for information, support and sharing among writers, help members improve and market their writing skills and promote writing and creativity. Additional information about KWG can be found at www.KnoxvilleWritersGuild.org.


KWG offers memoir workshop

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. – The Knoxville Writers’ Guild (KWG) will offer an interactive, two-hour workshop, “Writing Your Story,” on Saturday, July 16, 2016 from 10 a.m. to noon at the Central United Methodist Church, 201 E. Third Avenue in Knoxville. Free and accessible parking is available.

Award-winning journalist, writer, and educator Bonny Millard will show participants how to turn personal stories into publishable narratives while considering the right vehicle: essay, profile, memoir or fiction. No previous writing or publishing experience is needed.

“As a journalist, one of my favorite assignments has been interviewing interesting people and writing their stories,” Millard said. “Those people’s stories have stuck with me through the years and remain as engaging now as they did then. I want to help others learn to find their stories and develop ways to get those stories down.”

To register for the workshop, visit http://knoxvillewritersguild.org/events/writing-your-stories-workshop or send a check to KWG Workshops, P.O. Box 10326, Knoxville, TN, 37939-0326. The workshop cost is $40. Members receive a 40 percent discount and student members receive a 50 percent discount.

About the Knoxville Writers’ Guild
The nonprofit Knoxville Writers’ Guild offers a broad and inclusive community for area writers and helps members improve and market their work. Meetings are at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month at Central United Methodist Church and are open to the public. Additional information about KWG can be found at www.KnoxvilleWritersGuild.org.


Knox Library Book Sale is June 25-28

Knox County Public Library’s 2016 Annual Used Book Sale will be held June 25–28, 2016 at the Jacob Building at Chilhowee Park in downtown Knoxville, Tennessee.

Thousands of beautiful used books will be on sale to benefit the Knox County Public Library. From Members Only Day on June 25 through Bag Sale Day on June 28, this year’s sale offers great book bargains for everyone.

Knoxville residents can support Friends of the Knox County Public Library in 2016 by registering a Kroger Plus Card and choosing Friends as the recipient.

Participants earn points for the library with every purchase that will be converted into dollars of support for Friends. Participants still receive Kroger Plus Card discounts just like before, and benefit the library at the same time.

Follow these easy steps to link your card to Friends: Register your card online—create an account, then enter your email, favorite store, and Kroger Plus Card number. At the bottom of your Account Summary, click Enroll under Community Rewards, and either enter our Kroger Non Profit number (65466) or just search for Friends of the Knox County Public Library.

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Author makes historic trek

Author Jerry Ellis will be speaking about his 900 mile walk along the Cherokee Trail of Tears as guest speaker for the Historic Ramsey House Annual Meeting to be held at the East Tennessee Historic Center, 601 S Gay Street on June 21, 2016 at 5:30pm. Ellis, a graduate of the University of Alabama, became, in 1989 the first person in the modern world to walk the Trail of Tears.

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Jerry Ellis

“I did the walk to honor the Cherokee and to raise awareness about Cherokee history,” said Ellis. “I sold all I owned to finance the life-altering, two month trek. I slept mostly in woods and fields along the Trail, though sometimes kind strangers gave me shelter and a meal for the night.”

Random House nominated Ellis’ resulting book, Walking the Trail, One Man’s Journey Along the Cherokee Trail of Tears, for a Pulitzer Prize and a National Book Award. It has been read by more than 600,000, quoted in Reader’s Digest, and went on display in 2011 at the National Teachers’ Hall of Fame.

A meet and greet and book signing will begin at 5:30 with supper and program to follow at 6:15.

Tickets are $20 for members of Ramsey House and $25 for non members. Reservations can be made at 865-546- 0745 or by email at judy@ramseyhouse.org.

 


Research skills workshop offered

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. – The Knoxville Writers’ Guild (KWG) will host a research workshop titled, “Smart Research Tactics for Writers”. It will be held on Saturday, June 4, 2016 from 10 a.m. to noon at Central United Methodist Church. The church is located at 201 E. Third Ave. in Knoxville. Accessible parking is available.

The workshop will be led by historical novelist, Pamela Schoenewaldt, and research librarian, Jamie Osborne, from the Knox County Public Library.

“Whatever your genre – fiction or non, journalism, memoir, poetry, or family history – this workshop will pay for itself many times over”, Osborne said. “We’ll show the wealth of material available through the Knox County Public Library, including the McClung Collection.”

Writers of any genre, any age, and any level of experience are welcome.
To register for the workshop, visit http://knoxvillewritersguild.org/events/smart-research-writers-workshop or send a check to KWG Workshops, P.O. Box 10326, Knoxville, TN, 37939-0326. Cost is $35 for KWG members, $40 for nonmembers, and $15 for students.

About the Knoxville Writers’ Guild

The Knoxville Writers’ Guild exists to facilitate a broad and inclusive community for area writers, provide a forum for information, support and sharing among writers, help members improve and market their writing skills and promote writing and creativity.

Additional information about KWG can be found at www.KnoxvilleWritersGuild.org.


Book explores nature of the universe

CELEBRATE KNOXVILLE – It’s National Star Wars Day, and Celebrate Knoxville spent a little time on the phone today with UCLA researcher and astrophysicist Dr. Jeff Zweerink to discuss his recent book, “Whose Afraid of the MultiVerse?” Written in easy-to-read style, with illustrations from popular culture including Star Wars movies, the book explores ideas about space, time, matter, and energy.

Zweerink

CK: Thanks for talking with us on National Star Wars Day, Dr. Zweerink!

JZ: Glad to do it. I didn’t realize that was today.

CK: Is most of your work analyzing data or do you actually get to do experiments with gamma rays?

JZ: About 40 percent of my time is spent on experiments. We’re currently building a balloon that (once we get the funding) we will send out to collect data.

CK: When you talk about The Big Bang in ‘Whose Afraid of the MultiVerse?’, why do you use the word ‘inflation’ and not ‘explosion’ to describe what happened?

JZ: It’s a scientific term to describe the expansion of the fabric of space.

CK: As a layperson, it makes me think that the universe took a breath, like lungs filling up. Doesn’t using the word ‘inflation’ imply that something was sucked in from somewhere else, and what would that substance be?

JZ: I can see what you mean by that. Scientists use this word to describe one possible (scenario) that is like a balloon with dots on it. When the fabric expands, the dots move apart.

CK: On page 14 of your book, you said ‘the only real controversial aspect of the level one model (of the universe) is its spacial extent, or size.’ Are there really scientists out there in California that think the universe has a finite size, like a box, or like the earth is sitting on the back of a tortoise (to use Native American mythology)?

JZ: You can think of the universe as flat, in three dimensions like a piece of paper, but there are other ways to think about it. In a closed model, like the one on page 11 of the book, the universe would be ball-shaped with closed geometry.

CK: In your introduction, you inform the reader that you are a scientist with a Christian world view. Do you think that God placed the planets in such a way that it models sub atomic particles and helps us understand the nature of the unseen?

