Tales and Tamales in Knoxville

KNOXVILLE, TN – The Knoxville History Project (KHP) will be hosting “Tales and Tamales at Gallows Hill,” on Thursday, October 26, 2017 at 6 p.m., at 516 West Vine Avenue. The event is a fundraiser to support the work of the Knoxville History Project which researches and promotes the history of Knoxville. Tickets are $100 each (tax-deductible contribution) can be purchased via knoxvillehistoryproject.org/events.

Event Features:

-Knoxville Halloween Stories with renowned historian Jack Neely – tales of how Knoxvillians have celebrated October 31 throughout the city’s history.

-Music from Kukuly and the Gypsy Fuego, the Django-style string-jazz combo, the likes of which probably played in the Carpenters Union ballroom during the 1940s and featuring one of the spookiest songs in Knoxville’s history, Leola Manning’s 1930 cult classic, “Satan is Busy in Knoxville.”

-Special Shadow Side Ghost Tour of Gallows Hill – the area around the north end of downtown – with historian Laura Still from Knoxville Walking Tours. Every guest will leave with a signed copy of Laura’s in-depth book “A Haunted History of Knoxville.”

-Good old tamale dinner, provided by Good Golly Tamale, who in recent years have been reviving a Knoxville tradition that “Tamale King” Harry Royston started near the Old City in 1887.

-This will be Knoxville History Project’s very first event in the historic ca. 1946 building where KHP calls home. The event will be held upstairs in the old meeting hall that once hosted both union meetings and community dances.

The Knoxville History Project (KHP) is an educational nonprofit with a mission to research and promote the history and culture of Knoxville.


Jenkins is new Dogwood Arts exec

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. – Dogwood Arts, a nonprofit organization which promotes and celebrates the arts, culture and natural beauty of the greater Knoxville region, has announced its new Executive Director is Sherry Jenkins. The Dogwood Arts Search Committee interviewed many applicants from across the country and Sherry emerged as the candidate of choice.

“We believe (Jenkins) is the perfect fit as we move Dogwood Arts into the future,” said Shanna Browning, president of the Dogwood Arts board of directors.

Sherry Jenkins (pictured) has served on the Dogwood Arts board since 2014 and most recently was Vice President, Operations for National Services, LLC. She has vast experience in Executive level management and project management along with extensive fundraising experience and volunteer leadership across a number of local nonprofit organizations. Ms. Jenkins also holds a B.F.A. from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

Dogwood Arts started in 1955 led by members of the Knoxville Garden Club and other concerned citizens with a vision that began as a civic beautification project… the Dogwood Trails. Over the last 62 years Dogwood Arts has become a year-round celebration of the area’s beauty through a variety of cultural events and exhibits such as Art in Public Places, Rhythm N Blooms, Chalk Walk, and the Dogwood Arts Festival on Market Square.


Knoxville launches new website

KNOXVILLE, TN – The Arts & Culture Alliance has launched KnoxSpacebook.com, an online, searchable database of creative spaces in the Greater Knoxville area. The exciting new resource allows artists, creatives and makers of all kinds to more easily find and book space they need for rehearsals, dance classes, workshops, photo/film locations, auditions.

Spaces included on the website currently include: The Basement Community Art Studio, The Bijou Theatre, Broadway Academy of Performing Arts and Event Center, Candoro Arts and Heritage Center, The Center for Creative Minds, The Central Collective, Chilhowee Park, Clarence Brown Lab Theatre, Clarence Brown Theatre Mainstage, The Emporium Center, The Hive, The Jackson Terminal, Knoxville Arts and Fine Crafts Center, Knoxville Botanical Garden & Arboretum, Knoxville Convention Center, Mabry-Hazen House, Marble Springs State Historic Site, McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture, Mighty Mud, Modern Studio, The Muse Knoxville, New Harvest Park Community Building, Powell Recital Hall, The Standard, Street Beatz Studio, Striped Light, Sundress Academy for the Arts, Tennessee Theatre, Ula Love Doughty Carousel Theatre, and UT Gardens. More spaces will be added as they come online.

“We’re thrilled to be able to announce this new resource for local artists,” says Liza Zenni, Executive Director of the Arts & Culture Alliance. “We want to help artists, creatives and makers of all kinds find useful spaces throughout Knoxville for the execution and presentation of their work. Spaces including auditoriums, commercial spaces, dance studios, galleries, and more all have a place in these important processes.”


The directory on KnoxSpacebook.com may be searched by keyword and/or zip code to access an interactive map of nearby rentable locations. Image of the view next to the Knoxville Sunsphere courtesy of Knoxville Convention Center.


Oak Ridge Symphony features soprano

The Oak Ridge Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Music Director Dan Allcott, celebrates its 73rd season with “Motor City, Mother Goose, Glitter, and Gloria!” on Saturday, October 7, 2017 at 7:30 PM at the Oak Ridge High School Performing Arts Center. The Oak Ridge Chorus, led by Jaclyn Johnson, will join the Oak Ridge Symphony Orchestra for Francis Poulenc’s sacred choral work, Gloria.

The opener for the 73rd season of the Oak Ridge Symphony will also feature American soprano, Alison Trainer, as soloist for Poulenc’s Gloria, in addition to music by Verdi, Bernstein, and more. Photo submitted.

Coloratura soprano Alison Trainer is a gifted singing actress, who has garnered top prizes in several major vocal competitions and is increasingly gaining recognition for her vocal beauty, sensitive and intelligent musicianship, and compelling stage presence. Alison recently received glowing reviews for her European debut as Fiakermilli in Arabella in St. Gallen, Switzerland. The St. Galler Nachrichten raved, “Completely amazing were the vocal acrobatics of Fiakermilli, sung by Alison Trainer with virtuosic and sparkling coloratura.”

“I am so pleased to reconnect with soprano, Alison Trainer, who has just started a new teaching position at Furman University after several years singing roles at the Opera House in St. Gallen, Switzerland,” said Music Director, Dan Allcott. “In addition to her featured role as soloist in the Gloria, Trainer will sing two solo arias – one from a Verdi opera, and the other, a laugh-out-loud romp from Bernstein’s Candide entitled ‘Glitter and Be Gay’”.

The concert will also feature Maurice Ravel’s Mother Goose Suite and music by celebrated American composer, Jonathan Bailey Holland. “Mr. Holland and I met when I conducted a world premiere of his music with the Dallas Symphony in 2004,” said Dan Allcott. “Since then, I have championed his works. Motor City Remix combines the rhythms and sounds of Motown in a classical remix. It’s always an audience favorite!”

The Oak Ridge Civic Music Association is a proud participant in the Penny4Arts program. All students, 18 & under, may attend any Oak Ridge Symphony Orchestra, Chorus, and Chamber Music concert for free during the 2017-18 season. General admission is $25; a discounted young adult ticket (ages 19-29) is available for $10.

Alison Trainer’s appearance with the Oak Ridge Symphony Orchestra is made possible with generous support from Ms. Norma Woy. Music rentals for the Symphony are made possible with generous support from Mr. James Rome. Additional support for the Oak Ridge Civic Music Association is provided by the Tennessee Arts Commission and WUOT 91.9 FM.

The Oak Ridge Civic Music Association presents professional performances in the Oak Ridge community with its symphony, chorus, and chamber music series. Subscription and individual tickets may be purchased online at www.ORCMA.org or by calling (865) 483-5569.

**Attached images: Alison Trainer; Oak Ridge Symphony Orchestra; WUOT 91.9 FM; Tennessee Arts Commission


New works at Emporium Oct. 2017

KNOXVILLE, TN – The Arts & Culture Alliance is pleased to present five new exhibitions at the Emporium Center in downtown Knoxville from October 6-27, 2017. A reception will take place on Friday, October 6, from 5:00-9:00 PM as part of First Friday activities downtown to which the public is invited to meet the artists and view the artwork. Knoxville Shimmy Mob and the UT Electroacoustic Ensemble will perform during the reception. Most of the works are for sale and may be purchased through the close of the exhibition.

Tennessee Artists Association: The Fall Juried Show: 43rd Fall Art Exhibition in the lower gallery
The Tennessee Artists Association (TAA) will feature original art by over 20 Tennessee artists including oils, watercolors, acrylics, pastels, photography, and mixed media.

The Arrowmont Experience in the Balcony gallery
The Arrowmont Experience will feature work by its current Artists-in-Residence, Max Adrian, Emily Culver, Elyse-Krista Mische, Paige Ward, and Xia Zhang, as well as a small selection of works from its permanent collection. This exhibition is presented in conjunction with Tennessee Craft Week, October 6-15, a collection of craft events and happenings across the state each October.

The Artists-in-Residence Program provides early career, self-directed artists time, space and support to experiment and develop a new body of work in a creative community environment. Each year, five artists of different media are selected for the eleven month program, which begins mid-June and continues through late May of the following year. Participants receive exhibition opportunities, teaching experience, professional development and a private studio. Arrowmont’s artists-in-residence will showcase contemporary, craft-based works using a range of media including ceramics, fiber, mixed media, drawing, and installation. The current Artists-in-Residence include:
Max Adrian – fiber artist creating three-dimensional sculptural forms: www.maxadrian.com
Emily Culver – multimedia jeweler: www.emily-culver.com
Elyse-Krista Mische – printmaking, drawing, and ceramics: www.lifepropaganda.com
Paige Ward – ceramic and sculpture artist: www.paigeward.com
Xia Zhang – multi-media artist creating work centered on the vessel: www.xiayzhang.com

Synthia Clark: Anthropomorphize in the display case
With a background in photojournalism, Synthia Clark is an award-winning photographer based in Knoxville with a focus towards what she calls “the little things.” To Synthia, these are the obscure, usually unnoticed details all around us. In this exhibition, she focuses on finding faces in our surroundings.

Richard Jansen: Painting with Light on the North Wall
Photography has been Richard Jansen’s passion since 1970 after he returned home from Vietnam. As a freelance photographer, his motivation comes from his surrounding world. Image: Courtesy Richard Jansen.

“It is what I believe to be a beautiful gift from God,” says Jansen.

Melanie Fetterolf: The Love of Nature in the Atrium
The Love of Nature Painting series reflects a spiritual belief by the artist that a higher power has a hand in all that we do. The paintings are begun by hand, then given to nature (rain), and finally finished again by the artist. The paintings are a study of the juxtaposition of color and line, an experiment in the use of texture, and the abstract, uncontrolled nature of falling rain. They reflect a need by the artist to let go of control and allow the random and chaotic nature of the technique to create beauty.

The exhibitions are on display at the Emporium Center, 100 S. Gay Street, in downtown Knoxville. Exhibition hours are Monday-Friday, 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM. For more information, please contact the Arts & Culture Alliance at (865) 523-7543, or visit the Web site at www.knoxalliance.com.


Three Sisters at Carousel Theatre

KNOXVILLE, TN – Anton Chekhov’s classic “Three Sisters,” in a new adaptation by Libby Appel, will play in the Carousel Theatre September 27 to October 15, 2017. A Talk Back with the cast will take place Sunday, October 8 following the matinee and the Open Captioned performance is Sunday, October 15 at 2:00 pm.


Languishing in a provincial town far from their beloved Moscow, sisters Olga, Masha and Irina yearn for the sparkling city of their childhood, where they believe all dreams will come true. Acknowledged as a masterpiece of the world stage, “Three Sisters” is Chekhov’s tour de force investigation of a family navigating the space between reality and dreams. Image: Carlène Pochette, Emily Kicklighter, and Lauren Pennline in the CBT’s 2017/2018 production of “Three Sisters.” Photo by Elizabeth Aaron.

“The emotions and ordeals of the twelve principal characters are shown through all their laughter, tears and anxieties. The play’s themes of love, desire, unrequited affection and death are just as relevant and pertinent to today’s audiences, who quickly become absorbed by the experiences of each discrete character,” said Michael Fry, director.

Michael Fry (Director) was born and is still based in London. He has worked as director and writer at theatres including, in the UK, the Liverpool Everyman, Nottingham Playhouse, Mercury Colchester, Watermill Newbury, Cambridge Theatre Company and for the Welsh National Opera and Glyndebourne. He was Arts Council Assistant Director at Chester Gateway and Arts Council Associate at the Nuffield, Southampton. Work in London includes the Young Vic, the Lyric Hammersmith, the Gate, Soho Theatre, the King’s Head, the Royal Court and the National Theatre. Work abroad includes Ireland, Italy, France, Romania, Estonia, South Africa, China and frequently in the United States. His plays and adaptations have been performed in theatres throughout England, America and Australasia. He has been artistic director of Floorboards Theatre Productions, Great Eastern Stage and Not the National Theatre, senior lecturer at Coventry, Middlesex and London Universities and Visiting Professor of Theatre at Washington and Webster Universities in the US. He is currently Deputy Director of East 15 Acting School in London.

The cast is comprised of visiting guest artists, UT Theatre faculty and graduate and undergraduate students, as well as community actors.

Visiting guest artist Christian Gray (Aleksander Ignatyevich Vershinin) is making his Clarence Brown debut. Chicago Theatre: Court Theatre, First Folio (Artistic Associate), Remy Bumppo, ShawChicago (Ensemble Member), Writers’ Theatre, 20 others. Regional Theatre: Artists’ Ensemble (IL), Cumberland County Playhouse (TN), Fort Worth Shakespeare (TX), Kentucky Repertory, Montana Shakespeare, Pennsylvania Stage Company. Film credits: “Day 1,” “Plastic,” “Reclamation,” “Drifted,” and “The Judas Run.” Television: “Chicago PD,” and “The Blackwood Prophecies.” Commercial: Horseshoe Casino, Stein Garden and Gifts.

Visiting guest artist Joseph McGranaghan (Nikolai Lvovich Tuzenbakh) is happy to be home in Knoxville, where he grew up on live theatre at the Clarence Brown. He was last seen here in the 2013 CBT production of “Noises Off.” New York theatre credits include: La MaMa ETC and Magis Theatre, Remix, Mabou Mines Resident Artist Workshop, Hudson Warehouse, and Storm Theatre, among others. Regionally: Baltimore Centerstage, Asolo Rep, Philadelphia’s Lantern Theatre, Pittsburgh City Theatre, Quantum Theatre, Pittsburgh Irish and Classical Theatre, Chamber Theatre of Boston, Urbanite Theatre, Luna Stage, Centenary Stage Company, and others. Film and TV: “Hack My Life,” “The Lucky Six,”
“Door to Door,” and “Eight Degrees in Suburbia.” He received his MFA from the FSU/ Asolo Conservatory.

Visiting guest artist Roderick Peeples (Ivan Romanovich Chebutykin) is based in Chicago. Most recent CBT credits: “A Christmas Carol,” “The Crucible,” and “The Open Hand.” Previously at CBT he was in “The Threepenny Opera,” “Amadeus,” and “Life of Galileo.” A two-time recipient of Joseph Jefferson Citations, his Chicago credits include: Chicago Shakespeare, Goodman, Steppenwolf, Remy Bumppo, Victory Gardens, Famous Door, Court, and Next theatres. Regional credits: Utah Shakespeare Festival, Syracuse Stage, Madison Repertory, and Illinois Shakespeare Festival. Film: Robert Altman’s “The Company,” “Road to Perdition,” “Novocaine,” “The Hudsucker Proxy.” TV: “Chicago Med,” “Prison Break,” “ER,” “Early Edition,” and the “Untouchables” series (syndicated).