JZ: I think that there are signs both in the way the universe has been presented and in what we know about quantum physics that reveals the designer, creator, God. Whether they are exact mirrors of each other, I can’t say.

CK: I love how you use illustrations from popular movies like Star Wars, The Matrix, and Back to the Future, to help people understand some of these interesting but complex scientific ideas. Have you ever seen the television series, Lost?

JZ: I have.

CK: Do you think (as an astrophysicist who is also a Christian) that the story is a good example of a shared consciousness, and that we, as believers, are co-creating Heaven, a shared consciousness, with God?

JZ: There are some serious (mainstream Christianity) theological issues with that point of view, especially about the soverignty of God. He doesn’t need our help.

CK: But we do co-create with Him when we pray, right? We make things happen that otherwise might not have happened unless we were involved?

JZ: Yes, we do. That’s an interesting point. Not certain that applies to Heaven, though. Would make some interesting further discussion. When I first became a scientist, I thought that science and faith were enemies. Now I have come to understand that revelations from both science and faith (Scriptural revelation) will inform the other and both will agree.

CK: In your book you said that “Scientists are aware that their equipment selects what data they measure.” How does that relate to changes made by the Observer in quantum physics?

JZ: That’s one of the philosophical questions discussed in the book–in having the point of view as the universe being designed by a Creator to support life, we ourselves are Observer and are working within the realm we’re working to describe. We can’t argue for a universe that does not support life, since we are here and we are alive.

CK: That’s the topic of a new book?

JZ: Yes, my new book is about Exoplanets, planets outside our solar system, exploring questions about the possibility of life out there.

CK: And if there is life out there, Jesus died for them too, and would not have to be born on their planet to (provide spiritual revelation) enlightenment?

JZ: If they are human. Jesus being born as human, the incarnation, is crucial.

CK: But what is human? Scripture says God created man from dirt. And any other planet out there would have dirt of some kind, right? Or are you saying in the case of life not being carbon-based…

JZ: Well now we’re talking about the same kinds of issues with the multiverse, where we have infinite possibilities in infinite time…

CK: And I love how in your book, you say that Marty McFly’s time line where he does not go back into the future still exists!

JZ: If the multiverse exists.

CK: And would you say that if the multiverse does exists, the life, death, resurrection of Christ is the only event that does happen without change, and is central to all other events, which could and would be free to happen any number of ways and still be meaningful?

JK: If the multiverse exists, that would have to be true. You know there is a group that meets in Knoxville that discusses these kinds of questions, and is open to all people interested in science, regardless of world view.

CK: I saw that. We actually have several science-related Meet Up groups in Knoxville. And of course Knoxville is a college town with the University of Tennessee, so there are plenty of opportunities to get involved with scientific studies there too. So fun! For my last question, how can people get a copy of “Whose Afraid of the MultiVerse?” or find out more about your work?

JZ: Send them to the web site, Reasons.org.


Writers meeting features improv

The art and science of improv will take center stage at the Thursday, April 7, 2016 meeting of the Knoxville Writers Guild. Noted improv performers James Newport, founder of the Gatlinburg Improv Festival, and Paul Simmons, a founder of Einstein Simplified improv troupe, will speak.

The meeting will be in the fellowship hall of Central United Methodist Church, 201 3rd Avenue in Knoxville, which is handicapped accessible The meeting is open to the public. A $2 donation is suggested.

Improv, according to the Einstein Simplified website, is comedy in which “one or more performers present unscripted material, such as games, scenes, monologues, musical montages, what-have-you, before an audience; usually basing this material on suggestions received from the audience. This is not sketch comedy (i.e. Mad TV, Saturday Night Live or The Carol Burnett Show). Nor is it stand-up comedy.”

Newport has nearly 30 years of improv performing, directing, and teaching experience. Before moving to the Knoxville area, Newport performed with SAK Theatre and Comedy Lab, in in Orlando, FL, where he was performer, teacher, and then SAK’s Artistic and Managing Director.

Simmons was a co-founder of Einstein Simplified and has taught many courses in comedy and improv over the years. Einstein Simplified has been entertaining Knoxville, TN and the surrounding area since 1994. The troupe has performed more than 1100 shows of comedy improv. It now performs at 8:15 p.m. every Tuesday at Scruffy City Hall on Market Square.


KWG hosts local publisher

Knoxville Writers’ Guild will host local publishing marketer Caitlin Hamilton Summie at their March 3, 2016 program.

The event, which will be open to the public, will begin at 7 p.m. in Central United Methodist Church’s Fellowship Hall at 201 E. Third Ave. Attendees should enter off of the large parking lot behind the church. A $2 donation is requested at the door. The building is handicapped accessible.

Hamilton Summie is a book marketer and publicist who works with small and large house authors, as well as the self-published, to promote their works. She is the former marketing director of MacMurray & Beck, BlueHen Books/Penguin Putnam, and founded her own firm in 2003. In addition to marketing, she has also published both short stories and poems, and was an independent bookseller.

“I’m excited to discuss publicity basics, the importance of marketing for authors, and take questions from local writers,” Caitlin said. “I want writers to know what it takes to make our voices heard in 2016!”

The Knoxville Writers’ Guild exists to facilitate a broad and inclusive community for area writers, provide a forum for information, support and sharing among writers, help members improve and market their writing skills and promote writing and creativity.


Be debt-free in 2016

If taking control of your money is one of your goals this year, you need to come up with a plan that’ll outlast your Valentine’s Day roses, says financial expert Dave Ramsey.  To make that happen, he says, you must begin with a plan to pay off your debts, beginning with the smallest one. This frees up more of your money to pay off even more debts, and you create a snowball effect. This changes you from being a person who buys what they can’t afford into a person who can afford to buy what they really want, in cash.

  1. Where do I want to be financially at this time next year?

Take a look into the future. Imagine yourself better off, money-wise, by 2017. What does that look like for you? Depending on where you are now and just how gazelle intense you want to get, you might have made a dent in your consumer debt, or you might be coasting through a fully funded retirement plan and gearing up to finally pay off your house. You’ll set yourself up for success by having a solid, definable goal in mind with a timeline in place to reach it.

Use an outline to help you break down your goals into tiny, bite-size pieces. Now pull out your calendar and start writing down your goals!

  1. How can I kick-start dumping debt for good?

The key to freeing yourself from debt is making a budget and sticking to it so you can see where your money is going. Try it out for about three months to get the hang of it and to see some patterns in your spending. Once you do, it’s pretty simple, and it can actually be fun! This is a habit worth starting.

Once you have a budget, you have to change your perspective. You have to hate being in debt. That’ll make you pay your bills off fast. That also means you might have to delay some things you really, really want. But if you slog through the painful stuff now, you’ll reap the rewards later.