Visiting guest artist Christopher Tramantana (Fyodor Ilyich Kulygin) is thrilled to be back at The Clarence Brown Theatre. A New York based actor, he is a proud alum of UT’s graduate acting program. New York theatre credits include: Hard Sparks, Planet Connections, TerraNOVA, Greenlight Productions, HERE, Playwrights Horizons, and NYTW. Regional theater credits include: Next Act Theater, Milwaukee, and the CBT. Christopher also teaches clown at NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts. BA in Theatre: Fordham University at Lincoln Center; MFA in Acting: University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

UT Theatre professional, local professional and community actors include Brian Gligor, Robert Stephan, and Nancy Duckles. UT Theatre graduate and undergraduate actors include: Charlotte Munson, Emily Kicklighter, Carlène Pochette, Lauren Pennline, Miguel A. Faña, Evan Price, Ben Pratt, Julius Gross, Ben Terpstra, Celeste Pelletier and Maddie Poeta.

The creative team for this production includes: visiting guest designer Matthew Tibbs (Sound Designer); UT MFA candidates Alice Trent (Lighting Design) and Jelena Andzic (Scenic Design); and UT Theatre faculty member Bill Black (Costume Design). Also assisting are Shelly Pack Payne (Production Stage Manager); Candace Moore (Assistant Director); Collin Hall (Assistant Stage Manager); Delaynie Rizer (Assistant Stage Manager); and Bonnie Valerio (Assistant Stage Manager).

Two Previews for “Three Sisters” are Wednesday, September 27 and Thursday, September 28 followed by Opening Night Friday, September 29. The production runs through October 15. UT faculty/staff, senior citizens, military personnel, children and students receive discounts. For tickets, call the Clarence Brown Theatre box office at 865-974-5161, Knoxville Tickets at 865-656-4444 or order online 24/7 at www.clarencebrowntheatre.com


New works at Marble City Opera

KNOXVILLE, TN – Marble City Opera will present a double-bill of Menotti’s The Telephone and Poulenc’s The Human Voice. Performances will be presented at The Square Room, Knoxville, Tennessee at 8:00pm on October 6-7, 2017.

Marble City Opera is pleased to return to The Square Room in downtown Knoxville with the presentation of these two short operas in English about women on the telephone. The Telephone is a 30-minute comic opera about Lucy, who is always on the phone, and Ben, who is trying to propose to her, but every time he tries to ask, the phone rings.

Poulenc’s The Human Voice is a 40-minute dramatic opera about Elle who is having her last conversation with her lover, who now loves someone else, and is based on Jean Cocteau’s play La Voix Humaine. Audiences will immediately relate to these two operas that take a look at women and their relationships through their ability to connect over the telephone.

“Marble City Opera continues to bring accessible opera performances to new venues and new audiences in Knoxville,” says reviewer Alan Sherrod of Arts Knoxville.

Tickets can be purchased online at www.marblecityopera.com. General admission is $25 online and $35 at the door.


Author Quade is speaker at UT

KNOXVILLE, TN – On Monday, September 25, 2017 Kirstin Valdez Quade will read at the University of Tennessee. The event is part of UT’s Writers in the Library reading series. Kirstin Valdez Quade is the author of Night at the Fiestas, winner of the John Leonard Prize, the Sue Kaufman Prize, and a “5 Under 35” award from the National Book Foundation.

“Set mainly in tight-knit Catholic, Mexican-American communities in New Mexico,” write the Dallas Morning News, Night at the Fiestas “enthralls with tales of people striving to better their lives while enduring the aftermath of past mistakes.” The New York Times calls three of Quade’s stories from Night at the Fiestas “legitimate masterpieces” and goes on to say, “This is a variety of beauty too rare in contemporary literature.”

Kirstin Valdez Quade’s work has also appeared in The New Yorker, The Southern Review, and Guernica, and it has been anthologized in The Best American Short Stories and The O. Henry Prize Stories. Currently she is an assistant professor of creative writing at Princeton University.

The reading begins at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of the John C. Hodges Library. The event is free and open to the public; all are encouraged to attend. A brown bag Q&A, open to University of Tennessee students, will be held at noon in 1210 McClung Tower.

The mission of Writers in the Library is to “showcase the work of novelists, poets, and other literary craftsmen.” Some of the best voices in contemporary literature are invited to read. The series is sponsored by the UT Libraries and the Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund.

For more information, contact Erin Elizabeth Smith, Jack E. Reese Writer-in-Residence at the UT Libraries, at esmith83@utk.edu or visit http://library.utk.edu/writers for a complete schedule of Writers in the Library readings for the 2017-2018 academic year.


Economic announcement scheduled

KNOXVILLE, TN – On Monday, September 11, 2017 at 4:45 PM, the Arts & Culture Alliance and the Tennessee Arts Commission will hold a joint presentation to announce the results of the recent Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 (AEP5) study that measured the cumulative economic impact of the non-profit arts sector in the region and across the state. The presentation will be held at the Knoxville Museum of Art, 1050 World’s Fair Park Drive. Presenters include Anne Pope, Executive Director of the Tennessee Arts Commission and Liza Zenni, Executive Director of the Arts & Culture Alliance.

“We are delighted to be able to have our economic impact figures validated by the professionals with Americans for the Arts,” says Liza Zenni. “Community leaders should no longer be surprised when outside experts, number crunchers and data collectors tell them that 9 percent of Greater Knoxville’s population is employed in an arts-related job.”

“By every measure, the results of Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 prove that the arts are an industry—a generator of government revenue, a cornerstone of tourism, and an employment powerhouse both locally and across the nation,” said Robert L. Lynch, president and CEO of Americans for the Arts. “Leaders who care about community and economic vitality, growing tourism, attracting an innovative workforce, and community engagement can feel good about choosing to invest in the arts.”

The Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 study was conducted by Americans for the Arts and supported by The Ruth Lilly Fund of Americans for the Arts.


KJO celebrates Sarah Vaughn

KNOXVILLE, TN – The Knoxville Jazz Orchestra’s 2017-18 concert season begins on Tuesday, September 12, 2017 at 8pm with “Tribute to Sarah Vaughan Featuring Deborah Brown”. The program will be held at The Mill and Mine at 227 West Depot Avenue, in Knoxville.

Join the KJO and vocalist-extraordinaire Deborah Brown as we pay tribute to one of the most beloved artists of the 20th century, Ms. Sarah Vaughan. Dubbed “The Divine One” and “Sassy,” Vaughan’s interpretations of popular songs helped canonize what is now known as the Great American Songbook. Vocalist Deborah Brown might well be the heir-apparent to Vaughan, possessing a flawless technique, incredible range of expression, masterful sense of swing and effortless command of subtle harmony. A native of Kansas City, Deborah brings with her a wealth of experience, expertise and exciting arrangements of classic songs. A must see event for all music lovers!

The Knoxville Jazz Orchestra is a 17 piece big band comprised of professional musicians from across the region. Since its inception in 1999, the orchestra has performed dozens of concerts in East Tennessee, appeared on major jazz festivals in Europe, performed and recorded with internationally acclaimed guest artists, and released four critically acclaimed CD recordings.

Tickets for the event are $36.50 adult, $15.00 student. Tickets are available in advance at http://www.knoxjazz.org


Oak Ridge Symphony begins season

The Oak Ridge Civic Music Association will celebrate the beginning of its 73rd season with the Oak Ridge Symphony Orchestra’s Free Family Concert on Sunday, September 17, 2017 at 3:00 PM at the Oak Ridge High School Performing Arts Center. This year’s concert, titled “String Fling”, will celebrate the string instruments of the orchestra, including a special opportunity for local string players to join the Oak Ridge Symphony Orchestra on stage for a play-along. The Free Family Concert is perfect for families and music lovers of all ages and includes informative pieces and instrument demonstrations so that first-timers can learn about the symphony orchestra.

“I am always excited to conducting the annual Free Family Concert with the Oak Ridge Symphony Orchestra,” said Music Director, Dan Allcott. “We look forward to performing alongside string players of all ages and giving young people a chance to get their hands on a variety of string instruments at our instrument petting zoo!”

The concert will feature classic melodies and familiar tunes, including “Singin’ in the Rain”, “Pizzicato Polka”, “Boil Them Cabbage Down”, and more. Ralph Einstein Youth Aliyah Concert competition winner, violinist Kate Hausladen, will perform Wieniawski’s Scherzo-Tarantella with the orchestra.

Members of the Oak Ridge High School orchestra program will perform in the lobby before and after the concert. After the concert, audience members of all ages are invited to participate in an instrument petting zoo: there will be instruments of various sizes for guests to try, with instruction from the musicians of the orchestra. All are invited to attend a reception following the concert, enjoy fun craft activities, and meet members of the Oak Ridge Symphony Orchestra.

“Our organization is proud to present this free event each season for all East Tennesseans,” said Rachel Perkins Haverkamp, Executive Director of the Oak Ridge Civic Music Association. “In addition to the free family concert, we also invite students to attend all symphony, chorus, and chamber series concerts for free throughout the season.”

The concert and all activities are free for the entire family. Support for the Free Family Concert is generously provided by Spectra Tech. Additional support for the Oak Ridge Civic Music Association is provided by the Tennessee Arts Commission and WUOT 91.9 FM.

The Oak Ridge Civic Music Association presents professional performances in the Oak Ridge community with its symphony, chorus, and chamber music series. Subscription and individual tickets may be purchased online at www.ORCMA.org or by calling (865) 483-5569. Photo courtesy Oak Ridge Civic Music Association.

 


Red Haired Mary at Laurel Theater

Jubilee Community Arts presents Red-Haired Mary on Friday, September 15, 2017, at 8 pm at at the Laurel Theater in downtown Knoxville.

Red-Haired Mary delivers Irish and other Celtic songs and tunes, sometimes in the Irish language and often in three-part harmony. Members of the band include Nancy Acuff, flute, tin whistle and vocals; Alycia Petrone, fiddle; Terry Schomer, bouzouki, guitar, mandolin, bodhran and bones; Margaret Scanlan, keyboards and vocals; and Tom Scanlan, bass, bodhran and vocals. Photo: submitted.

Tickets: $15 (discounts apply to advance purchase, JCA members, students & seniors)

Advance tickets available from brownpapertickets.com or 800-838-3006 ext 1.

The Laurel Theater is located on the corner of 16th and Laurel Avenue in the historic Fort Sanders neighborhood of Knoxville near the UT campus.

For additional information or photos call Brent Cantrell or Toby Koosman at (865) 522-5851 or email concerts@jubileearts.org.

The mission of Jubilee Community Arts is to promote, preserve and present the traditional performing arts of the southern Appalachian region and to nurture the cultural milieu responsible for the birth and evolution of these and related art forms. Jubilee Community Arts is a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation.


Pioneer Days at history museum

NORRIS, TN – Located on the beautiful grounds of the Museum of Appalachia, the “Days of the Pioneer” Antique Show has been scheduled for September 15-16, 2017. This antiques show features over sixty of the finest selection of 18th and 19th century antique dealers. The museum is located 16 miles north of Knoxville, one mile east of I‐75, exit 122.

Elaine Meyer, President of the Museum, said, “This show is truly a one of a kind event and is slated to be one of the best antique shows in the country. With the 65-acre Museum of Appalachia as a backdrop, attendees can experience the Museum which houses thousands of early American artifacts in their natural setting, and then have the opportunity to purchase similar items from scores of outstanding dealers who will be here from across the country.”

During the show, traditional craftsmen will be on the grounds demonstrating their various and centuries-old talents. The venue will also provide mountain music in different locations on the grounds while other areas will highlight Civil War-era soldiers and civilians in their period dress.

Tickets also include a tour of the Museum of Appalachia, a farm-village with some three dozen historic log structures, exhibit halls filled with authentic Appalachian artifacts, gardens, and farm animals in a picturesque setting surrounded by split-rail fences.

For more information please contact the museum at (865) 494-7680 or email museum@museumofappalachia.org.


Sundress presents literary readings

Knoxville, TN–Sundress Academy for the Arts welcomes Tanque R. Jones, Shannon Elizabeth Hardwick, and Erica Wright for the August installment of this year’s reading series. The reading will take place 2-4 p.m. Sunday, August 27, 2017 at a NEW location: Hexagon Brewing Co., located at 1002 Dutch Valley Dr STE 101, Knoxville, TN 37918. The Sundress Reading Series is free and open to the public.

Tanque R. Jones was one of the first poets to receive an MFA from the University of Tennessee in 2014. Her poems have appeared in Connecticut River Review, Colere, West Trade Review, and Clackamas Literary Review. Her first book, Woman in Transition, was published by WordTech Communications in 2016. In this sultry, hard-hitting collection, the poet is a truth-teller, speaking of race and class in East Tennessee, embodying strength and honor.

Shannon Elizabeth Hardwick’s work has appeared in Salt Hill, Stirring, Versal, The Texas Observer, Devil’s Lake, and Four Way Review, among others. She is listed as a contributor of both poetry and prose in A Shadow Map: An Anthology of Survivors of Sexual Assault published by Civil Coping Mechanisms. Hardwick has chapbooks out with Thrush Press and Mouthfeel Press, and serves as the poetry editor for The Boiler Journal. Before Isadore is her first full-length collection.

Erica Wright is the author of the poetry collections All the Bayou Stories End with Drowned (Black Lawrence Press, 2017) and Instructions for Killing the Jackal (Black Lawrence Press, 2011). Her poems have appeared in Crazyhorse, Denver Quarterly, Gulf Coast, New Orleans Review, and elsewhere. She is the poetry editor at Guernica Magazine as well as an editorial board member of Alice James Books. Her latest novel is The Granite Moth (Pegasus, 2015).

The Sundress Reading Series is an award-winning literary reading series that is held monthly at 2PM at Hexagon Brewing Co. just outside of downtown Knoxville.

For more information:
EMAIL: safta@sundresspublications.com, FACEBOOK: SundressAcademyfortheArts
PHONE: (865) 560-6106 TWITTER: @SundressPub


Quilts on display at ETHC

Knoxville, Tenn. – From histories handed down to mysteries that remain, the new feature exhibition at the Museum of East Tennessee History provides visitors the opportunity to learn the “stories in stitches” from the quilts that have been entrusted to the East Tennessee Historical Society.

Stories in Stitches features more than two dozen quilts with dates ranging from c. 1820 to 2001. The exhibition will be on display in the Rogers-Claussen Feature Gallery of the East Tennessee History Center from August 7, 2017 – January 2, 2018. Stories in Stitches is dedicated to Linda Claussen and Ginny Rogers for their years of service and support of the East Tennessee Historical Society’s quilt collection.

The exhibition highlights more than two dozen quilts in a variety of fabrics, and patterns, and highlights some of the families who have made and cherished them. Patterns include everything from Rose of Sharon and “Knoxville Crazy Quilt” to a Civil War memory quilt and one pieced together out of clothing labels. The quilters range from John Sevier’s wife Bonny Kate to the Smoky Mountain Quilters of Tennessee.

The Museum of East Tennessee History is open 9:00 am to 4:00 pm, Monday through Friday; 10:00 am to 4:00 pm, Saturday; and 1:00 pm to 5:00 pm, Sunday. Museum Admission is $5.00 for adults, $4.00 for seniors, and FREE for children under 16. Each Sunday admission is FREE to all and ETHS members always receive FREE admission. The Museum is located in the East Tennessee History Center, 601 South Gay Street, Knoxville, TN 37901.

For more information about booking the exhibition, scheduling a school tour, or visiting the museum, call (865) 215-8824, email eths@eastTNhistory.org, or visit www.easttnhistory.org.

“Rising from the Rubble,” 2001. Made and gifted by Joan McGinnis of Knox County, in memory of those who died in 9/11 attacks and all veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Photo submitted.


Art Market seeks artists

Knoxville’s Art Market Gallery is currently accepting applications for a Sunday, August 27, 2017 membership jury. Acceptance for membership is determined by a jury of six active gallery members and is based on the quality of the applicant’s work; the applicant’s ability to be involved in a cooperative effort; as well as, the needs of the gallery.

Patrons enjoy visiting the Art Market Gallery in downtown Knoxville during a recent First Friday celebration, a city-wide event with open house opportunities at local businesses. Photo by Celebrate Knoxville.

Currently the gallery is accepting applications from artists in ​2D & 3D media​. Prospective members may deliver four pieces of their work and completed application form with $30 jury fee to the gallery at 422 South Gay Street in downtown Knoxville.

Delivery may be made 11:00 am – 5:30 pm Tuesday, August 22nd through Saturday, August 26th, 2017.

Instructions and an application form are available at www.artmarketgallery.net​.


Alliance Arts awards announced

KNOXVILLE, TN – The Arts & Culture Alliance of Greater Knoxville is pleased to announce 33 awards to 36 local artists and organizations as part of the Ann and Steve Bailey Opportunity Grants for 2017-2018. This new program of the Arts & Heritage Fund, with awards distributed through the Alliance, provides financial and technical support to individual artists and small, professionally-oriented arts and culture organizations (with annual budgets under $100,000). The grants are designed to spur continued artistic and administrative growth in innovative, entrepreneurial artists and organizations at any stage in their development.

A total of 34 individuals and seventeen organizations applied for the competitive grants, and interviews determined the awards in June.

The following 22 individual applicants will receive a total of $68,492 in Bailey Opportunity grants for these projects:
+ Mike Berry – $2,170 for website upgrade and art workshops.
+ Jo Marie Brotherton – $1,923 for a one week master class from master glass artist, Astrid Reidel.
+ Marcus Carmon – $5,000 for documentary Canon camera kit.
+ Antuco Chicaiza – $1,500 for classes at Arrowmont.
+ Bobbie Crews – $1,200 for portrait painting classes.
+ Ace Edewards – $9,500 to study conducting at Sarasota Opera.
+ Kelly Hider – $544 to present and attend Southeaster College Art Conference in Columbus, OH.
+ Jackie Holloway – $1,511 for writing workshops.
+ Jonathan Howe – $2,179 for light dome tent.
+ Norman Magden – $4,939 for camcorder.
+ Renee Mathies – $1,923 for a one week master class from master glass artist, Astrid Reidel.
+ Cheryl Prose – $1,050 for a workshop at Arrowmont.
+ Denise Sanabria – $1,160 for classes at Arrowmont and Penland.
+ Arnold Schwartzbart (deceased) – $469 for archival materials to support collection acquisition by McClung Collection.
+ Emily Shane – $1,421 for digital cutter, cutting mat, and blades.
+ Stephen Spidell – $1,200 for lessons with Seth Haverkamp.
+ Jered Sprecher – $9,290 for research on “The Garden”.
+ Steven Trigg – $1,000 for video mentoring.
+ Trillium Piano Trio – $2,000 to develop a marketing plan.
+ Dominick White – $1,000 for professional vocal training.
+ Bryan Wilkerson – $8,163 to develop a mobile exhibition space.
+ John Powers & Joshua Bienko – $9,350 to establish a collaborative artist venue.

The following eleven organizations will receive a total of $31,431 in Bailey Opportunity grants for these projects:
+ Asian Culture Center – $800 for website improvements.
+ Cattywampus Puppet Council – $3,500 for work with Spiral Q in Philadelphia, PA.
+ Knoxville Community Darkroom – $2,830 to develop a mobile darkroom.
+ Generations Literacy Alliance – $2,000 for professional development for staff.
+ Go! Contemporary Dance – $4,900 for Canon XA35 camera, computer software, and training.
+ HoLa Hora Latina – $2,500 for website upgrade.
+ Knoxville Gay Men’s Chorus – $5,500 for management software and website upgrade.
+ Knoxville Guitar Society – $2,250 for Matthew Hinsley consultation.
+ Marble City Opera – $4,089 for portable keyboard.
+ Moving Theatre – $500 for Alliance for Better Nonprofits membership and consultation.
+ Tiger Lily Theatre – $2,562 for portable lighting system.

The goal of Bailey Opportunity Grants is to create a more vital creative community in Knoxville by: encouraging contributions to the city’s economy and quality of life by artists and arts and history organizations; positioning Knoxville as a community that honors its creative industry and supports the efforts of artists and organizations to achieve excellence; and raising public profiles of artists and organizations within the city and beyond.

The Arts & Culture Alliance serves and supports a diverse community of artists, arts organizations, and cultural institutions. The Alliance receives financial support from the Tennessee Arts Commission.

For more information, visit http://www.knoxalliance.com/bailey.


Shakespeare shows begin July 13

The Tennessee Stage Company presents its 27th summer Shakespeare Festival, featuring the comedies Two Gentlemen of Verona and The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged). The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged) opens the festival on Thursday, July 13, 2017 at Market Square. It continues through Aug. 12, alternating performances with Two Gentlemen of Verona which runs July 14 – Aug. 13.

Admission is free to the Market Square and Blount County Public Library performances.

The indoor matinees at the Scruffy City Hall are $15. A donation basket is passed at Market Square with a $ 10.00 suggested donation. Special VIP seating is available on the Square for $ 15.00.

THE TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA

July 13, 15, 21, 23, 27, 29, Aug. 4, 6, 10, 126

7:00 pm nightly outdoors on Market Square

What happens when a young man suddenly finds his best friend’s girlfriend more desirable than his own? Shakespeare’s refreshing comedy of first love is complete with wily servants, disguised lovers and Crab – the most lovable, ill mannered canine ever to grace the stage. Valentine and Proteus, the two gents in question, prove that Romeo was not the only young lad in Verona to fall in love! “What light is light, if Silvia be not seen/What joy is joy if Silvia be not by.”

THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (Abridged)

July 14, 16, 20, 22, 28, 30, Aug. 3, 5, 11, 13

7:00 pm nightly outdoors on Market Square

This is 37 Plays. Three Actors. 90 Minutes. The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged) is directed by H. Caitlin Corbitt and Two Gentlemen of Verona is directed by Amy Hubbard, founding Artistic Director of The Actor’s Co-Op.

For more information, call 865-546-4280 or e-mail tennesseestage@comcast.net

Shakespeare On The Square would not be possible without the support of the Tennessee Arts Commission, The Clayton Foundation, the CBID, the City of Knoxville and Knox County.


Museum of Appalachia hosts event

The Museum of Appalachia will once again celebrate Independence Day with an old fashioned “anvil shoot.” Every 4th of July, the Museum uses gunpowder to launch a 200-pound anvil hundreds of feet into the air. The anvil shoot is the centerpiece of a celebration that includes a bell-ringing ceremony, flag procession, old-fashioned games, music, and demonstrations from blacksmiths, beekeepers, patriotic re-enactors, and woodworkers. The Museum is also hosting a pie-baking contest; registration information and other details can be found at www.museumofappalachia.org.

“When the gunpowder ignites and the anvil soars into the air, the earth will literally shake,” says Museum President, Elaine Meyer. “The sound of the explosion can be heard for several miles.”

Anvil shoots were once a common way for pioneers to commemorate holidays, elections, and other special occasions. While the tradition of anvil-shooting is nearly obsolete, the Museum keeps a piece of history alive for a 21st century audience. Photo courtesy Museum of Appalachia.

July 4th anvil shoots are a nearly 30-year tradition for the Museum, but the event remains as exciting as ever. Garden & Gun magazine named the event the “Editors’ Choice” for “Goings-on in the South” in their June/July issue.

Anvil shoots are scheduled for 10:00 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 1:00 p.m., and 2:30 p.m.

The Museum is open from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., with special Independence Day activities from 10:00 a.m. until 3:00 p.m.

On this day, only, the Museum is offering a special family rate of $35. The event is free for Museum members. Tickets may be purchased at the Museum on the day of the event. For more information, visit the Museum’s website, or call 865-494-7680.


ACT presents Waiting for Godot

(Knoxville, Tenn.) – Director Holly Montgomery and All Campus Theatre present Samuel Beckett’s absurdly existential, existentially absurd Waiting for Godot. Performances are $15 general admission, $10 for students with ID.

Waiting for Godot tells the story of two men, Estragon and Vladimir, as they wait by a barren tree for the arrival of someone named Godot. While waiting, they quarrel, dance, contemplate suicide, eat, sleep, and discuss philosophy, religion, life, and death. As night draws near, they meet a Master and his Slave, and a young Boy claiming that he has been sent by Mr. Godot. When the same events take place the next day, the two men begin to question their existence and the inevitable futility of their wait for Godot, in what The NY World Telegram describes as “a portrait of the dogged resilience of a man’s spirit in the face of little hope.”

For more information about the Knoxville Performing Arts Exchange, Email carolyn@modernstudio.org or call (865) 776-2295.


Foundation to honor fathers

The contributions of four Knoxville area men will be celebrated at the 2nd Annual Scholarship Luncheon being held at the Crowne Plaza Hotel on Father’s Day, June 18, 2017. The event begins at 2:00 PM. The four honorees and four scholarship recipients were selected by the Beta Theta Boulé Foundation of Knoxville.

Each honoree has demonstrated strong “Fathering” skills and have modeled leadership, a commitment to educational achievement, and civic responsibility. According to Foundation President Harold Hicks, our Foundation believes these fathers and mentors strive to teach youth about equality, mutual respect for others, and a devotion to democratic traditions.

Among this years honorees are: Elder Christopher Battle, Pastor Tabernacle Baptist Church; Reginald Jenkins, Executive Director of UUNIK Academy, Inc. and Lecturer; Adriel McCord, Vice-President at First Tennessee Bank and co-chair, Blount County MLK, Jr Celebration Committee; and Willie G. Wilson, Founder and Chief Sensei at the Karate Five Association.

The $2,000 Zaevion Dobson Scholarship will be awarded to K’nori T. Bone, a student at Austin East High School. The other scholarship awardees are Moriah J. Brown, a student at Hardin Valley High School; Nisrine J. Hilizah, a student at West High School; and Chelsey B. Jordan, a student at the Webb School of Knoxville.

The Beta Theta Boulé Foundation is a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization. The Foundation is affiliated with the Beta Theta Boulé, which is the Knoxville Chapter of the African American professional fraternity, Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity, Incorporated. The Knoxville Chapter, was organized twenty-one years ago and has an impressive record of community service. The proceeds from this event will be used to fund scholarships for meritorious high school students in the Knoxville area.

Tickets to the event may be obtained from Nathaniel Foster, telephone number 865 386-4067, or by email at natfoster01@gmail.com. Tickets to the luncheon are available for a donation of $55.


Gilded Age on display

KNOXVILLE—The McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, opens the new exhibition “Fish Forks and Fine Furnishings: Consumer Culture in the Gilded Age,” on May 26, 2017.

The American Gilded Age, defined in the exhibition as 1870-1900, saw rapid growth in mass manufacturing, trade and travel—all of which gave Americans greater access to, and interest in, goods from around the world.

From fish forks and fashionable dress to furniture and fine china, the exhibition explores the personal and household objects that served as visible symbols of wealth, power and social class. The 100-plus objects in the exhibit point to the great changes that were occurring in America at the time, and also to our continuing preoccupation with the objects we choose to buy, wear and display. Image: Three-piece Afternoon Dress, c. 1880s, American, maker unknown. Cotton, velvet, silk. Gift of G.P. Gaut, 1947. Photo courtesy McClung Museum.

“The period’s fixation on wearing the right dress or setting an elegant table is no different than today’s focus on having the right style for one’s home or consuming the right foods or status bag as dictated by Pinterest, celebrities or the thousands of lifestyle gurus that all seem to have blogs and personal brands,” said Catherine Shteynberg, museum assistant director. Shteynberg curated the exhibit with curatorial assistant Melinda Narro.

The exhibit will include an installation of Knoxville native Frederick Bonham’s parlor in the Plaza Hotel in New York City, period dress and accessories, an array of unusual serving utensils and a formal dining table arrangement, and imported goods from across the world. Objects were collected by area families and come from the McClung Museum’s permanent collections, the UT Special Collections Library and the Museum of East Tennessee History.

The McClung Museum is located at 1327 Circle Park Drive. Museum admission is free, and the museum’s hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to Saturday and 1 to 5 p.m. on Sundays. Groups may schedule tours by calling 865-974-2144 or emailing museum@utk.edu.

Free two-hour museum parking passes are available from the parking information booth at the entrance to Circle Park Drive on weekdays by request. Free parking is available on Circle Park Drive on a first-come, first-served basis on weekends. Free public transportation to the museum is also available via the Knoxville Trolley Vol Line.

For more information about the McClung Museum and its collections and exhibits, visit mcclungmuseum.utk.edu.


70/30 Creatives present Shakespeare

Knoxville, Tenn.  – Seventy Thirty Creatives launches their inaugural full stage production with William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream this Memorial Day weekend. Edited to run approximately 75 minutes, catch this unique rendition at 8 p.m. on Saturday May 27, 2017 at Modern Studio, 109 Anderson Ave. in Happy Holler (North Knoxville).

On a Midsummer’s night, four young lovers find themselves tangled about an enchanted forest where sprites lurk and fairies rule. A feuding Fairy King and Queen cross paths with Bottom (Billy Kyle Roach), Quince (Caleb Burnham), and their gang of “rude mechanicals” presenting a play within the play. Chief mischief-maker Robin Goodfellow aka Puck (Raine Palmer) is on-hand to make sure the course of true love is anything but smooth. Games of mayhem, love and fantasy ensue in Shakespeare’s most magical comedy.


Broadway Studios call for artists

KNOXVILLE, TN – Broadway Studios and Gallery presents an open call to artists for the Music Show, an art competition based on the theme of music and what it means to the artist. All different types of interpretations are welcome. The art is judged on creativity and execution of the concept presented. Winners will be awarded cash prizes on First Friday, June 2, 2017 at 6pm. Doors open at 5pm.

Carl Gombert, art professor of Maryville College, will jury the show. You can learn about Carl at www.carlgombert.com.

All reasonable entries are accepted and each entry costs $5 each with a maximum of 3 entries per person.

All media is accepted. The only requirement is that all 2D must be framed with a wire ready to hang.

Drop off dates for artwork are Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, May, 25, 26 and 27th from 11am-7pm.

Winners will be awarded cash prizes on “First” Friday, June 2, 2017 at 6pm. Doors open at 5pm.

Parking is easy and on site. Light refreshments will be served.

Broadway Studios and Gallery is located at 1127 N Broadway, Knoxville, TN 37917.

Regular business hours are Thursday-Saturday 11am-7pm.

Broadway Studios and Gallery (BSG) is a collective of 10 artists working in individual studios under one roof. BSG hosts a new exhibit every month beginning on every First Friday of the month. The month long exhibit is free to the public. BSG also operates a retail space and individual artists teach in their own studios.

For more informations call Jessica Gregory at 865-556-8676.


Sheep Shearing Day at Museum

NORRIS, Tenn. –This Friday, from 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m., the Museum will host its second and final Sheep Shearing Day of the year. Students and families are invited to join the Museum as they welcome the warmth of spring by trimming the winter’s heavy growth of wool from their flock of sheep.

Last Friday, more than 1,000 students, parents, and teachers visited the Museum to celebrate a pioneer tradition.

Museum President, Elaine Meyer, said that this is the first year that the Museum is hosting two Sheep Shearing Days. Meyer said, “adding a second Sheep Shearing Day affords us the opportunity to share Appalachian history and culture with an even greater number of young people than ever before.”

The event will feature demonstrations of shearing, carding, spinning, weaving, and other ways that pioneers turned fleece into woven goods. Guests will also enjoy sheep herding, Appalachian music, an animal meet & greet, storytelling, and several historic demonstrations, including soap carving, beekeeping, sawmilling, blacksmithing, pioneer gardening, and dulcimer lessons.