  1. What are my biggest financial obstacles?

Change isn’t easy. If it were, everyone would be debt-free. That’s why you need to identify what’s held you back in the past and attack those obstacles head on. Do you spend money you don’t have? Is your accountability partner MIA? Does an endless stream of emergencies drag you back into debt as soon as you’ve gotten out?

Identify your weaknesses or stumbling blocks so you can protect yourself from them when you’re feeling tempted or backed into a corner. Where are you spending your time? Are your priorities lining up with your goals?

So, now that you’ve faced the hard questions, are you ready to make 2016 your best year yet? With the right level of determination and a little bit of planning, you can be debt-free.

For more ideas on how to get control of your finances, visit DaveRamsey.com.

 


KWG offers slam poetry workshop

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. – Hip-hop spoken word artist and six-time nationally ranked slam poet Black Atticus will teach the “Write or Die” workshop with slam-poetry techniques from 1 to 3 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 27, 2016 at Central United Methodist Church’s Fellowship Hall at 201 E. Third Ave.

Sponsored by the Knoxville Writers’ Guild, cost is $35 for KWG members and $40 for nonmembers. The building is handicapped accessible.

Atticus will walk attendees through the thought process and techniques he’s used when coaching other poetry slam teams. These will involve his newest book and CD, “Park City Pedestrian”.

“I’m excited to help aspiring poets enhance their basic understanding of one’s audience, as well as use of one’s voice,” Atticus said. “My workshop is based around one sole principal: we can’t begin to heal from our troubles or approach our problems if we can’t even talk about them. Before we get to that stage, we have to be able to at least write about it first.”

To register for the workshop, visit http://knoxvillewritersguild.org/events/write-or-die-slam-poetry-workshop or send your check to KWG Workshops, P.O. Box 10326, Knoxville, TN, 37939-0326.

For more information about Atticus, visit his website: http://blackatticus.wix.com/officialhomepage#!biography

About the Knoxville Writers’ Guild

The Knoxville Writers’ Guild exists to facilitate a broad and inclusive community for area writers, provide a forum for information, support and sharing among writers, help members improve and market their writing skills and promote writing and creativity. Additional information about KWG can be found at www.KnoxvilleWritersGuild.org.

 


Tribute scheduled for Dolly Parton

KNOXVILLE, TN – Dolly Parton is turning 70 years young, and Knox County’s Chapter of the Imagination Library is throwing a birthday party in her honor on January 19, 2016 at 7:00 p.m. at the Bijou Theatre in downtown Knoxville.

The public is invited to celebrate East Tennessee’s favorite daughter with a Tribute Show featuring the award-winning story “A Boy and His Dolly” by Mark Lamb and local musicians singing her most popular songs on the U.S. Cellular Stage at the Bijou Theatre, where she got her start more than 50 years ago.

Featured musicians are Robin Ella Bailey, Nathan Barrett, Michael Crawley, Mischa Goldman, Christina Horn, Kelle Jolly, Laith Keilany, Ben Maney, Jodie Manross, Sean McCollough, and Sarah Firkle.

Tickets are $25.00 (plus applicable service fees) and proceeds benefit the Knox County chapter of Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library.

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Knoxville Writers host holiday meetup

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. – Members of the Knoxville Writers’ Guild writing groups will share their works and hold a mix and mingle potluck for the 2015 December monthly program. Both current members and those simply curious about joining the guild are encouraged to attend and to bring a covered dish.

The event, which will be open to the public, will begin at 7 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 3 at Central United Methodist Church’s Fellowship Hall, 201 E. Third Ave. CUMC is a new venue for monthly KWG programs, and attendees should enter off of the large parking lot behind the church. A $2 donation is requested at the door. The building is handicapped accessible.

About the new venue, KWG president, Donna Kapa, said, “The church can host our general meetings as well as our workshops in a variety of comfortable, hospitable and affordable rooms.”

More than 15 writing groups are currently part of the KWG, with genres including poetry, playwriting, literary fiction, crime and mystery, sci-fi/fantasy, prompt writing and creative non-fiction. The guild also features two groups specifically designed for teen writers. A representative from most groups will be available, and writers are encouraged to bring copies of their books to sell in anticipation of the holidays. Sales tables will also be provided for those KWG members not currently part of one of the groups.

The Knoxville Writers’ Guild exists to facilitate a broad and inclusive community for area writers, provide a forum for information, support and sharing among writers, help members improve and market their writing skills and promote writing and creativity. Additional information about KWG can be found at www.KnoxvilleWritersGuild.org.


McClung Museum hosts holiday sale

Knoxville’s McClung Museum will hold its annual sale Nov. 3–10, 2015. Shoppers will find savings on fall and holiday items, books, and toys. New items from local artists including handmade wooden pens, unique jewelry, prints and pottery also will be available.

Proceeds from the sale support the McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture’s educational programs, which reach thousands of university and K-12 students in the East Tennessee region each year.

Sale items will be available while supplies last. Some exclusions will apply.

The McClung Museum and the Museum Store are open 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 1–5 p.m. Sundays.

Complimentary parking is available in front of the museum on Circle Park Drive on a first come, first served basis.

Free public transportation to the museum is available via the Knoxville Trolley Vol Line.


Fanboy Expo comes to Knoxville

Fanboy Expo Knoxville takes place at The Knoxville Convention Center Oct. 16-18, 2015.

“Fanboy Expo is always one of our favorite events of the year,” said Mary Bogert, general manager at the Knoxville Convention Center. “Every year, Fanboy continues to offer exciting pop culture icons and celebrities to regional audiences, and this year’s lineup doesn’t disappoint.”

Cult classic lovers and comic book aficionados will travel to Knoxville for the chance to meet their favorite celebrity actors and comic illustrators. The expo also will feature vendors selling comic books, toys and other fandom paraphernalia.

Celebrities will be available throughout the weekend to answer questions from fans, pose for pictures and sign photos and memorabilia. Numerous comic book industry professionals and tattoo artists are also scheduled to attend.

Attendees will have the opportunity to be judged on cosplay, or costume play, of their favorite comic book, television series, movie or video game. Contestants’ costumes must be at least partially handmade and will be judged by professional or celebrity judges on Saturday, Oct. 17, at 1 p.m.

Winners will be selected in different categories based on cosplay experience, ranging from beginner to professional levels. Children’s and group costuming categories are included. An overall male and female winner also will be selected.

The exhibition booths with comic books, movie props and other fandom paraphernalia will be open from 4 to 9 p.m. Friday; 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday; and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. General admission tickets are available online and for purchase at the door.