Admission includes a tour of the Museum mountain farm and village, which contains some three-dozen historic log structures, exhibit halls filled with thousands of Appalachian artifacts, gardens, and free-range farm animals. For rates, go here: http://www.museumofappalachia.org/information/plan-your-visit/hours-and-admission.

School groups, homeschools, families, and individuals are all welcome to attend. Special student and group rates are available, and the event is free for Museum members. Groups of 20 or more, please call 865-494-7680 to make a reservation.

The Museum is located 16 miles north of Knoxville, one mile east of I-75, at Exit 122.

Visit MuseumofAppalachia.org.


Editors speak at Writers’ Guild

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. – Editors of three prestigious literary journals, Alexis Williams of New Millennium Writings, Richard Hermes of Grist, and Marianne Worthington of Still will explain what they’re looking for and how they work at the May program of the Knoxville Writers’ Guild. The program will take place Thursday, May 4, 2017 at 7:00 pm.

The public is invited to the program, which will be held in the Fellowship Hall of Central United Methodist Church, 201 East Third Avenue. Admission is a suggested $2 and parking is free.

Alexis Williams has been a part of New Millennium Writings (NMW) since its founding in 1996. An honors graduate of Middle Tennessee State University with a B.A. in English Literature, she spent several years working in higher education and in corporate communications and publishing, before taking over as Editor of NMW in 2012. She has to date published hundreds of writers within the pages of NMW and looks forward to many more years of rewarding and publishing members of the writing community.

Richard Hermes is a Ph.D. candidate in the creative writing program at the University of Tennessee. His awards include Minnesota Monthly’s Tamarack Award, a Minnesota State Arts Board grant, and a Luce Scholars fellowship to Thailand, where he worked as a writer and editor for eight years. His favorite invisible city is currently Euphemia.

Marianne Worthington grew up in Knoxville, Tennessee and moved to southeastern Kentucky in 1990 where she works as a teacher, editor & writer. In 2009 she co-founded Still: The Journal, an online literary journal with Silas House & Jason Howard. She has a poetry chapbook, Larger Bodies Than Mine, from Finishing Line Press, and she edited the first three volumes of the Motif anthology series from MotesBooks. She am also poetry editor (and the former book reviews editor) for Now & Then: The Appalachian Magazine.

The Knoxville Writers’ Guild exists to facilitate a broad and inclusive community for area writers, provide a forum for information, support and sharing among writers, help members improve and market their writing skills and promote writing and creativity. Additional information can be found at www.KnoxvilleWritersGuild.org.


Yellow Rose stages play readings

Yellow Rose Productions, a Knoxville based theatre company, is hosting the second annual Staged Reading Series for the Henley Rose Playwright Competition for Women. The staged readings will feature the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place plays from this year’s competition.

The staged readings are free to the public and are scheduled for three consecutive Monday evenings in late April and early May. Yellow Rose Productions will be teaming up with various theatre artists from around Knoxville to perform these readings. The April 24th and May 1st readings will be performed at Modern Studio and with the help of KPAX. The reading on May 8th will take place at the UT Lab Theatre and will be performed with support from The University of Tennessee Department of Theatre and the Clarence Brown Theatre.
The Henley Rose Playwright Competition for Women began in early 2015 and is endorsed by Pulitzer-prize winning playwright, Beth Henley. The competition offers women around the world an opportunity to be recognized for their work in playwriting.

Each year the Henley Rose Playwright Competition for Women accepts 200 submissions from all over the world. From these, a committee of readers narrows the plays down to a small group of Finalists. The 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place winners are then chosen and are invited to Knoxville to accept their cash prize and to be honored at the staged reading of their play.

For more information, visit: yellowroseproductions.org.


Carpetbag Theatre presents new work

The Carpetbag Theatre, Inc. is pleased to present, Cultural Odyssey’s Rhodessa! Fully Awake Facing Seventy “Heaven Betta Bea Honky Tonk!”, a performance that directly addresses aging, growing old with dignity and security. Performances are Friday, May 19, 2017 and Sunday, May 21, 2017 at 7:30PM at the Beck Cultural Exchange Center, 1927 Dandridge Ave, Knoxville, Tennessee. Tickets are available in advance for $15 at knoxtix.com and/or $20 at the door.

This is the third performance series presented by CBT in which Cultural Odyssey’s internationally renowned storytelling and cultural rhythms are shared with East Tennessee audiences. Carpetbag Theatre first presented Big Butt Girls, Hard Headed Women at the University of Tennessee’s Clarence Brown Theatre. Carpetbag Theatre brought Cultural Odyssey back to Knoxville during its 40th Anniversary Celebration as a part of the National Performance Network’s Annual meeting. They collaborated with Women of Calypso (international calypso artists from Trinidad/Tobago) in a performance presented at the Emporium Center in Knoxville.

About Cultural Odyssey

In 1979, Executive/Co-artistic Director Idris Ackamoor founded San Francisco based, Cultural Odyssey as an organization that combined music, theater and dance into a unified whole, that was responsive to the needs of the community. He was soon joined by acclaimed actress, teacher, director and writer Rhodessa Jones as Co-
artistic Director in 1983. Since then, the duo has toured nationally and internationally, visiting various places around the world, using original works as “Art as Social Activism.” The pair have received numerous accolades including the 2016 Theatre Bay Area Legacy Award, Ms. Jones’s appointment as an Arts Envoy by The U.S. Department of State, Educational and Cultural Affairs Bureau and Mr. Ackamoor’s Lifetime Achievement Award presented by Gilles Peterson at the Worldwide Awards in London. They have collaborated with nationally renowned artists such as choreographer Bill T. Jones, the late artist Keith Haring, writers Pearl Cleage and Ntozake Shange, and tenor saxophonist Chico Freeman.

About The Carpetbag Theatre, Inc

The Carpetbag Theatre is a Professional African American Legacy Theater company with a rich history of service to diverse populations. For 47 years, (CBT) has shared history, storytelling, artistic training, performances, and has established partnerships with other organizations that are using “Art as Social Activism.” As an intergenerational ensemble company, our efforts to engage communities of Color and other disenfranchised communities have been constant. An ensemble company both artistically and administratively, CBT works collaboratively to fulfill the mission, to build communities and to develop social capital, emphasizing inclusion and cross-cultural dialogue.

The mission is to give artistic voice to the issues and dreams of people who have been silenced by racism, classism, sexism, ageism, homophobia and other forms of oppression. Finding voice is not simply storytelling; it reveals an individual’s power to make change in their own lives and the lives of their community. The Carpetbag Theatre’s curatorial practice is rooted in these principles, selecting work that exemplifies an aesthetic that is inclusive and meets that standard of excellence.

For more information about The Carpetbag Theatre, call 865-544-0447 or visit www.carpetbagtheatre.org.

This performance is presented in partnership with the Beck Cultural Exchange Center.

The National Performance Network is a group of cultural organizers and artists facilitating the practice and public experience of the performing arts in the United States. NPN serves artists, arts organizers, and a broad range of audiences and communities across the country through commissions, residencies, culture-centers community projects and other artistic activities. For more information: www.npnweb.org.


Art sale at Knoxville Museum of Art

The Guild of the Knoxville Museum of Art presents Artists on Location exhibition and art sale Saturday, April 29, 2017 from 6-8:30pm. This event is free and open to the public.

Local and regional artists have been invited to showcase their talent by producing work out of doors around Knoxville between April 26 and 29. The public is invited to watch as the artists paint around town. (Locations will be listed on knoxart.org in mid-April.) Artists will then exhibit and sell those works at the Awards Reception and Art Sale on Saturday, April 29.

North Carolina Artist Jim Carson is the Featured Artist and Juror for this year’s Artists on Location event. Carson has received a number of awards in both local and national shows, and gives workshops throughout the United States. Carson is known for his creative color balance and bold and expressive brushwork. He is a member of Plein Air Painters of the South East, an associate member of the Oil Painters of America, and a Signature Member of the American Impressionist Society.

Jim Carson, “Flowers in the Hamptons;” image courtesy Knoxville Museum of Art.

The Knoxville Museum of Art celebrates the art and artists of East Tennessee, presents new art and new ideas, serves and educates diverse audiences, and enhances Knoxville’s quality of life. The museum is located in downtown Knoxville at 1050 World’s Fair Park and is open to the public Tuesday through Saturday 10am–5pm, and Sunday 1pm-5pm. Admission and parking are free.

For more information, contact Angela Thomas at 865.934.2034 or visit www.knoxart.org.


Marble Springs to celebrate Arbor Day

In recognition of Arbor Day, Marble Springs Historic Site, 1220 West Governor John Sevier Highway, will host a Tree Planting Celebration on April 8, 2017 starting at 10:00 am. Participants will first learn how to properly plant and label saplings to meet arboretum qualifications as set by the Tennessee Urban Forestry Council. Afterwards, participants can help plant the 60th tree in recognition of Marble Springs reaching a level 2 Arboretum.

Lunch will be provided for those helping plant the celebratory tree and take place at noon. Guest speaker, Tom Simpson, the Region Urban Forester with the Tennessee Department of Agriculture, will provide a lecture on The Importance of Urban Foresty at about 1:00 pm. The Marble Springs Arboretum will be open for self-guided tours throughout the event with a guided tour scheduled at about 2 pm. Children can also participate in Earth Day themed crafts throughout the event.

Please confirm your attendance at info@marblesprings.net or by calling (865) 573-5508. This event is free. Donations are appreciated with all proceeds going towards grounds maintenance and educational programming at Marble Springs.

For more information please visit www.marblesprings.net, call (865) 573-5508, or email info@marblesprings.net.


New works at the Emporium Gallery

The Arts & Culture Alliance is pleased to present five new exhibitions at the Emporium Center in downtown Knoxville from April 7-28, 2017. A public reception will take place on Friday, April 7, from 5:00-9:00 PM to which the public is invited to meet the artists and view the artwork. Most of the works are for sale and may be purchased through the close of the exhibition. The First Friday reception also features jazz music by Vance Thompson & Friends from 7:00-9:00 PM in the Black Box. Complimentary hors d’oeuvres will be available.

Little River Artists in the lower gallery
Little River Art & Frame recently launched an international website selling fine art giclees from originals created by their artists. In addition, Little River owns several collections of 18th and 19th Century bird, botanical and equine prints.

Sharon Gillenwater and Michael McKee: Acrylics and Oils in the Balcony gallery
Raised in a small coal mining community in southern West Virginia, Sharon Gillenwater teaches locally and in her home studio as well as nationally at workshops, seminars and conventions.


In the field of art, Michael McKee (work shown above) is largely self-taught and has cultivated his talents through practice and observation. His subjects of choice are animals and landscapes, and his medium of choice is acrylic. McKee is a native Tennessean and has been a member of the Tennessee Artists Association since 1992. Image submitted.

Connections by Renee Suich in the display case
Renee Suich creates mixed media art including collages inspired by nature, history and the energy. Suich now resides in East Tennessee and enjoys experimenting with new media including encaustic work.

The Enlightened and Lost by Kat Lewis on the North Wall
Kat Lewis is an East Tennessee native who grew up in Andersonville. She studied art at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville as well as Pellissippi State Community College. Her works illustrate dreams, visions and stories of spiritual awakening and enlightenment.

Barbara West Portrait Group in the Atrium
The original art group was formed in 2001 by a wonderful person named Barbara West. When she died, the group decided to continue meeting in her name. Members have come from various parts of the US and other countries, as well as from Tennessee. The exhibition includes work by Sandra Abraham, Sandy Armel, Carrie Ellen Barnes, Debbie Barnes, Beverly Burdette, Shannon Duggan, Nancy Erickson, Barbara Gray, Tony Kampwerth, Steve Romer, Bob Weir, Owen Weston, and others.

The exhibitions are on display at the Emporium Center, 100 S. Gay Street, in downtown Knoxville. Exhibition hours are Monday-Friday, 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Please note, the Emporium will be closed on Friday, April 14, for the holiday. For more information, please contact the Arts & Culture Alliance at (865) 523-7543, or visit the Web site at www.knoxalliance.com.


Norris festival announces music line-up

NORRIS, Tenn. –Headliners for the 38th Annual Tennessee Fall Homecoming, Oct. 6-8, 2017 include multi-award winning country singer, Lee Ann Womack, whose career boasts more than 6 million album sales; The SteelDrivers—fresh off of their 2016 Grammy win for Best Bluegrass Album; and The Earls of Leicester, assembled and led by dobro-master, Jerry Douglas.

Lee Ann Womack is among the headliners for the 38th Annual Tennessee Fall Homecoming, Oct. 6-8, 2017. The event takes place at the Museum of Appalachia, 2819 Andersonville Hwy, in Norris, Tennessee.

“We consider it an honor to share Appalachian music and culture with today’s generations,” says Elaine Meyer, President of the Museum of Appalachia. “We are especially pleased to present such incredible artists as Lee Ann Womack, the SteelDrivers, and the Earls of Leicester for the 38th anniversary of our beloved event.”

Many festival favorites will be returning to the Homecoming stage, such as Doyle Lawson & Quicksilver, Chris Jones and the Night Drivers, Flashback, Steve Gulley & New Pinnacle, and Leroy Troy.

Homecoming will also feature such talented performers as Jimbo Whaley & Greenbrier, Jeff Brown & Still Lonesome, Dale Jett & Hello Stranger, Bill & the Belles, The Ransom Notes,The Wayfarers, Carolina Express, Grassically Trained, and the Stewart Family.

This year, Homecoming expands and enhances its festival with evening concerts by award- winning artists, while continuing to offer 3 days full of music, traditional Appalachian demonstrations, and heritage arts. Student Heritage Day kicks off the festival on the morning of October 6th. An all-new Family Day will be held on Sunday, October 8th, and will feature local artists, games, storytelling, and activities for kids.


McClung Museum hosts ‘Mr. Mummy’

KNOXVILLE—The McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, will host Dr. Bob Brier, one of the world’s foremost experts on mummies and Egyptology, to lecture on ancient Egyptian mummification processes on February 21, 2017 at 7:30 p.m.

The lecture, which is organized by The East Tennessee Society of the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) and the McClung Museum, reveals why the ancient Egyptian mummified and then goes on to describe a modern mummification.

Dr. Bob Brier, known as ‘Mr. Mummy,’ worked with Ronald Wade in 1994 to become the first people in 2,000 years to mummify a human cadaver in the ancient Egyptian style, using ancient tools and materials. The goal of the project was to learn more about the tools and surgical procedures used by ancient embalmers.

Brier and Wade went to Egypt to obtain natron, the dehydrating agent used by the ancient embalmers and also obtained frankincense and myrrh, just as the Egyptians did. Working at the University of Maryland Medical School, the two researchers used replicas of ancient tools to remove the brain through the nose and the internal organs through a three-inch abdominal incision. The project was the subject of a National Geographic television documentary

The lecture is part of exhibition-related programming for Divine Felines: Cats of Ancient Egypt, which runs at McClung Museum through May 7, 2017. The exhibition, which is organized by the Brooklyn Museum, explores the role of cats, lions, and other feline creatures in Egyptian mythology, kingship, and everyday life through nearly eighty different representations of cats from the Brooklyn Museum’s world-famous Egyptian collection.

The McClung Museum is located at 1327 Circle Park Drive. Museum admission is free, and the museum’s hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to Saturday and 1 to 5 p.m. on Sundays. Free two-hour museum parking passes are available from the parking kiosk at the entrance to Circle Park Drive during the week. Free parking is available on the weekends. Free public transportation to the museum is available via the Knoxville Trolley Vol Line.


Open House at Lloyd Branson home

Knoxville, TN – Knox Heritage will be hosting an open house at the recently renovated Branson House, former residence of acclaimed Knoxville artist Enoch Lloyd Branson, on Saturday, February 18, 2017 from 10AM to 2PM. The house is located at 1423 Branson Avenue in North Knoxville.

Built in 1922, the culturally significant Lloyd Branson House had been declared blighted by the City of Knoxville and included in the annual Knox Heritage Fragile Fifteen list of endangered historic places. After an initial design concept by Brian Pittman and two-year renovation by High Oaks Construction, the three bedroom, three bath house is ready for its new homeowners.

The renovation of the historic house was made possible by generous grants and donations from 1772 Foundation, City of Knoxville Preservation Fund, The Lloyd Branson Family, Chapman Family Foundation, Valspar and the National Trust for Historic Preservation, Scripps/HGTV, Modern Supply, Ferguson Plumbing, Knox Heritage Vintage Properties Committee and SESCO Lighting.

Knox Heritage was able to purchase the home through the City of Knoxville’s Homemaker program which seeks buyers for properties needing significant renovation. Initial funding came through the organization’s J. Allen Smith Endangered Properties Fund.

For more information about this event visit www.knoxheritage.org.

About Lloyd Branson

Enoch Lloyd Branson (1853–1925) was best known for his portraits of Southern politicians and depictions of early East Tennessee history. One of the most influential figures in Knoxville’s early art circles, Mr. Branson was a mentor to fellow Knoxville artist Catherine Wiley and is credited with discovering twentieth-century portraitist Beauford Delaney. He operated a popular portrait shop with photographer Frank McCrary on Gay Street and is responsible for the development of the neighborhood in which this home is located, serving as the planner and builder for many homes on the street. Originally named Rhode Island Avenue, the street name was changed to Branson Avenue by the City of Knoxville to recognize his cultural contributions.

About Knox Heritage

Knox Heritage works to preserve the structures and places with historic or cultural significance in Knox County, Tennessee. Established in 1974 as a non-profit historic preservation organization, Knox Heritage is chartered by the state of Tennessee and governed by a board of directors representing all areas of our community. Knox Heritage is the only organization in the region that works every day to protect our treasured structures and places. Without Knox Heritage, many of our important buildings, along with the history and charm of the area, would have been demolished.

Knox Heritage carries out its mission through a variety of programs and encourages community support through education and advocacy. Membership in the organization is by annual dues, which are tax deductible, and is open to all individuals, businesses, and organizations recognizing the foresight of historical preservation.


Auditions for TSC Shakespeare

The Tennessee Stage Company will hold auditions for the 2017 Shakespeare On The Square season on Saturday, March 4, from 1:00 – 3:00 pm and Sunday. March 5, from 1:00 – 4:00 pm at the Emporium Building, 100 S. Gay Street.

Auditionees for Shakespeare on the Square are requested to prepare two contrasting monologues, at least one classical, of no more than one minute each. Please bring two copies of a resume and standard theatrical headshot. All auditions are by appointment only. Photo by CelebrateKnoxville.com.

For appointments please contact the Tennessee Stage Company by calling 546-4280 or by e-mail at tennesseestage@comcast.net.

The two shows to be performed this summer are The Two Gentlemen Of Verona and The Complete Works Of William Shakespeare (Abridged). They will run from July 13 – August 13, 2017. Rehearsals will begin the end of May.

For more information contact Tennessee Stage Company at 546-4280 or visit www.tennesseestage.com.


New works displayed at Emporium

The Arts & Culture Alliance is pleased to present five new exhibitions at the Emporium Center in downtown Knoxville from March 3-31, 2017. A public reception will take place on Friday, March 3, from 5:00-9:00 PM to which the public is invited to meet the artists and view the artwork. Most of the works are for sale and may be purchased through the close of the exhibition. The First Friday reception also features music and dance by Pasion Flamenca from 6:00-6:30 PM and live music by Swing Serenade from 7:00-9:00 PM. Complimentary hors d’oeuvres will be available.

Abingdon Arts Depot – Juried Members Exhibition in the lower gallery
The Arts & Culture Alliance is pleased to present a new exhibition of mixed media works by 27 members of the Depot Artists Association in Abingdon, Virginia.

Image: Jose Roberto: The Art of Surrealism in the Balcony gallery
“When I was a little boy, I put my hand in a meat grinder and lost most of my left arm,” says artist Jose Roberto. That was the beginning of his life as an artist.

“The loneliness and isolation I experienced during childhood now allow me to delve into the deepest realms of my emotions and release them at will onto the image,” Roberto says. “My subjects are usually emotionally-charged themes brought about by my own life experiences.”

The exhibit also includes new work by Coral Grace Turner in the display case; “New Beginning” by Joe Bracco on the North Wall; and Vintage Re-Inventions: Steampunk Creations by Eric Holstine, Jason Lambert, and Jason Edwards in the Atrium.

The exhibitions are on display at the Emporium Center, 100 S. Gay Street, in downtown Knoxville. Exhibition hours are Monday-Friday, 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM. For more information, please contact the Arts & Culture Alliance at (865) 523-7543, or visit the Web site at www.knoxalliance.com.


CBT presents The Busy Body

KNOXVILLE, TN – A fast-paced farce packed with memorable characters, “The Busy Body” runs in the Clarence Brown Theatre’s Carousel Theatre February 22 – March 12, 2017. In this comedy, a young woman, her handsome lover, and their friends plot to escape a controlling guardian. Will a nosey nobleman ruin the plan or save the day?

Charlotte Munson as Miranda in the CBT’s “The Busy Body.”  The play was written by Susanna Centlivre in 1709, with adaptations by UT Faculty Misty Anderson and John Sipes. Photo Liz Aaron.

A Pay What You Wish Preview performance, where patrons can name their own price, will be held Wednesday, February 22 from Noon to 7 pm at the theatre. A Talk Back with the actors will take place Sunday, March 5 following the matinee. A panel discussion in association with the Commission for Women will take place on March 9 at 3:30 pm in the Carousel Theatre. The Open Captioned performance is Sunday, March 12 at 2:00 pm.

According to Restoration scholar Anderson, Centlivre’s comedy was the most popular play written by a woman in the eighteenth century and among the 10 most popular plays of the entire period. Audiences in Charleston, Williamsburg, Baltimore, New York, and other colonial theatre towns in the early days of America flocked to it. It even played in Havana and Kingston, Jamaica! The play’s pace calls for the kind of physical comedy one might have seen on “The Carol Burnett Show.”

“The Busy Body” gives us a window into the world of marriage at a time when women’s roles were just beginning to change, and playwrights like Centlivre were beginning to see women as equals to men. Manners and codes of conduct required curtsies, bows, and polite forms of address, but marriage contracts were also big business.
The two heroines struggle against arrangements that would turn them into mere goods traded between men using secret identities, tricks, messages in code, and helpful waiting maids. The results are hilarious and surprisingly modern; the young women are frank, spunky, and unstoppable, and their lovers seem to love them all the more for it.

Free and convenient parking is available in the McClung Tower Garage on Volunteer Boulevard.


Ancient Egyptian cats at McClung

KNOXVILLE—The McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, opens the new exhibition “Divine Felines: Cats of Ancient Egypt” on Saturday, Feb. 4, 2017.

From domesticated cats to mythic symbols of divinities, felines played an important role in ancient Egyptian imagery for thousands of years. Now, 80 items from the Egyptian holdings of the Brooklyn Museum will be on view in “Divine Felines” at the museum through May 7, 2017. Stela with the Gods Bes and Tutu, 332-30 B.C.E.. Limestone, Brooklyn Museum. Charles Edwin Wilbour Fund. Image courtesy McClung Museum.

Likely first domesticated in ancient Egypt, cats were revered for their fertility and valued for their ability to protect homes and granaries from vermin. But felines were also associated with royalty and deities. Combining a lion’s body and a king’s head, sphinxes guarded temple entrances and provided protection as temple objects. The ferocious goddess Sakhmet, depicted as a lioness or lion-headed woman, and the goddess Bastet, represented as a cat or a cat-headed woman, together symbolized the duality of feline nature — caring yet dangerous. The male leonine gods Bes and Tutu were popularly worshiped as protectors of fertility, health and fortune.

Exhibition programming, all free and open to the public, also will include:

A lecture on mummification in ancient Egypt by scholar Bob Brier, co-sponsored by the East Tennessee Society of the Archaeological Institute of America, at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 21.

Two free family fun days—”Purrs from the Past,” 1–4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 25, and “To Kitties’ Health,” 1­–4 p.m. Saturday, March 25.

A stroller tour for caregivers and infants through four-year-olds, “Kitties and Toddlers,” at 10 a.m. Monday, Feb. 27.

A lecture on cat behavior by Julie Albright from UT’s School of Veterinary Medicine at 2 p.m. Sunday, March 19.
“Divine Felines” is organized by the Brooklyn Museum and Yekaterina Barbash, associate curator of Egyptian Art at the Brooklyn Museum.

The exhibition is presented by the Elaine A. Evans Museum Fund, Aletha and Clayton Brodine Museum Fund, the First Tennessee Foundation, UT Ready for the World, Audrey Duncan, Wahid and Samia Hanna, the Archaeological Institute of America, the UT College of Veterinary Medicine and the Arab American Club of Knoxville. Additional support is provided by Knox County, the City of Knoxville, and the Arts and Heritage Fund.

The McClung Museum is at 1327 Circle Park Drive. Museum admission is free, and the museum’s hours are 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Monday to Saturday and 1–5 p.m. Sundays. Groups may schedule tours by calling 865-974-2144 or emailing museum@utk.edu. Free two-hour museum parking passes are available from the parking information building at the entrance to Circle Park Drive on weekdays by request. Free parking is available on Circle Park Drive on a first-come, first-served basis on weekends. Free public transportation to the museum is also available via the Knoxville Trolley Vol Line.


Poet reads in Library Series

Poet LeAnne Howe will read on Monday, February 6, 2017, on the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, campus as part of the Writers in the Library reading series. The mission of Writers in the Library is to “showcase the work of novelists, poets, and other literary craftsmen.” Some of the best voices on the literary scene today are invited to read.

The reading at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of the John C. Hodges Library is free and open to the public; all are encouraged to attend.

LeAnne Howe, the Eidson Distinguished Professor at the University of Georgia, connects literature, Indigenous knowledge, Native histories, and expressive cultures in her work. Her interests include Native and indigenous literatures, performance studies, film, and Indigeneity. Professor Howe (Choctaw) is the recipient of a United States Artists (USA) Ford Fellowship, Lifetime Achievement Award by the Native Writers’ Circle of the Americas, American Book Award, and an Oklahoma Book Award, and she was a Fulbright Distinguished Scholar to Jordan.  In October 2015, Howe received the Distinguished Achievement Award from the Western Literature Association, (WLA); and in 2014 she received the Modern Languages Association inaugural Prize for Studies in Native American Literatures, Cultures, and Languages for Choctalking on Other Realities.

Her books include Shell Shaker (2001), Evidence of Red (2005), Miko Kings: An Indian Baseball Story (2007), as well as Choctalking on Other Realities (2013). She co-edited a book of essays on Native films with Harvey Markowitz and Denise K. Cummings titled Seeing Red, Pixeled Skins: American Indians and Film (2013). Howe’s most recent essay appears in a special issue of Studies in American Indian Literature (SAIL), Vol. 26, Number 2, Summer 2014, an exploration by scholars on her literary concept of Tribalography. Currently, she’s at work on a new play and a book of poems, Savage Conversations, about Mary Todd Lincoln and a Savage Indian she said tortured her each night in an insane asylum in Batavia, Illinois, in the summer of 1875.

Writers in the Library is sponsored by the UT Libraries and the Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund. For more information, contact Erin Elizabeth Smith, Jack E. Reese Writer-in-Residence at the UT Libraries, at esmith83@utk.edu.

 

 


KMA presents Virtual Views exhibit

The Knoxville Museum of Art announces an exciting new exhibition, Virtual Views: Digital Art from the Thoma Foundation, running February 3 through April 16, 2017. This electronic media exhibition is presented in conjunction with the 2017 Big Ears music festival.

Drawn from the extensive Chicago-based collection of Carl and Marilynn Thoma, Virtual Views explores the growing importance of electronic new media in contemporary art as seen in the work of artists who are pioneers in the use of LEDs (light-emitting diodes), LCD (liquid crystal display), and computer-driven imagery. The exhibition features nine electronic works comprised of synthetic materials and powered by digital technology, yet the rhythms and patterns of its imagery are derived from nature. The featured artists include Jim Campbell, Craig Dorety, John Gerrard, Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, Alan Rath, Daniel Rozin, Björn Schülke, Jennifer Steinkamp, and Leo Villareal.

Craig Dorety (Oakland 1973; lives and works in San Francisco) Offset Circles—Yellow Flowering Tree Against Blue Sky, 2014, custom electronics, alupanel, animated LEDs, 24 x 24 x 3 inches.

The Knoxville Museum of Art celebrates the art and artists of East Tennessee, presents new art and new ideas, serves and educates diverse audiences, and enhances Knoxville’s quality of life. The museum is located in downtown Knoxville at 1050 World’s Fair Park and is open to the public Tuesday through Saturday 10am–5pm, and Sunday 1pm-5pm. Admission and parking are free. For more information, contact Angela Thomas at 865.934.2034 or visit www.knoxart.org.


Found Objects at TN Stage Company

Does the truth always set us free? When a mother and daughter attempt to deal with the accidental death of their son/brother, the truth may indeed stand in the way of their healing. Those are the questions raised when the Tennessee Stage Company presents its 20th Annual New Play Festival and World Premiere Production of Marilynn Barner Anselmi’s play, Found Objects.

Marilynn Barner Anselmi says she is an accidental southerner and playwright. Born in Holt, Michigan, after close to three decades in North Carolina, she has almost attained the status of southerner. She has full length and a handful of short scripts which have been presented in fourteen states across the country. Performances include MT Works, Pride Films and Plays, Detroit Repertory Theatre, Kennedy’s Theatre, The Studio Theatre, Atta Girl Productions, Script2Stage2Screen, National Black Theatre Conference, and Tennessee Stage Company, among others.

Performances are February 3-12, 2017, at 8 p.m. at the Historic Southern Railway Station. There will be matinee performances Sunday afternoons at 3:00 pm.

Tickets are on sale now. Call (865) 546-4280 for tickets and reservations.

General Admission is $15.00

The New Play Festival is made possible in part by the support of the Tennessee Arts Commission and the Arts and Culture Alliance and is a proud participant in the Penny For The Arts Program.


New voices at Knoxville Writers Guild

The Knoxville Writer’s Guild’s Thursday, February 2, 2017 program, “Bold New Voices,” features three electrifying, socially and politically engaged young poets and performing artists at the Fellowship Hall of Central United Methodist Church, 201 S. Third Avenue, Knoxville, starting at 7 p.m.

Rhea Carmon is a mathematician, poet, singer, youth mentor and creator of the powerful Fifth Woman group, inspiring women to “step on stage and bare their souls in front of an audience.” Her monthly reggae-inspired poetry slams excite and nurture scores of young poets. Photo courtesy Knoxville Writers Guild.

Jeb Herrin brings his dramatic experience as a medic in Iraq to his work in the MFA program at the University of Tennessee. His work takes us deep into the soldier’s journey from training to deployment, and then back to civilian world, where another battle for survival begins.

Ben McClendon’s work is widely published, exploring ecology, politics, and the power of queer love in an age of profound environmental risk. Poetry, he says, “is well situated to explore, celebrate, and inquire into all things ecological because its tradition has always been to explore the human, and through us the world.”

Knoxville Writers Guild meetings are open to the public. A $2 donation is requested at the door.