KWG names 2015 writing awards

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. – The Knoxville Writers’ Guild is excited to announce the winners of its annual writing contest. Out of the many entries received, 14 writers were selected for recognition in the 2015 Knoxville Writers’ Guild Contests. Winners for each category are listed below:

Leslie Garrett Award for Literary Fiction
First Place: “An Encounter with Yesterday” by Susan Lindsley
Second Place: “An Immodest Proposal” by Jane Sasser
Third Place: “Living in Shitsville” by Amber Hart

Genre Fiction
First Place: “The Old Lady and the Coyotes” by Susan Lindsley

Novel Excerpt
First Place: “Return to Taylor’s Crossing” by Janie Dempsey Watts
Second Place: “Prosperity” by Gerhard Schneibel
Third Place: “Our Little Domestic Heroine” by Carol J. Luther

Creative Nonfiction
First Place: “Hangin’ at the Dump” by Linda Myers
Second Place: “Accommodation” by Stephanie Levy
Third Place: “At the Clinic” by Diane Montgomery

Libba Moore Gray Award for Poetry
First Place: “Learning to Mother” by Connie Jordan Green
Second Place: “Flesh and Blood” by Carlos Andres Gomez
Third Place: “Migraineur” by Jane Sasser

Young Writers
First Place: “At the End of Tornado Alley” by Delaney Thurston

KWG congratulates the winners and expresses its thanks to all who participated. For more information about future contests and events, visit www.knoxvillewritersguild.org.

 


Free presentation on Jackie Kennedy

The East Tennessee Historical Society and the Bijou Theatre in Knoxville will commemorate the 55th anniversary of the John and Jackie Kennedy’s 1960 presidential campaign visit on Monday, September 21, 2015 at 6:30 p.m.

Tina Santi Flaherty, author of What Jackie Taught Us: Lessons From the Remarkable Life of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, will give a presentation on the public and private life of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis–her glamour and style, men and marriages, motherhood, vision, and courage.

The Tennessee Archive of Moving Image and Sound will also show vintage film clips of past presidential visits to Knoxville.

The event is free and open to the public.

TinaSantiFlaherty

Tina Santi Flaherty is the author of What Jackie Taught Us: Lessons from the Remarkable Life of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis. The Memphis native arrived in New York with $100 in her pocket and not knowing a soul and went on to become the first female corporate vice president of three of America’s largest corporations: Colgate-Palmolive, Gray Advertising, and GTE (now Verizon), earning her a Business Week recognition as One of America’s top corporate executives.

Her many awards and honors include an honorary doctorate from St. John’s University, an Equal People Award from the United Nations Decade for Women, and an Extraordinary Woman of Achievement Award from the National Conference of Christians and Jews.

Ms. Flaherty’s books will be available for purchase and signing following the lecture.


Democrat Women support education

KNOXVILLE, TN – When school starts back for the 2015-2016 term, students at Maynard Elementary School can expect a real treat. Free books are on the way.

Due to a program launched by Martha Rose Woodward, a retired school teacher, Betty Reddick, Democratic Women of Knoxville’s leader and Sid Gwyn, local businessman, students in grades 2nd through 5th will be given free books each to take home and keep.

More books will be given to the students during this school year in hopes of increasing reading practice. Democratic Women of Knoxville, a club that recently celebrated its 25th year, sponsors programs and events that support education.

As a long-time member of Friends of the Library, Woodward said that she negotiated with the group in order to purchase books left over from their big sale held in May at a discounted rate.

“After Betty’s group paid for the books, I selected the ones I knew would coordinate with the skills being taught in each grade. After I boxed up the books, we needed a place to store them. Betty was going to rent a storage unit, but my good friend, Sid Gwyn, had an empty house he offered as space for storage until time for school to begin,” said Woodward.

The books were sorted according to grade levels and placed in bags made by the members of the club from tee-shirts.

Contact was made with the principal of Maynard Elementary School, Kim Wilburn-Collum, who was thrilled for her students to have the opportunity to be given free books. A date was set and free books will be going home with the lucky students soon.

“We wanted a program like this one,” said Wilburn-Collum. “We just didn’t know how it might happen. This fits the needs of our students.”

Anyone in the community who would like to make a donation for the program may contact Betty Reddick via e mail at Jsrdk@aol.com.

Democratic Women of Knoxville meets on the first Monday of the month at 12:00 noon at the Knoxville-Oak Ridge Area Central Labor Council, located at 1522 Bill Williams Drive. Membership is open.

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Democratic Women of Knoxville’s Club made no-sew bags using old tee-shirts to hold the free books being distributed at Maynard Elementary School in Knoxville. Photo by M. Woodward.


Editor offers fiction writing workshop

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. – Hugo and Stoker Award-nominated editor and publisher Jason Sizemore will speak at the Thursday, Aug. 6, 2015 program of the Knoxville Writers’ Guild. The event, which will be open to the public, will begin at 7 p.m. at the Laurel Theater, at the corner of Laurel Avenue and 16th Streets (in Fort Sanders). A $2 donation is requested at the door. The building is handicapped accessible. Additional parking is available at Redeemer Church of Knoxville, 1642 Highland Ave.

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Jason Sizemore is the owner/operator of Apex Publications, a small press that focuses on science fiction, fantasy and horror. Its “Apex Magazine” has been nominated for the Hugo Award three times. He is the featured speaker August 6, 2015 at the Knoxville Writers Guild August monthly program and will offer a hands-on writing workshop on Saturday, August 8, 2015. Registration for the workshop is available at www.KnoxvilleWritersGuild.org.

In addition, he’ll read a chapter from his latest book, “For Exposure: The Life and Times of a Small Press Publisher” (Apex 2015).

“I will read a condensed version of the chapter that relates slush pile facts and a couple of the more worrisome submissions I’ve received,” he said. “The authors will find it informative and hopefully entertaining.”

The book follows his unconventional professional path as it winds through a tiny, overheated Baptist church deep within the coal fields of Appalachia, Kentucky, past a busted printer and a self-serving boss that triggered an early mid-life crisis and the epiphany that he should open a magazine spreading the gospel of science fiction to the masses, all the way to WorldCon 2012 and his first Hugo Awards ceremony. For more information, visit www.jason-sizemore.com or www.apexbookcompany.com. Copies of “For Exposure” and his collection, “Ireedemable” (Seventh Star Press 2014), will be available for purchase at the program.

Sizemore also is slated to lead a workshop Saturday, Aug. 8 titled, “Writing Science Fiction and Fantasy: Liftoff!”The event is scheduled for 12:45-3:45, at  Central United Methodist Church, 201 3rd Avenue, Knoxville. (This is one block off Broadway in the 4th and Gill neighborhood.)

About the Knoxville Writers’ Guild

The Knoxville Writers’ Guild exists to facilitate a broad and inclusive community for area writers, provide a forum for information, support and sharing among writers, help members improve and market their writing skills and promote writing and creativity.

 


KWG welcomes Jason Sizemore

Thinking about dipping your pen into the genre writing pool? The Knoxville Writers Guild welcomes Jason Sizemore, three-time Hugo Award nominee and editor-in-chief of Apex Publications, as featured speaker on August 6, 2015, at 7 p.m. at the Laurel Theater.

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The Knoxville Writers Guild welcomes Jason Sizemore, three-time Hugo Award nominee and editor-in-chief of Apex Publications, as featured speaker on August 6, 2015, at 7 p.m. at the Laurel Theater.