Puppet group awarded art grant

Cattywampus Puppet Council has been awarded a prestigious Burning Man Global Art Grant to help produce the Appalachian Puppet Pageant as part of the Knoxville, Tennessee 2017 Dogwood Arts Festival. The Pageant will take place on Saturday, April 29, 2017 and preparations are already underway.

The Appalachian Puppet Pageant is an East Tennessee inspired community puppet parade. It will bring together members of all ages and backgrounds to celebrate the ecology and culture of the region through visual and performance art, and feature puppets up to 12 feet tall. Community members will craft individual and collaborative pieces, and create a living, breathing art exhibit in the streets of Knoxville. Participation in the parade is free and open to people of all ages.

To prepare for the Appalachian Puppet Pageant, Cattywampus is holding a series of free workshops on giant puppet construction, and interest has been so overwhelming that the first two have reached capacity. An additional workshop has been added for March 9, 2017 at the Muse Knoxville for interested individuals and community groups. Resources for learning how to build giant puppets for the parade can also be found on the Cattywampus Puppet Council website. The group is also looking for volunteers for the day of the parade, as well as donations of supplies and financial support.

Cattywampus Puppet Council was founded in 2014 by local artists Rachel Milford and Shelagh Leutwiler. They are a registered non-profit corporation in the state of Tennessee and are fiscally sponsored through Community Shares. The mission of Cattywampus is to build community and promote play through the puppetry arts. They do this through creating original shows, workshops, and puppet parades, involving members of the community of all ages and backgrounds. Their goal is to foster dialogue, laughter, wonder, and healing along the way.

More information about Cattywampus is available at www.cattywampuspuppetcouncil.com.


Sprecher art on display at KMA

The Knoxville Museum of Art announces a new contemporary exhibition, Outside In, by Jered Sprecher from January 27 through April 16, 2017.

Sprecher lives in Knoxville and is a professor with the University of Tennessee’s School of Art. He enjoys a growing national reputation as one of the leading representative of a generation of contemporary painters dedicated to the exploration and revitalization of abstraction. He describes himself as a “hunter and gatherer,” pulling his imagery from such disparate sources as wallpaper, graffiti, architecture, cut gemstones, and x-rays.

Outside In reflects the dynamic range of Sprecher’s recent practice in terms of format, scale, imagery, and process. It also includes several new works configured in a provocatively informal manner designed to reference a space that is central to human domestic life since the dawn of time: the living room. The Study (2013), for instance, depicts an abstracted frontal view of a fireplace entrance defined in broad horizontal strokes in an icy palette that presents the original image in a strange new light. The painting reflects the artist’s examination of parallels between ancient domestic traditions in which the fireplace was a mesmerizing light environment that in contemporary life has been replaced by the ubiquitous digital screen.

Jered Sprecher, “Trees Walking”, 2015. Oil on linen, 72 x 60 inches.

The Knoxville Museum of Art celebrates the art and artists of East Tennessee, presents new art and new ideas, serves and educates diverse audiences, and enhances Knoxville’s quality of life. The museum is located in downtown Knoxville at 1050 World’s Fair Park and is open to the public Tuesday through Saturday 10am–5pm, and Sunday 1pm-5pm. Admission and parking are free. For more information, contact Angela Thomas at 865.934.2034 or visit www.knoxart.org.


Knoxville Winter Farmers’ Market begins

KNOXVILLE – Nourish Knoxville will open the Winter Farmers’ Market for its fourth season on January 14, 2017. Patrons can shop from a host of farms selling locally grown produce, meat, eggs, honey, herbs, plants, and more, along with artisan food and craft producers with baked goods, prepared foods, and handcrafted items. Food trucks will be stationed in the parking lot to provide brunch and locally roasted coffee.

As part of opening day, Nourish Knoxville will kick off the Power of Produce (PoP) Club. A nationwide program that actively engages children in healthy eating, PoP Clubs give children the opportunity to become an active part of their local food economy by empowering them to make their own food choices with their PoP Bucks. All children participating in the activity of the day receive PoP Bucks to spend on fresh fruits and vegetables or food producing plants. Any children visiting the WFM are invited to participate in the day’s activity, or join the PoP Club to participate season long, track their progress with their own PoP Passport, and receive prizes for completing multiple activities. With a curriculum created by the Knox County Health Department, PoP Club promises to be a fun and educational child-centered piece of the Winter Farmers’ Market. The PoP Club at the Winter Farmers’ Market is sponsored by OliBea, a restaurant with a commitment to purchasing local ingredients from farms in the East Tennessee region.

The Winter Farmers’ Market will also provide the Fre$h Savings program, a SNAP matching program that allows SNAP recipients to buy more fresh fruits and vegetables at farmers’ markets. For every $20 of SNAP/EBT spent, SNAP customers will receive an additional $20 to use at market on fresh produce. Fre$h Savings is made possible by the AARP Foundation and Wholesome Wave Foundation, and is available at farmers’ markets across Tennessee.

The Winter Farmers’ Market happens every other Saturday, January through April. Along with invaluable programs like PoP Club and Fre$h Savings, the WFM will offer special events throughout the season, such as monthly cooking classes with nutrition cooking master Katie Dodson. These classes will cover topics like meal planning, quick dinners from healthy ingredients, and tweaking healthy diets to maximize pleasurable eating. For more information about these and other events, visit our website at nourishknoxville.org.

Nourish Knoxville is a 501(c)(3) non-profit working to cultivate and support relationships between farmers, artisanal producers, and the community through outreach, education, and advocacy, and to build healthy communities through connections to local food. NK operates the Market Square Farmers’ Market, Market Square Holiday Market, and Winter Farmers’ Market in Knoxville, Tennessee, and publishes the annual East Tennessee Local Food Guide, a free publication connecting the East Tennessee community to local food.


Poet Joy Harjo reads at UT

Internationally recognized poet, author, musician, and playwright Joy Harjo will read from her work on the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, campus as part of the Writers in the Library reading series. Harjo’s reading on Monday, January 23, 2017 will take place in the John C. Hodges Library auditorium at 7 p.m. The reading is free and open to the public.

Joy Harjo is the author of fourteen books, including eight books of poetry and two chapbooks. Her most recent book of poems, Conflict Resolution with Holy Beings (W.W. Norton, 2015) won the Wallace Stevens Award for Lifetime Achievement from the Academy of American Poets. Other well-known volumes of poetry include How We Became Human: New and Selected Poems, The Woman Who Fell from the Sky, In Mad Love and War, and She Had Some Horses. A few of her many honors include a Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship, the New Mexico Governor’s Award for Excellence in the Arts, the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Native Writers Circle of the Americas, and the William Carlos Williams Award from the Poetry Society of America. For A Girl Becoming, a young adult/coming-of-age book, was released in 2009.

Harjo is currently working on a play, Wings of Night Sky, Wings of Morning Light, forthcoming from Wesleyan University, and Song Lines of Justice, a historical memoir, for W. W. Norton. Her musical play, “We Were There When Jazz Was Born,” has been commissioned by the New York Public Theater. Harjo has released five award-winning CDs of original music and in 2009 won a Native American Music Award (NAMMY) for Best Female Artist of the Year for Winding Through the Milky Way. Her most recent CD release is a traditional flute album, Red Dreams, A Trail Beyond Tears. She performs nationally and internationally with her band, the Arrow Dynamics. She has received a Rasmuson US Artists Fellowship and is a founding board member of the Native Arts and Cultures Foundation. Harjo writes a column, “Comings and Goings,” for her tribal newspaper, the Muscogee Nation News.

Harjo was appointed to a Chair of Excellence in Creative Writing at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, in 2016. She brings to the Creative Writing Program and to the university expertise in Native American studies, as well as distinction in poetry, creative non-fiction, drama, children’s books, and music. Her public service is as extensive as her publications. Currently she is co-judging the 2015 National Book Award in poetry.

Writers in the Library is sponsored by the UT Libraries and the Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund. For more information, contact Erin Elizabeth Smith, Jack E. Reese Writer-in-Residence at the UT Libraries, at esmith83@utk.edu.


Call for artists: Arts in the Airport

The Arts & Culture Alliance of Greater Knoxville and the Metropolitan Knoxville Airport Authority (McGhee Tyson Airport) announce a call for entries for the 17th Arts in the Airport, a juried exhibition developed to allow regional artists to compete and display work in the most visited site in the area.

Approximately 40-45 fine art works encompassing all styles and genres from both emerging and established artists will comprise the exhibition in the secured area behind McGhee Tyson Airport’s security gate checkpoint from April 27 – October 18, 2017.

The deadline for entries to be received is Sunday, March 12, 2017.

Prizes include at least $1,000 in cash awards.

Artists may view the information, complete the entry form, and/or download an application at www.knoxalliance.com/airport-entry/.

The call for entries is open to all artists 18 years and older residing in the 33 counties of East Tennessee. Each artist may submit up to five entries which must be original works in the following categories: 2-D (painting, drawing, mixed media, printmaking, photography) and 3-D (sculpture of all media). The nonrefundable entry fee is $30 for up to five works (free for Arts & Culture Alliance members). The $30 entry fee includes a six-month membership in the Arts & Culture Alliance.

About the juror: Terri Jordan has been working in and with the arts for more than 20 years. She is the exhibits curator of the Customs House Museum in Clarksville, Tennessee, as well as a fine artist working in oils and acrylics. Ms. Jordan has been involved with nonprofit arts organizations, sitting on the Board of Directors for the Mid-Cumberland Arts League and the Tennessee Art League. Her narrative figurative paintings have been exhibited in group and solo shows throughout the country. She has won numerous awards for her paintings and is in collections from New York to California, Italy and England.


The current Arts in the Airport exhibition features the work of 40 artists in the East Tennessee region. Image: “Spring Morning, John Messer Cantilever Barn” (Oil on linen) by Mike Gaylon.


Dogwood Arts features Glass Guys

On January 13, 2017, Dogwood Arts First Friday will feature artworks created by the talented Glass Guys who call Knoxville and East Tennessee region home. Featured artists include: Richard Jolley, Tommie Rush, Matthew Cummings, Matt Salley, Johnny Glass, Thomas Spake, Everett Hirche, Tyler Olson, David Wiss, Samuel Meketon, Curt Brock, and Christopher Mosey.

Dogwood Arts’ First Friday events and exhibitions highlight 18 unique programs and support the creativity of local and regional artists. This event was originally scheduled for January 6, but postponed to January 13 due to inclement weather.

Doors are open 5:30-8:30pm at the new Dogwood Arts office located at 123 W. Jackson Ave in Downtown Knoxville’s Historic Old City.


WDVX show takes winter break

The WDVX Blue Plate Special, a popular downtown Knoxville attraction for nearly 12 years, is going on hiatus while the Knoxville Visitor Center undergoes a facelift. Kicking off its “20 Years on the Air” celebration, WDVX will be taking the live radio broadcast out to various locations in the area with show host Red Hickey and performances by local and touring artists.

The first show is scheduled for Friday, January 13, 2017 at the Open Chord, ​8502 Kingston Pike, Knoxville, TN, featuring The Lonetones and the South Carolina Broadcasters. Other venues slated to be visited by the Blue Plate Special production are the Clayton Center on the Maryville College campus, Pellissippi State Community College, and the Grove Theatre in Oak Ridge. Details about upcoming shows and performers will be available on WDVX.com. As with the daily Blue Plate Special, whose last show of the year is Saturday, December 31, every road show will be free to attend. The WDVX Blue Plate Special Road Shows will continue through February. The Visitor Center is expected to celebrate with a grand reopening on Friday, March 2, 2017.

WDVX, a non-commercial listener supported radio station, plays a mix of American roots music including Bluegrass, blues, Alt-County, classic Country, old-time, Swing, Rockabilly, and more. Yet the Blue Plate Special regularly steps beyond that framework by presenting classical, jazz, theatrical, and international artists; sometimes on the same show as singer/songwriters, bluegrass, and country performers. More than 20,000 people attend the Blue Plate Special each year to see more than 1600 artists perform.

WDVX is a service of non-profit organization Cumberland Communities Communications Corporation. Its broadcast on 89.9 FM reaches eleven counties in East Tennessee and Southeast Kentucky, on 102.9 in downtown Knoxville, and 93.9 in the Seymour and Kodak areas, and streams lives on WDVX.com.


Art classes offered in Norris

Appalachian Arts Craft Center in Norris will be offering the following classes in January 2017: Landscape Painting with Sherry Smith, Dichoric Pendant with Donna Gryder, Pottery on the Wheel with Sandra McEntire, Handbuilding with Judy Brater, and Nuno Felted Scarf with Tone Haugen-Cogburn.

LANDSCAPE PAINTING, with Sherry Smith, Thursday, January 5, 12, 19, 26 and Feb 2 & 9, 6:00 – 9:00 p.m.
Have you ever wanted to paint a beautiful landscape, but didn’t think you could? Everyone can learn to paint! In these classes, students will explore the skills needed to create beautiful paintings.

DICHORIC PENDANT WORKSHOP, with Donna Gryder, Saturday, January 14, 1:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Nothing says fusing like the bling of dichroic glass. Here’s your chance to experience the sparkles and colors that only dichroic glass can offer. Each participant will make their own wearable masterpieces, in the form of up to 4 glass pendants, using a variety of fusible glass. Basic glass fusing information will be discussed. Pendants will be designed, cut and pieced together during class. The firing of the pendants will take place during the next few days, away from the Center.

POTTERY ON THE WHEEL, with Sandra McEntire, Monday, January 23, 30 and February 6, 13, 10:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. This will be a class that will concentrate on and review the four basics of wheel work: centering, opening, pulling up, and trimming. It will give the student more confidence in the throwing process. There will be four classes. Some wheel ability helpful but not required.

HANDBUILDING WORKSHOP, with Judy Brater, Two Fridays, January 27 and March 3, 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Judy Brater will be teaching a class that shows how to alter bowls and vases by adding coils, and how to texture them using a variety of pottery stamps and tools. Bring three leather hard formed bowls, any size or shape and one vase shaped vessel. Also bring any texturing tools, towels, extra clay needed for coils and altering forms.

NUNO FELTED SCARF WORKSHOP, with Tone Haugen-Cogburn, Saturday, January 28, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. See how silk fabric and wool rowing merge to make a colorful nuno felted scarf. Soap, water, bubblewrap and your two hands are simple tools you will use for this wet felting technique. All artist skill levels are welcome.

For additional information call 865-494-9854 or visit www.applachianarts.net.


Knox Civic hosts 90s Tour

Following early sold out shows and mounting demand from fans, “I LOVE THE ‘90s TOUR” has added more tour dates, including a performance in Knoxville. The once-in- a-lifetime lineup comes together for a nostalgia-driven blast from the past and now comes to the Knoxville Civic Coliseum on Thursday, April 6, 2017, at 7:30 p.m.

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The inaugural edition of “I Love The ‘90s Tour” invites Knoxville fans to reminisce about the trend-setting decade with some of the most iconic, indelible names in rap, hip hop and R&B, featuring Salt N Pepa, All 4 One, Coolio, Tone LOC, Color Me Badd, Rob Base and Young MC.

The Kansas City Star describes this 90s tour: “It was a satellite radio station come to life. It was the ultimate Throwback Thursday. It was a dance party filled with joyous Gen-Xers doing the ‘Funky Cold Medina’; in a ‘Gangsta’s Paradise’; and showing they could still ‘Push It, Push it real good.’ The crowd included many groups of girlfriends, some dressed up in era-appropriate overalls, neon shoes, gold chains and caps turned backward. They danced and screamed when they heard songs they recognized, and they heard many songs they recognized. -Kansas City Star

The Knoxville Civic Auditorium and Coliseum is conveniently located near the junction of Interstates 75 and 40 and sits downtown near the University of Tennessee campus. The facility attracts more than 250,000 people per year through a wide array of events, including Knoxville Ice Bears hockey games and the Knoxville Symphony Orchestra Pops Series. The facility includes a 6,500-capacity coliseum with 22,000-square- feet of exhibit space; 2,500-capacity auditorium; 10,000-square- foot exhibit hall; 4,800-square- foot ballroom; and a natural lawn amphitheater with a capacity of 10,000.

Tickets are now on sale at the Knoxville Civic Coliseum box office, charge by phone by calling 865-656- 4444 or 877-995- 9961 or online at KnoxvilleTickets.com. Reserved seating is $40, $55, $70 and $100. Applicable fees may apply.


New exhibits at The Emporium

The Arts & Culture Alliance is pleased to present three new exhibitions at the Emporium Center in downtown Knoxville from January 6-27, 2017. A public reception will take place on Friday, January 6, from 5:00-9:00 PM to which the public is invited to meet the artists and view the artwork. Most of the works are for sale and may be purchased through the close of the exhibition. Complimentary hors d’oeuvres will be available.

The O’Connor Senior Center Painters present a new exhibition of more than 40 watercolors, oils, and acrylics entitled “Breaking Ground – What You Want to See” featuring more than ten artists.

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Members of the Appalachian Area Chapter of Blacksmiths are pleased to present an exhibition of fine, hand-forged architectural ironwork. Photo courtesy artist blacksmith Joe Babb.

The exhibition will include a variety of items for the home including gates, grills, sculpture, furniture, lighting, fireplace equipment, and door hardware. The show will be of interest to the general public as well as interior designers, architects, and artists. Artist Blacksmiths include Joe Babb, Ron Nichols, Brad Greenwood, Ron Nichols, Mike Rose, and others.

With a goal of preserving and promoting the exciting art of blacksmithing, the Appalachian Area Chapter of Blacksmiths strives to educate and involve both men and women, young and old. AACB was founded in 1965 by Jud Nelson, Joe Humble, Joe Neely, A.P. Billingsley, and Bill Planzer. It is a nonprofit organization and an affiliate of the Artist-Blacksmith’s Association of North America.

The MLK Gallery of Arts Tribute will kick-off the 2017 King Week Celebration. The Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemorative Commission is partnering with the Arts & Culture Alliance of Greater Knoxville to provide this annual exhibition. The Galley of Arts Tribute is a juried exhibition developed to recognize local artists and most importantly to honor the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The exhibit will feature works by local artists reflecting the themes of Unity, Community, Love, Racial Reconciliation, Social Justice, and Civil Rights.

The exhibitions are on display at the Emporium Center, 100 S. Gay Street, in downtown Knoxville. Exhibition hours are Monday-Friday, 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Please note, the Emporium is closed January 16 for the holiday.

For more information, please contact the Arts & Culture Alliance at (865) 523-7543, or visit the Web site at www.knoxalliance.com.


Knoxville store Rala expanding

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. – Knoxville gifts store Rala announces that it is expanding and moving to one of the commercial spaces at The Daniel in the Spring of 2017. The business, currently located at 323 Union Avenue, will open at its new location at 112 W. Jackson Avenue on Friday, March 3, 2017.

Owner Nanci Solomon says “We are thrilled to announce our expansion and move to the vibrant arts district of downtown Knoxville. After finding out that our lease would not be renewed in our current location, we looked around for a new space and found the perfect fit at the recently renovated John H. Daniel Building. The larger space will allow us to hold events, add contemporary home goods and accessories, expand our greeting card selection and feature more original art. We look forward to joining our new neighbors in the burgeoning Old City area just in time for the celebration of art on First Friday in March.”

Solomon is working with local artist and architect, Brian Pittman, of Johnson Architecture, Inc to design Rala’s new space. The Daniel partners, Ron Turner and Jon Clark, will manage the build out.

Rala opened in 2010 as a place where Knoxville could show off its rich community of artists and makers. They provide a venue for modern goods and gifts made with love by artists from around the corner and across the world.

Rala will remain open at their current location at 323 Union Avenue until the end of February 2017. Hours of operation will remain the same: Monday – Saturday 10 a.m. – 9 p.m. and Sunday 11 a.m -6 p.m.


Lecture offered on TN marble

(Knoxville, TN) “From the Archives: Finding East Tennessee’s Marble Story” is the subject of a lecture to be presented by Dr. Susan W. Knowles, Wednesday, December 7, 2016 at the East Tennessee History Center.

Her interest piqued by Tennessee marble she saw in the United States Capitol, Knowles set out to learn more about marble from the East Tennessee region and its use in buildings and monuments across the nation. The resulting research, images, and interviews became the subject of her doctoral dissertation and now form the basis of a feature exhibition Rock of Ages: East Tennessee’s Marble Industry, of which Knowles is the guest curator.

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East Tennessee marble is prized the world over. The exhibition explores the industry and offers a first-time look into the factors that launched the rock’s fame and crowned Knoxville as the Marble City. The beautiful exhibit features an array of artifacts, videos, and photographs showcasing the importance and diversity of East Tennessee’s marble industry. Lecture attendees are invited to tour the exhibition following the lecture

Susan W. Knowles is a graduate of the Public History program at MTSU, with an M.A. in Art History from Vanderbilt University, and a Master of Library Science degree from George Peabody College. She currently serves as the Digital Humanities Research Fellow for the Center for Historic Preservation at Middle Tennessee State University. Knowles served project curator for “Trials and Triumphs: Tennesseans’ Search for Citizenship, Community, and Opportunity,” a website and digital collection on the “Jim Crow” era in Tennessee. She is currently overseeing the graduate research assistants at MTSU and coordinating building the “Southern Places” online research collections, which document more than thirty years of field work at the Center for Historic Preservation.

The program is sponsored by Consolidated Nuclear Security, LLC and is and free and open to the public. The lecture will begin at noon at the East Tennessee History Center, 601 S. Gay Street, Knoxville. Guests are invited to bring a “Brown Bag” lunch and enjoy the lecture. Soft drinks will be available. For more information on the lecture, exhibitions, or museum hours, call 865-215-8824 or visit the website at www.EastTNHistory.org.


Knox library hosts Indian film

Knox County Public Library is hosting a series of Indian films and will screen Monsoon Wedding on Sunday, December 4, 2016 at 2 p.m.

The film will be shown at Lawson McGhee Library, 500 W. Church Ave. An opportunity to join in discussion about the film will follow afterwards.

Mira Nair’s Monsoon Wedding (2001 – R) is a comedy-drama set in New Delhi and focuses on a father’s expensive preparation for his daughter’s wedding and the chaos that ensues when families arrive and gather together.

Writer Sabrina Dhawan wrote the first draft of the screenplay in a week while she was at Columbia University’s MFA film program. Monsoon Wedding earned just above $30 million at the box office. Although it is set entirely in New Delhi, the film was an international co-production between companies in India, the United States, Italy, France, and Germany.

The film won the Golden Lion award and received a Golden Globe Award nomination. A musical based on the film premiered on Broadway in April 2014. The film was premiered in the Marché du Film section of the 2001 Cannes Film Festival.

This film will be introduced by Viren Lalka of the local cultural group Namaste, Welcome to India.

Parental discretion is advised for this screening and minors must be accompanied by an adult because of the film’s R rating and plot elements that address sexual abuse. The screening is open to the public.

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Concert features Mike Baggetta

The next concert in the Jazz Lunch series will feature a tribute to Ornette Coleman with Mike Baggetta and will take place on Wednesday, December 7, 2016, from noon to 1pm at the Square Room in downtown Knoxville. Admission to the concert is $15 and includes a lunch buffet served up by Café 4. Tickets are available online at http://www.knoxjazz.org or by visiting Café 4 in person prior to the show.

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Drawing from the works of the Free-Jazz pioneer, saxophonist and composer Ornette Coleman, Mike Baggetta has assembled a group of fearless improvisors with whom to reinterpret Coleman’s music with a newfound experimentalism paying tribute to the spirit of its creator. Photo: Knoxville Jazz Orchestra.

Patrons to this Jazz Lunch may expect classic Ornette tunes like Lonely Woman and Ramblin’ next to lesser known masterpieces like What Reason Could I Give and War Orphans, among others. Matt Nelson (bass) and Nolan Nevels (drums) will join Mike Baggetta for this special jazz lunch concert.

Special thanks to East Tennessee PBS, WUOT 91.9 FM, The Square Room, and Weird Monkey Studios for support of the Jazz Lunch Series.

The Square Room is a new, state-of- the-art performance venue in downtown Knoxville, TN in the Historic Market Square district. It is housed in the rear of the 4 Market Square Building along with its counterpart Café 4, a full-service restaurant and coffee bar.


Knoxville writers host potluck supper

Members of the Knoxville Writers’ Guild will share their works and hold a mix and mingle potluck for December’s monthly program. Both current members and the public are encouraged to attend and to bring a covered dish or holiday snack.

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The event will begin at 7 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 1, 2016 at Central United Methodist Church’s Fellowship Hall, 201 E. Third Ave. Attendees should enter off of the large parking lot behind the church. A $2 donation is welcome at the door with free and accessible parking available.

We will also have sales tables provided for KWG members to sell their work.

For those interested in reading, there are a few simple guidelines:

1) You must be a current member of the Knoxville Writers’ Guild. You can join or renew your membership before the readings begin. There will be a sign-up sheet at the door for those taking part to establish speaker order.

2) What you read should be your own work or that of another group member. If it will be the work of another KWG member, you are required to have permission to read his/her work.

3) Your reading time will be three minutes maximum. It’s not necessary that your reading last the full amount of time allotted. For instance, if you have a one-minute poem and don’t have anything else you’d like to read, that would be fine.

4) What you read should be suitable for a general audience. In other words, please show courtesy to those attending. Think of approaching your reading as something to be shared and appreciated by one-and-all.

The Knoxville Writers Guild membership is $30 and $15 for students. Visit www.knoxvillewritersguild.org.


Appalachian Ballet presents The Nutcracker

The Appalachian Ballet Company will present the annual holiday tradition – The Nutcracker in their 45th anniversary season. The production features live music by the Knoxville Symphony Orchestra. The Appalachian Ballet Company will present four public shows December 3rd at 7:30 pm & December 4th, 2016 at 3 pm at the Knoxville Civic Auditorium AND December 9th at 7:30 pm and December 10th at 3 pm at the Clayton Center for the Arts in Maryville. Two school matinees (includes K-8 curriculum guide covering common core standards) will be presented at 10 am at the Knoxville Civic Auditorium on December 1st and 2nd.

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Dancing the role of the Nutcracker Prince for the 45th anniversary season of The Nutcracker with the Appalachian Ballet will be Australian dancer, Aaron Smyth.

This international guest artist will be partnering ballerina Kylie Morton Berry, the Sugarplum Fairy, formerly with North Carolina Dance Theatre. Both audience favorites, Smyth and Berry performed together in the spring of 2015 at the Tennessee Theatre in ABC’s production of Cinderella and in last year’s Nutcracker performance.

This year’s production will include several new pieces of choreography featuring guest artists David Ward from BalletMet as the Snow King and Jeff Wolfe as Herr Drosselmeyer. William Cannon returns from New York to dance the role of the Arabian Prince with Koura Wright as the Princess. New sets, props and costumes will bring the charming and spellbinding production to life.

For over 100 years, this classic story has proven to be a favorite, enchanting audiences of all ages. Come see the magic with lavish scenery, glorious tutus, soldiers, snowflakes and sugar plums at the Knoxville Civic Auditorium or The Clayton Center for the Arts – the first and second weekend of December. For tickets call Knox Tickets 865.656.4444 or Clayton Center 981-8590.


Book celebrates local music

(Knoxville, TN) Knoxville’s Mid-Day Merry-Go-Round and its cast of musicians are the subject of a lecture and book signing by Ruth B. White at the East Tennessee History Center, November 6, 2016. The occasion celebrates the launch of White’s new book, Knoxville’s ‘Merry-Go-Round,’ Ciderville, and the East Tennessee Music Scene.

The noonday show was broadcast live from WNOX for more than twenty years and attracted a loyal and enthusiastic audience. The host of on-air talent include many who went on to Nashville to become country greats, such as Roy Acuff, Chet Atkins, Archie Campbell, Don Gibson, the Carters, Homer and Jethro, and Carl Smith, to only name a few.

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Knoxville’s ‘Merry-Go-Round,’ Ciderville, and the East Tennessee Country Music Scene is a warm, sometimes hilarious, insider’s look back at this early period of country music, the stories behind the lyrics, and the shared laughter, tragedies, and tears of the Merry-Go-Round cast.

Ruth married Harold White in 1965. He had been a steel guitarist on the Merry-Go-Round and was playing with Grand Ole Opry superstar Hank Williams when they met. Together they became an important part of the Nashville music scene, Harold as a musician and “song plugger,” and Ruth in music publishing.
David West and the Cider Mountain Boys will provide a nostalgic look at music popular in the Merry-Go-Round heyday. A banjoist, David played with the Bonnie Lou and Buster Show, then as a regular on the Cas Walker Show until it went off the air. An astute businessman, he is involved in many local enterprises, but his real love is the operation of Ciderville, selling musical instruments and one of the largest Martin Guitar dealers in the country. It also serves as a popular venue for country music performances. Ruth devotes a chapter in her book to David and Ciderville, describing it as a place where “sounds Nashville has forgotten, original sounds of the mountains and rural areas” are still being played.

A foreword by WNTT-AM radio host James Perry introduces the book.

The program at the East Tennessee History Center is from 2:30-4:30 p.m., Sunday, November 6. The event is free and open to the public. The East Tennessee History Center is located at 601 S. Gay Street, Knoxville. For more information on the lecture, exhibitions, or museum hours, call 865-215-8824 or visit the website at www.EastTNHistory.org.


Food fest at World’s Fair Park

Annoor Academy of Knoxville, a local pre-k through eighth grade private school, invites the Knoxville community to its fifteenth annual International Food Festival, on Saturday, Oct. 29, 2016, from 11:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. at the World’s Fair Park Festival Lawn.

The students of Annoor Academy of Knoxville (AAK) represent a wide array of cultural backgrounds. For 15 years, the staff, parents, and volunteers of AAK have celebrated their diversity and cultural roots through an international food festival. This year, for the first time, AAK is bringing the celebration to the heart of Knoxville by hosting its largest ever International Food Festival at the World’s Fair Park this coming Saturday, October 29, from 11 a.m. until 5 p.m.

As event organizer Ghada Ayesh explained, “This event was really born out of a desire to share our unique cultural diversity with the Knoxville community. And what better way to bond with your neighbors than over food!”

The festival will feature food booths set up by volunteers as well as some local restaurants, representing different countries and regions, with an emphasis on the Middle East, South Asia, and North Africa, though other nations will be represented as well. “We will have food ranging from places like Indonesia to Jamaica!” Ayesh explains. In addition to food vendors, there will be a shopping bazaar and a “kids’ corner,” where kids can enjoy bouncing on inflatables, crafts and receive a passport to have stamped as they travel around the country booths. There also will be a rotating schedule of entertainment along with cooking demonstrations throughout the day.

Admission to the event is free of charge. Food tickets can be purchased on site for $1 each, and each vendor will have listed prices (in tickets) for each food item. Children wishing to participate in the “kids’ corner” can have unlimited play time in the inflatables, crafts and a kids’ passport for $5. All profits for the event go toward AAK school operations.

Annoor Academy of Knoxville is a private school serving the Muslim community in the Knoxville, Tennessee area. It was founded in 1998 and currently operates as an accredited preschool through 8th grade school located in West Knoxville. The purpose of the school is to provide children of the Knoxville Community with an excellent education in a safe, secure, religiously sensitive environment. AAK is dedicated to creating a learning environment which encourages all students to become outstanding citizens.