Apex Magazine is an online prose and poetry magazine of science fiction, fantasy, horror, and mash-ups of all three. Each month the magazine brings a mix of originals and reprints, interspersed with interviews and nonfiction.

Apex Magazine received a Best Semiprozine Hugo nomination in 2012, 2013, and 2014. The publication placed two stories in the 2010 Nebula Award category of Best Short Story, and Apex stories won the category in 2014 (“If You Were a Dinosaur My Love” by Rachel Swirsky) and again in 2015 (“Jackalope Wives” by Ursula Vernon. Dozen of stories have been selected for the annual Year’s Best anthologies over the past five years.

Attendees of the speaking engagement will be given an overview of genre market information, guidelines, and resources to help writers find homes for science fiction and fantasy manuscripts.

On Saturday, August 8, Sizemore’s follow-up seminar will cover more in depth which publishers to target, what to avoid in cover letters, tips on surviving the slush pile, popular agents, and a handful of insider tips from an experienced editor that might help give you a slight edge over other writers.

Both novel and short fiction markets will be covered in the seminar and cost is $40 to attend.

To register for the workshop, Email jason@apexbookcompany.com.

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Captain America at Knoxville Zoo

Knoxville, Tenn. –Marvel Comics favorites Captain America and Spider-Man are coming to Knoxville Zoo for a special appearance at Superhero Saturday on June 20, 2015 from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m.

Kids ages 12 and under who come dressed as their favorite super hero get free admission with a paid adult admission.

captainamerica

Superpowers are not required to meet Marvel’s Spider-Man and Captain America at the Knoxville Zoo on June 20, 2015. Fans of all ages are invited to come by for a personal introduction and to pose for photos. Other special activities include the “Superhero Training Academy”, where kids can learn how to use their Hulk-like strength to show some muscle or practice using Superman’s heat vision for heroic rescues.

One free child’s admission offered per adult paid admission, please, and this offer cannot be combined with any other coupon or discount. Valid on Saturday, June 20, 2015 only.

Knoxville Zoo is Knoxville’s largest year-round attraction and is located off exit 392 from Interstate 40.

For more information, please call 865.637.5331 ext. 300.


Burke to speak to writers guild

KNOXVILLE, TN – On Thursday, June 4, 2015, the monthly meeting of the Knoxville Writers’ Guild will feature novelist and screenwriter Shannon Burke.

ShannonBurke

Shannon Burke will read from his newest book, “Into the Savage Country” (Pantheon, February, 2015) at this event that is open to the public.

The event is 7 p.m. at the Laurel Theater, at the corner of Laurel Avenue and 16th Streets (in Fort Sanders). A $2 donation is requested at the door. The building is handicapped accessible. Additional parking is available at Redeemer Church of Knoxville, 1642 Highland Ave.

“Into the Savage Country” is a historical adventure novel that mostly takes place on a trapping brigade in the 1820s. It follows Burke’s successful first novels: “Safelight” (Random House 2005) and “Black Flies” (Soft Skull Press 2008) a New York Times Notable Book and a finalist for the Believer Book Award.


Book sale benefits library programs

Knox County Public Library will once again host their summer book sale to benefit library programs this weekend.

The sale is from Friday, May 29, 2015 through Monday, June 1, at Bearden High School, 8352 Kingston Pike.

Thousands of beautiful used books will be available for sale, and proceeds from the sale benefit Summer Library Clubs and other programs at Knox County Public Library.

Revenues from volunteer-operated book sales combine with membership dues and donations to fund library enhancements that would not be available otherwise.

In 2015 Friends will contribute over $50,000 to the Knox County Public Library System, providing support for projects including Summer Library Club incentives, Zoomobile visits to branches, and sponsorship and volunteers for the Children’s Festival of Reading.


Novelist to speak to writing group

KNOXVILLE – Bestselling novelist Pamela Schoenewaldt will launch her third novel, “Under the Same Blue Sky,” at the next Knoxville Writers’ Guild program, Thursday, May 7, 2015, at 7 p.m.

The event, which will be open to the public, will be held at the Laurel Theater, at the corner of Laurel Avenue and 16th Streets (in Fort Sanders).

pamschoenewaldt

Novelist Pam Schoenewaldt is scheduled to speak to the Knoxville Writers Guild May 7, 2015, at 7 p.m. at the Laurel Theater in downtown Knoxville. Photo submitted.

A $2 donation is requested at the door. The building is handicapped accessible. Additional parking is available at Redeemer Church of Knoxville, 1642 Highland Ave.

Schoenewaldt’s “Under the Same Blue Sky” is set to be released Tuesday, May 5 by Harper Collins. The historical novel is set in a German-American community during World War I.

Schoenewaldt is also the author of “When We Were Strangers” (HarperCollins 2011) and “Swimming in the Moon” (William Morrow Paperbacks 2013). The book will be available for purchase at the program, courtesy of Union Ave Books.

 


Poets featured at Knoxville Writers Guild

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. – In celebration of National Poetry Month, the Knoxville Writers’ Guild will feature award-winning poets Connie Jordan Green and Art Stewart during its April 2015 program.

The event, which will be open to the public, will begin at 7 p.m., Thursday, April 2 at the Laurel Theater, at the corner of Laurel Avenue and 16th Streets (in Fort Sanders). A $2 donation is requested at the door. The building is handicapped accessible. Additional parking is available at Redeemer Church of Knoxville, 1642 Highland Ave.

Stewart and Green both have been recognized by the East Tennessee Writers Hall of Fame. He is a 2013 inductee into the hall of fame, and she has received a Lifetime Achievement Award.

Books from both poets will be available for purchase at the program.


KWG announces winners

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (Feb. 17, 2015) – The Knoxville Writers’ Guild is excited to announce the winners of its annual writing contest.

Winners for each category are listed below:

Leslie Garrett Award for Literary Fiction
First Place: “A Family Meeting” by Phyllis Gobbell
Second Place: “The Clam” by Kirsten Rudberg
Third Place: “Choked” by Cathy Kodra

SciFi/Fantasy
First Place: “Metaphor Man – Chapter 2” by David Booker

Crime/Mystery
First Place: “Elsie” by Bob Godwin

Romance
First Place: “A Place for Lovers” by Patricia Hope

Novel Excerpt
First Place: “Maranatha Road” by Heather Bell Adams
Second Place: “Hold String and Fly” by Heather Bell Adams
Third Place: “The Hungry Years” by Connie Green

Creative Nonfiction
First Place: “Weighing Up the Risks” by Pauline Mary Curley

Libba Moore Gray Award for Poetry
First Place: “Carbon Monoxide” by Embley Veronica Noechel
Second Place: “Three Poems: ‘November 1862,’ ‘Three Men,’ and ‘An American Painting'” by John Mannone
Third Place: “Backwater Blues” by Faith Gomez

Young Writers’ Poetry Prize
First Place: “Easy Does It,” “Paper Doll” and “Space Traveler” by Jessica Moore
Second Place: “Entombed,” “Makeshift” and “To Whom It May Concern” by Elizabeth Wilson

Young Writers’ Fiction Prize
First Place: “Big Jim’s Antiques” by Abby Douglas

One Act Play
First Place: “Still Waters” by Mark McGinley

KWG congratulates the winners and expresses its thanks to all who participated. For more information about future contests and events, visit www.knoxvillewritersguild.org.


Screenwriter speaks to Knoxville writers

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. – Novelist and screenwriter Shannon Burke will read from his newest book, “Into the Savage Country,” at the March 2015 program of the Knoxville Writers’ Guild.

Shannon Burke

Shannon Burke will speak to the Knoxville Writers Guild beginning at 7 p.m., Thursday, March 5, 2015 at the Laurel Theater, at the corner of Laurel Avenue and 16th Streets (in Fort Sanders). A $2 donation is requested at the door. The building is handicapped accessible. Additional parking is available at Redeemer Church of Knoxville, 1642 Highland Ave. The event is open to the public.

“Into the Savage Country” is a historical adventure novel that mostly takes place on a trapping brigade in the 1820s. The novel begins as the protagonist – a young man named William Wyeth – starts west on a trapping brigade. The character makes friends, falls in love, chases buffalos and becomes involved in a struggle where the future of the country hangs in the balance.

“I grew up reading books like ‘Kidnapped,’ ‘Treasure Island,’ ‘White Fang’ and ‘The Count of Monte Cristo,’ and my intent was to write a book in that vein,” Burke said.

Burke’s previous novels were well-received and have been translated into several languages. “Safelight” (Random House 2005) was on the Kirkus and Publishers Weekly end of the year lists. “Black Flies” (Soft Skull Press 2008) was on numerous end of the year lists, was a New York Times Notable Book, a finalist for the Believer Book Award, on the Impac Dublin Literary Award Long List and runner up for the Grand Prix de Littérature Policière. He has worked on various films, including work on the script for the film “Syriana.”

About the Knoxville Writers’ Guild

The Knoxville Writers’ Guild exists to facilitate a broad and inclusive community for area writers, provide a forum for information, support and sharing among writers, help members improve and market their writing skills and promote writing and creativity. Additional information about KWG can be found at www.KnoxvilleWritersGuild.org.


A1LabArts promotes book sharing

KNOXVILLE – A1LabArts is hosting a Little Free Library Workshop on Saturday, February 21, 2015 from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. at the Center for Creative Minds, 23 Emory Place, in Knoxville.

For $50 per box, participants can create a Little Free Library to place in their neighborhood. What is a Little Free Library? It’s a “take a book, return a book” gathering place where neighbors share their favorite literature and stories.

Participants will be provided with all of the supplies necessary to assemble a box and instructions on how to install the box in their neighborhood. Groups are encouraged to participate. Email Donna at donnamoore32@mac.com to register.

A1LabArts is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization founded in 1995 by a group of local artists. It is dedicated to multi-disciplinary and experimental exploration of contemporary art issues in all media.


Great Cake Bake is Feb 28

This year’s Great Cake Bake to benefit the Dolly Parton Imagination Library of Knox County will take place on February 28, 2015, from noon to 5 p.m. at the Tennessee Terrace Level of Neyland Stadium.

Cake decorators, sugar enthusiasts, and artists pull out all the stops to create a sugary vision so that cake lovers come out to see and buy these sweet confections.

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Each competition entry is $15, which sponsors one child to receive books for a year;
Tickets are $10 (children 12 and under are free)

Entry Deadline is February 22, 2015.

For more information, visit knoxlib.org.


Blount Mansion sponsors History Suppers

The Blount Mansion Association is pleased to present the first annual History Suppers Events for 2015. These events will feature historians and authors speaking about topics related to Blount Mansion and Knoxville’s history. Supper is included at these events and a cash bar will be available. Costs: $65 per person per event.

February 3, 2015 – 6pm
Belle Boyd, Confederate Spy
Location: Boyd’s Jig and Reel
101 S Central St, Knoxville, TN 37902

Belle Boyd, a spy for the Confederacy, stayed in Knoxville at the Blount Mansion with her relatives during the Civil War. Learn more about the woman, her life and times, and Knoxville during the Civil War at Boyd’s Jig and Reel in the Old City.

RSVP By January 30, 2015 – spaces are limited.

March 23, 2015-6 p.m.
John Bell Hood and the Civil War in Tennessee
Location: The Grill at Highland’s Row
4705 Old Kingston Pike, Knoxville, TN 37919

History Press, Inc. reviews the content of Knight’s Hood’s Tennessee Campaign by saying of the battles: “The Tennessee Campaign of November and December 1864 was the Southern Confederacy’s last significant offensive operation of the Civil War. General John Bell Hood of the Confederate Army of Tennessee attempted to capture Nashville, the final realistic chance for a battlefield victory against the Northern juggernaut. Hood’s former West Point instructor, Major General George Henry Thomas, led the Union force, fighting those who doubted him in his own army as well as Hood’s Confederates. Through the bloody, horrific battles at Spring Hill, Franklin and Nashville and a freezing retreat to the Tennessee River, Hood ultimately failed. Civil War historian James R. Knight chronicles the Confederacy’s last real hope at victory and its bitter

Cost is $65 per person per event.

Please RSVP by calling Blount Mansion at (865) 525-2375.


KWG announces 2015 board members

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. – The Knoxville Writers’ Guild is excited to announce its 2015 Board of Directors, which will include several new faces as well as experienced board members.

Sara Keller and Kara McLain will continue to serve on the board. Keller has served since 2012 as the guild’s treasurer and will fill that office once again in 2015. McLain has been a board member and secretary since 2013 and will continue as secretary in the upcoming year. Robert Beasley, who moderates the guild’s fiction writing group based out of Maryville, will serve another year on the board. Finally, 2013-14 KWG president, Erin (Atchley) Rowland, was re-elected to the board. Rowland has been on the board since 2011.

“I feel we now have a board that is going to be absolutely dynamic in 2015. Look for a strong return of workshops and KWG presence in the Knoxville community, as well as better communication with members,” Rowland said about the 2015 board.

Newly elected board members include: Melanie Hutsell, Betty Southworth, Debra Dylan, Donna Kapa, Kelly Norrell, Doug Romig and Robert Vogel. Each of these individuals will begin their three-year term on Jan. 1, 2015.

Additional information about KWG and its members can be found at www.knoxvillewritersguild.org.


TN Theatre celebrates milestone

In 2015, the Tennessee Theatre will celebrate a decade since it received new life through a $28 million restoration. The community is invited to a free grand reopening celebration Wednesday, Jan. 14, from 7-9 p.m., to mark the 10th anniversary milestone.

The anniversary celebration at the downtown Tennessee Theatre will include refreshments, a free performance on the Mighty Wurlitzer organ and backstage tours guided by theater historians.

Tours are limited to 75 people per tour and will be filled on a first-come, first-served basis, so arrive early to reserve a spot for 7:15, 7:45 or 8:15 p.m.

The Historic Tennessee Theatre Foundation also will unveil a 228-page coffee table book by Jack Neely entitled “The Tennessee Theatre: A Grand Entertainment Palace.”

Neely researched for the better part of a year to write the book and interviewed theater historians and living contributors to the restoration campaign. The book also contains more than 350 images spanning more than a century, including historic photographs, newspaper advertisements, architectural drawings, performers on stage at the Tennessee, movie and show posters, and more.

The Tennessee Theatre is the Official State Theatre of Tennessee and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

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Keep the magic of the season

by Dave Ramsey, Contributing Writer. It’s easy to overdo Christmas for the sake of others. But when we’re exhausted and stressed, we miss out on the magic of the season. This year, bring back your Christmas magic. And don’t let these five simple mistakes cost you any more time, money or meaning.

1. Focusing on the External
If you can’t be content until your house is Martha Stewart-perfect and your menu is Barefoot Contessa-worthy, you may need some perspective. Christmas is not about buying and serving the finest of everything.

It’s about faith, generosity and family. So if you want to deck the halls of your home for the holidays (and you can afford it), go right ahead. But give your full attention to what matters most.

Everything else is just decoration.

2. Buying Gifts Without Meaning
Choosing a gift for your Dad is impossible. Every year, you play the what-do-you-want game for weeks, until you finally give up and grab the first World’s Greatest Grandpa sweatshirt you see.

You both know you’re wasting your money, but you have to buy him something! This year, give him an experience he’ll actually remember.

It can be as simple as a round of golf for him and his buddies or donating to his favorite charity. Just show him that you took the time to remember him. That’s the best gift you can give.

3. Forgetting to Stop and Rest
You wouldn’t think of working during your summer vacation, but you hardly sit down during your winter break! What gives?

Okay, there’s a lot to do. But you’ll get it done—you always do. And once you take a day or so to rejuvenate and relax, you may actually be more productive with the rest of your time off.

Block off a few days just for you. Don’t buy anything for anyone or make a mental grocery list. Just cozy up on the couch and read or head to the spa for a massage. Think of it as a mini Christmas present to yourself.

4. Catering to Your Kids
Your pre-teen has been begging for the latest gaming console for months. You can’t afford it, but you buy it anyway. Then you feel guilty for not spending $400 on all your kids.

We’ve got a better idea. Once you and your spouse settle on a reasonable budget, sit down as a family and lay down some realistic gift guidelines.

If your son won’t give up on the Xbox and it doesn’t fit in the budget, give him a few options. He can either have one gift card for a percentage of the price, or he can have several gifts to open Christmas morning. He may decide his old game system works just fine.

5. Not Saving for Post-Holiday Sales
Retailers spend tons of money promoting their Christmas merchandise. But as soon as December 26th rolls around, they want it off the shelves—fast. And they’re willing to discount accordingly.

Instead of spending every last dime on gifts, remember to reserve some cash for the Holy Grail of Christmas sales. And only buy items you will absolutely use again next year, like bulk wrapping paper, gift bags, tissue paper and spools of ribbon.

When you stock up on staples now, you put money in your pocket later.

Don’t overspend or overwork yourself to extremes this season. Do what you can, and let everything else go. Trade in your holiday mistakes for a more magical, meaningful season.

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Knoxville calendars now on sale

While making your New Year’s plans, make sure you plan to pick up a 2015 Knoxville Remembered calendar to keep you on track for all your appointments. This year’s photos include views of Chilhowee Park, the construction of the Kress Building, the Airplane Filling Station and many faces of Knoxville past. All photos used are from the Calvin McClung Historical Collection’s Digital Collection.

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The production and distribution of Knoxville Remembered calendars is made possible through partnerships with the East Tennessee Historical Society and the Friends of the Knox County Public Library.

Calendars are $15 and are available at select locations. Proceeds benefit the Knox County Public Library Staff Association. For large orders or to order by phone, call Casey Fox at 215-8713.

Calendar sale locations:
East Tennessee History Center Gift Shop
The Disc Exchange
Friends of the Library Branch Sales
Mast General Store
Pratt’s Country Market
Rala
Raven Records & Rarities
Rothrock Used Book Store (in Lawson McGhee Library)
Union Avenue Books

For large orders or to order by phone, call Casey Fox at 865-215-8713.


Knoxville Writers Guild invite new members

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. – Members of the Knoxville Writers’ Guild writing groups will share their works and hold a mix and mingle potluck for December’s monthly program. The event, which will be open to the public, will begin at 7 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 4, 2014 at the Laurel Theater, at the corner of Laurel Avenue and 16th Streets (in Fort Sanders).

Both current members and those simply curious about joining the guild are encouraged to attend and to bring a covered dish. A $2 donation is requested at the door. The building is handicapped accessible. Additional parking is available at Redeemer Church of Knoxville, 1642 Highland Ave.

More than 15 writing groups are currently part of the KWG, with genres including poetry, playwriting, literary fiction, crime and mystery, sci-fi/fantasy, prompt writing and creative non-fiction. The guild also features two groups specifically designed for teen writers. A representative from most groups will be available, and writers are encouraged to bring copies of their books to sell in anticipation of the holidays. Sales tables will also be provided for those KWG members not currently part of one of the groups.

The Knoxville Writers’ Guild exists to facilitate a broad and inclusive community for area writers, provide a forum for information, support and sharing among writers, help members improve and market their writing skills and promote writing and creativity.

Additional information about KWG can be found at www.KnoxvilleWritersGuild.org.


CK interviews author Tim Dorsey

by Laura Long Martin, Celebrate Knoxville.   New York Times Best Selling author Tim Dorsey says that increasing phishing/trolling directed towards his work was one of the reasons behind his novel “Tiger Shrimp Tango,” a book featuring his characters Serge Storms, his sidekick Coleman, and the latter-day noir private eye Mahoney.

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Fiction readers who enjoy satire and gonzo humor will love Tim Dorsey’s latest edition in the Serge Storms saga, Tiger Shrimp Tango, published by William Morrow, an imprint of Harper Collins Publishers, 2014.

“We always had Email stuff, you know, but we started getting calls to the house about my computer, folks saying they were from Microsoft but they weren’t, and that’s when I started looking into the State Attorney’s office for information on what scams were increasing in Florida,” Dorsey told Celebrate Knoxville in a telephone interview today. “I saw this vast menu of scams going on and that became the theme for this book.”

Another ongoing theme in every Dorsey book is a visit to Florida landmarks such as Gatorland and Cypress Gardens, and Tiger Shrimp Tango treats readers to a visit to the state’s famed Tupperware Museum, a place that honors the invention of the Tupperware party by a Florida entrepreneur.

“I actually remember my Grandmother and my Mom having these Tupperware parties and people came from all over the neighborhood for these things,” Dorsey said. “It was a major social event. I really did visit that museum and that entire section of the book is about that visit.”

Fans of Dorsey’s work are always delighted in his ability to throw in trivia and word play that has a standalone quality but is always a part of the story, such as:

“Someone else paced feverishly with a telephone, cigar, and bitterness.” (pg. 131) and “…cheekbones jutted like a cross between Nicholas Cage and a competitive cyclist.” (pg 188).

“My wife calls it ‘brain candy,’ which I think is very kind,” Dorsey says. “She says that that’s the part of my stories that she looks for and really enjoys.”

Although Tiger Shrimp Tango was published this year, Dorsey says he already has a new photography book and a new novel ready to hit the shelves, “Shark Skin Suite,” on January 27, 2015.

“The photography book is the second one I put together of the places I have visited in Florida,” Dorsey said. “The first one worked out really well so I did another. They are only available on my web site. The new novel is very cinematic, a legal thriller, but not like any you’ve read before.”

Dorsey was a reporter and editor for the Tampa Tribune from 1987 to 1999.

Visit www.timdorsey.com.


Knoxville hosts Fanboy Expo

The region’s premier pop culture meet-and-greet and collectibles event, Fanboy Expo, comes to the Knoxville Convention Center, Nov. 7-9, 2014.

Cult classic lovers and comic book aficionados will travel to Knoxville for the chance to meet their favorite celebrity actors and comic illustrators. The expo also will feature vendors selling comic books, toys and other fandom paraphernalia.

Celebrities will be available throughout the weekend to answer questions from fans, pose for pictures and sign photos and memorabilia. Some of the notable guests will include:

• John Rhys-Davies, best known as Gimli the dwarf in the Lord of the Rings trilogy.

• Henry Winkler, who played Arthur “Fonzie” Fonzarelli in the 1970s sitcom, “Happy Days”

• Peter Mayhew, the actor behind Chewbacca in the “Star Wars” series

• William Zabka, best known as villain Johnny Lawrence in “The Karate Kid”

• Tommy Flanagan, Emilio Rivera, Rusty Coones, Michael Ornstein, Kristen Renton and

Natalie Skyy known for their roles on the hit FX series, “Sons of Anarchy”

• George Newbern, the voice of Superman in the animated Justice League series

• Sarah Douglas, best known as Ursa opposite Christopher Reeve in “Superman” and

“Superman II”

• Shannon Farnon, who voiced Wonder Woman in “Super Friends”

• Dee Wallace, best known as Elliott’s mom in “E.T.: The Extraterrestrial”

• Sandahl Bergman, known for her role as Valeria in “Conan the Barbarian” with Arnold

Schwarzenegger.

• Rodger Bumpass, the voice of Squidward in “SpongeBob SquarePants”

• Several cast members from AMC’s “The Walking Dead”

• Julius LeFlore, stuntman for “Return of the Jedi”

• Wrestling legends Jim Duggan, known as “Hacksaw Jim Duggan,” and Chris Chavis, “known

as “Tatanka”

The exhibition booths with comic books, movie props and other fandom paraphernalia will be open from 4 to 9 p.m. Friday; 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday; and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. General admission tickets are available for purchase at the door, $15-$25 single day and $50 weekend.


Lisa Soland to speak at KWG

Playwright and children’s book author Lisa Soland will speak about overcoming insecurities and playing to strengths at the next Knoxville Writers’ Guild program. The event, which will be open to the public, will begin at 7 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 6, 2014 at the Laurel Theater, at the corner of Laurel Avenue and 16th Streets (in Fort Sanders). A $2 donation is requested at the door. The building is handicapped accessible.

Soland’s second children’s book, titled “The Unmade Moose,” will be released this month and will serve as her inspiration for the evening’s presentation.

“The new book is based on my younger brother who was born without a leg. The story encourages people who have insecurities regarding what they view as their imperfections, to go out into the world, and go for it anyway,” she said.

Soland comes to the book publishing world as a renowned playwright, with 40 plays including “Waiting,” “Cabo San Lucas,” “Truth Be Told,” “The Name Game” and “The Man in the Gray Suit & Other Plays” published internationally by Samuel French, Inc.


Celebrate Knoxville salutes horror writers

This week Celebrate Knoxville salutes The Horror Writers Association, the premier organization of writers and publishers of horror and dark fantasy and home of the iconic Bram Stoker Awards for superior achievement in horror literature.

Locally, residents will enjoy visiting any branch of the Knox County Public Library for great books as well as fun activities for all ages. As the oldest continuously operating public library in the state of Tennessee, the KCPL offers more than one million books, periodicals, compact discs, films, audiobooks and downloadables through 19 locations across Knox County.

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Since launching on October 1, the HWA Horror Selfies social media campaign has become a viral sensation garnering over nine million impressions on Facebook and Twitter during its first two weeks. The effort has attracted the attention of literary legends and The New York Times bestselling authors Stephen King, Peter Straub, and Ramsey Campbell, as well as some of cinema’s biggest names of past and present, including directors Mick Garris (THE STAND) and Josh Boone (THE FAULT IN OUR STARS).

The Horror Writers Association is a nonprofit organization of writers and publishing professionals around the world, dedicated to promoting dark literature and the interests of those who write it. The HWA formed in 1985 with the help of many of the field’s greats, including Dean Koontz, Robert McCammon, and Joe Lansdale. Today, with over 1250 members around the globe, it is the oldest and most respected professional organization for the much-loved writers who have brought you the most enjoyable sleepless nights of your life.

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Digital devices bookmobile visits Knoxville

The Digital Bookmobile National Tour is coming to downtown Knoxville on Sunday, October 19, 1-5 p.m. at Lawson McGhee Library to help showcase the library’s free ebook and audiobook service.

At this free event, readers of all ages will learn how to access ebooks and audiobooks from the library through interactive demonstrations and high-definition instructional videos. Food trucks and street musicians will be on hand as well.

A gadget gallery-featuring Kindle® Fire, iPad® Mini, Android™ Galaxy Tablet, NOOK™ HD+, Creative® Zen, Kindle® Paperwhite, Windows® Phone 8, and more-will help visitors discover portable devices that are compatible with the library’s digital service.

Library card holders can also check out digital titles anytime, anywhere. The Lawson McGhee Library is located at 500 W. Church Avenue in Knoxville.

For more information, visit www.knoxlib.org.


Bookmobile stops at Neyland Stadium

The public is invited to join the Knox County Public Library in the East Lot beside Neyland Stadium from 9 a.m. to noon on Sept. 6, 2014 for a tailgating party with the ultimate bookmobile as the Books from Birth 10th Anniversary Tour makes a stop at Neyland Stadium.

Activities include enrolling children in the program, recognizing the work of volunteers and donors and engaging communities in support of the program. The event will provide reading-themed giveaways for children at each stop.

The statewide Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library program is made possible through a one-to-one match by the Governor’s Books from Birth Foundation.