For more information, visit annooracademy.net.


Authors to speak on TN history

Tennessee Technological University professors Calvin Dickinson and Michael Birdwell will discuss their new book People of the Upper Cumberland: Achievements and Contradictions in a Brown Bag Lecture at noon on Wednesday, October 12, 2016. The anthology, recently named the “Tennessee History Book of the Year” by the Tennessee Library Association, presents a complex view of the rich history and culture of the Tennessee-Kentucky Upper Cumberland, an area composed of the 24 counties that mostly border the eastern half of the Cumberland River.
Birdwell and Dickinson will discuss the history of the region, politicians, moonshiners, changing medical practices, women’s roles, race relations, and more. Also featured will be a few of the Upper Cumberland’s most famous residents, Cordell Hull, John Gore, John Catron, Charles Faulkner Bryan, and Champ Ferguson. The book will be available for purchase and signing by Dickinson and Birdwell following the lecture.

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Dr. Michael E. Birdwell is a professor of history at Tennessee Technological University and the author of several books, including Celluloid Soldiers: Warner Brothers Campaign against Nazism and Rural Life and Culture of the Upper Cumberland. Birdwell also serves as the chair of the Tennessee Great Wars Commission. Dr. W. Calvin Dickinson is a professor emeritus of history at Tennessee Technological University. He currently serves on the Tennessee Historical Commission and has written or co-authored more than 22 books, including Sister States, Enemy States: The Civil War in Kentucky and Tennessee and Tennessee: State of the Nation.

The program is sponsored by Consolidated Nuclear Security, LLC and is free and open to the public. The lecture will begin at noon at the East Tennessee History Center, 601 S. Gay Street, Knoxville. Guests are invited to bring a “Brown Bag” lunch and enjoy the lecture. Soft drinks will be available.

For more information on the lecture, exhibitions, or museum hours, call 865-215-8824 or visit the website at www.EastTNHistory.org.


Emporium gallery features new works

The Arts & Culture Alliance is pleased to present five new exhibitions at the Emporium Center in downtown Knoxville from October 7-28, 2016. A public reception will take place on Friday, October 7, from 5:00-9:00 PM to which the public is invited to meet the artists and view the artwork. Most of the works are for sale.

The Tennessee Artists Association: The Fall Juried Show: 42nd Fall Art Exhibition in the downstairs gallery. The Tennessee Artists Association (TAA) will feature original art by over 40 Tennessee artists including oils, watercolors, acrylics, pastels, photography, and mixed media.

In the balcony gallery, the Arrowmont Experience will feature work by its current Artists-in-Residence, Grant Benoit, Richard W. James, Maia Leppo, Austin Riddle, and Emily Schubert, as well as a small selection of works from its permanent collection. This exhibition is presented in conjunction with Tennessee Craft Week, October 7-16, 2016, a collection of craft events and happenings across the state each October.

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Pottery by Rex W. Redd will be shown in the Emporium display case, from October 7-28, 2016. A public reception will take place on Friday, October 7, from 5:00-9:00 PM to which the public is invited to meet the artists and view the artwork. Most of the works are for sale. Redd’s work is an exhibition in clay that pays homage to the history of the medium, but with a contemporary flair to underscore art’s innate tendency to evolve as it passes from maker to maker. Photo courtesy the artist.

As a native Montanan, Rex W. Redd had the blessing of growing up immersed in natural beauty. The central part of the state features vast open grasslands, time worn sandstone structures, and the endless “Big Sky” for which the state is known. Redd attended the University of Montana at Missoula where he graduated with a degree in Anthropology and discovered his true love for the arts. Growing up in Montana usually means ample exposure to Charles Russell, Frederick Remington, and a variety of other cowboy-related art. Craft is dominated by an incredible variety of Native American work, tooled leather, and an array of folk art. While certainly wonderful examples to be surrounded by, college would introduce him to the world of impressionism, abstraction, contemporary craftsmen and the great masters. Redd works in several other mediums including painting, printmaking, photography and wood; often incorporating more than one into a project. He has work in several private and corporate collections throughout the United States, as well as Europe, Japan, and Australia.

Other works on display include Impressions of Nature by Dennis Sabo in the Atrium and Melanie Fetterolf’s Rain Paintings & Classroom Art on the North Wall.

The exhibitions are on display at the Emporium Center, 100 S. Gay Street, in downtown Knoxville. Exhibition hours are Monday-Friday, 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM and Sunday, 3:30-6:30 PM (through October 23). For more information, please contact the Arts & Culture Alliance at (865) 523-7543.


A1LabArts presents fall exhibit

On Friday October 7, 2016, from 5-10 pm A1Labarts will present their 2016 Fall Membership exhibition. Participants are 24 members of A1LabArts which were randomly paired to exchange their works of art over the summer and then create a piece in response to their partner’s work.

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The results will be in this exhibit. In addition to this work, other members will also display their individual art as well.

There will be a closing reception as well held on Friday, October 21 from 6-9pm.

The gallery is located at 23 Emory Place, Knoxville TN 37917

For more information on the exhibit visit www.a1labarts.org.

Based in Knoxville, Tennessee, A1LabArts is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization founded in 1995 by a group of local artists. It is dedicated to multi-disciplinary and experimental exploration of contemporary art issues in all media.

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Mayor to proclaim Louie Bluie Day

Sixteen years after legendary stringband musician and artist Howard “Louie Bluie” Armstrong performed at the Laurel Theater as part of a celebrated homecoming visit to East Tennessee, his son Ralphe will pay tribute to his father’s legacy with a concert at the same venue. In honor of the occasion, Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero will personally present a proclamation designating September 22, 2016 as “Louie Bluie Day.”

Ralphe Armstrong, a Grammy-nominated jazz and rock bassist based in Detroit, will perform as part of the Armstrong Legacy Trio, which also includes guitarist Ray Kamalay and violinist/mandolin player John Reynolds. The concert is Thursday, September 22, 8 p.m. at the Laurel Theater.

Through her proclamation, Mayor Rogero’s will acknowledge Tennessee native Howard Armstrong’s musical virtuosity and his part in music history as a member of the Tennessee Chocolate Drops, who recorded for Vocalion during the St. James recording sessions of 1929. Howard, who was born in Dayton and grew up in LaFollette, received a WC Handy Award (now Blues Music Award), and the National Endowment for the Arts called him a “national treasure” when they made him a National Heritage Fellow award in 1990.

Tickets to the concert are $20 for Jubilee Community Arts members, $21 for non-members. Advance tickets are available online at JubileeArts.org; remaining tickets will be sold at the door starting at 7:30 p.m.

Ralphe was performing with his father by age 5. By 13, he played with Smokey Robinson and the Miracles; by 16 he affiliated with Jean-Luc Ponty and Frank Zappa (which continued for many years). The original bassist in the Mahavishnu Orchestra with John MacLaughlin, Ralphe has performed and recorded with Aretha Franklin, James Carter, Sting, Roger Daltrey, Eminem, and many more artists in a wide variety of genres. Earlier this year, Ralphe was honored by his hometown and voted “Best Jazz Instrumentalist” at the Detroit Music Awards.

Kamalay has shared stages with Mark O’Connor, Doc Watson, Jethro Burns, Steve Goodman, and others. He began performing with Howard and Ralphe in 1988 when the three of them formed the Howard Armstrong Trio.

Reynolds was influenced by a number of traditional music masters including Howard Armstrong, with whom he performed for decades.

The Armstrong Legacy Trio’s performance at the Laurel Theater previews their 4:15 p.m. set at the 10th Louie Bluie Music & Arts Festival on Saturday, September 24, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. at Cove Lake State Park in Caryville, Tenn. For more information about the festival, visit LouieBluie.org.


Carpetbag Theatre receives grant

The Carpetbag Theatre, Inc. is proud to announce the receipt of a major multi-year grant awarded from The Roy Cockrum Foundation in support of the organization’s 50th Anniversary Celebration Series.

The Carpetbag Theatre, Inc. will be utilizing the funds received to remount six of the most beloved plays from the theatre’s past, as well as supporting the future creation and development of Carpetbag’s newest original work currently entitled, “Bricks.”

With generous support from The Roy Cockrum Foundation, Carpetbag will be remounting these original works as fully produced performances at fully equipped Knoxville and Maryville, Tennessee venues. The performances will take place over the course of the three years leading up to the Anniversary celebration (2017, 2018, 2019) with two productions per year. CBT will invite former ensemble members who have remained in the professional field to return as guest artists and directors of the project.

The scheduled plays to be presented are as follows: Between A Ballad and A Blues, Nothin’ Nice, Dark Cowgirls and Prairie Queens, Ce Nitram Sacul, SWOPERA (a Spoken Word Opera), and Red Summer. The development of Carpetbag’s newest work, “Bricks” will trace the history of the African American brick making industry and its significance to the region.

The Carpetbag Theatre is a Professional African American Legacy Theater company with a rich history of service to diverse populations. As an intergenerational ensemble company, the company’s efforts are to engage communities of color and other disenfranchised communities. An ensemble company both artistically and administratively, CBT works collaboratively to fulfill this mission, to build communities and to develop social capital, emphasizing inclusion and cross-cultural dialogue.

The mission of The Roy Cockrum Foundation is to award grants to support world-class performing arts projects in not-for-profit professional theaters throughout the United States.


Living History at Marble Springs

THIS WEEKEND Marble Springs State Historic Site is pleased to host a weekend of Living History in celebration of the life and times of the first governor of Tennessee, John Sevier, in commemoration of his 271 st birthday. John Sevier Days Living History Weekend will take place Saturday, September 17, 2016 from 10:00 AM– 5:00 PM and Sunday, September 18, from 11:00 – 4:00 PM. You can expect to enjoy 18th century demonstrations such as open-hearth cooking, spinning and weaving, blacksmithing, weapons demonstrations that will showcase period-appropriate firearms, 18th century style militia drills, regional craft demonstrations, historic lecture, and hands on archeology activities. Food, drinks, and special treats will be available.

Admission for Sevier Days is $5.00 per adult (16+); $3 per child (7-15); 6 and under FREE; Parking is free. All proceeds benefit the mission of preservation and education of the Marble Springs State Historic Site.

For more information call (865)573-5508 or email infor@marblesprings.net or visit www.marblesprings.net.

Programming assistance for this event is provided by Knox County. Marble Springs is funded under an agreement with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Tennessee Historical Commission, and supplemented by additional funds raised by the Governor John Sevier Memorial Association.

All activities take place at the Marble Springs State Historic Site: 1220 West Governor John Sevier Highway.

About Marble Springs State Historic Site

Marble Springs State Historic Site is the last remaining home of John Sevier. Born in Virginia in 1745, John Sevier made a name for himself as a Revolutionary War Hero during the Battle of Kings Mountain (1780), a key player; Governor of the short-lived State of Franklin (1784-1788), and ultimately was elected to serve as the first Governor of the State of Tennessee (1796). Marble Springs was the approximate 350-acre farm that Sevier lived on from 1801-1815, the last years of his life. Sevier named his farm Marble Springs because of the Tennessee Rose Marble that was quarried on site and the natural springs that flowed on the property.


GSM National Park plays mountain music

GSMNP – Great Smoky Mountains National Park will host the twelfth annual “Music of the Mountains” celebration September 9-10, 2016. The event tells the story of music in the Southern Appalachians through its diverse history by letting visitors experience a variety of music that was played in the region or represents old-time music’s roots. Performances throughout the event tell the story of how mountain music grew out of traditional Celtic and religious roots to become something that would be played on front porches all over the Smokies.

“The music in these mountains tells such a wonderful story,” said Park Ranger Brad Free. “This event provides the opportunity to find the type of traditional music that you love and learn how the stories that the music tells connect it to this place and its people.”

The two-day event begins with a concert of Celtic music by Four Leaf Peat on Friday, September 9, 2016 at 7:00 p.m. at the Great Smoky Mountain Heritage Center in Townsend, TN. General admission is $5.00. The event continues on Saturday, September 10 with a series of free performances supported by Public Radio Station WDVX (89.9 FM) in celebration of the National Park Service Centennial. Musicians will play on Park Headquarters lawn from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. with music from Pappy Fisher, the John Myer’s Band, Red Shoes and Rosin, and more. WDVX will broadcast portions of the program live from Park Headquarters starting at 11:00 a.m.

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The late afternoon performances by John Lilly, The Brother Boys, Dale Jett and Hello Stranger (pictured above), and Amythyst Kiah from 3:00 p.m to 5:00 p.m. will feature music from the recently released album, “On Top of Old Smoky: New Old-Time Smoky Mountain Music,” which was one of several National Park Service Centennial recognition projects produced by Great Smoky Mountains Association in honor of the 100 year anniversary. The traditional American music on the CD features artists of today recreating songs performed by Smoky Mountain residents at the time of the development of the national park.

The event will be held rain or shine, but performances may be moved to the adjacent Sugarlands Visitor Center theatre in case of inclement weather. Participants are encouraged to bring blankets or chairs for sitting on the lawn. Event parking and restrooms are provided at Sugarlands Visitor Center. Handicap parking is available at both Park Headquarters and Sugarlands Visitor Center.

Schedule of Events:

September 9 – Great Smoky Mountain Heritage Center in Townsend, TN
Admission: $ 5.00
7:00 p.m. – Celtic Music by Four Leaf Peat

September 10 – Park Headquarters Lawn adjacent to Sugarlands Visitor Center near Gatlinburg, TN
Admission is Free

10:00 a.m. Pappy Fisher
11:00 a.m. Red Shoes and Rosin
12:00 p.m. The Bearded
1:00 p.m. John Myer
3:00 p.m. John Lilly
3:30 p.m. The Brother Boys (Ed Snodderly and Eugene Wolf)
4:00 p.m. Dale Jett and Hello Stranger
4:30 p.m. Amythyst Kiah

Visit NPS.gov.


Library sponsors author readings

Novelist Leah Stewart will read from her work at the University of Tennessee on Monday, September 19, 2016. The event is part of the university’s Writers in the Library reading series. The public is invited to this free reading at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of UT’s John C. Hodges Library.

Stewart is the author of five novels, most recently The New Neighbor, a darkly sophisticated novel about an old woman’s curiosity turned into a dangerous obsession as she becomes involved in her new neighbor’s complicated and cloaked life. The New York Times Book Review says of The New Neighbor, “Stewart never relaxes her tight focus on these complex characters.” People Magazine calls it “a chilling page-turner.”

Stewart is professor and area director of creative writing in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of Cincinnati. She has held visiting writer positions at the University of the South in Sewanee, Tennessee; Vanderbilt University; and Murray State University in Kentucky. In 2010, she was the recipient of an NEA Literature Fellowship and in 2014 the recipient of a Sachs Fund Prize.

Visit http://library.utk.edu/writers for a complete schedule of Writers in the Library readings for the 2016-2017 academic year.

Writers in the Library is sponsored by the UT Libraries and the Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund. For more information, contact Erin Elizabeth Smith, Jack E. Reese Writer-in-Residence at the UT Libraries, at esmith83@utk.edu.


Jazz Orchestra season begins Sept 27

The Knoxville Jazz Orchestra’s 2016-17 concert season begins on Tuesday, September 27, 2016 at 8pm with “Cuban Fire with Paquito D’Rivera”. The program will be held at the Bijou Theatre at 803 South Gay Street in downtown Knoxville, Tennessee.

Paq_sitting_chair

Saxophonist and clarinetist Paquito D’Rivera’s extraordinary career defies categorization. A native of Havana, Cuba, Paquito is the winner of fourteen Grammy awards, a lifetime achievement award from Carnegie Hall, a NEA Jazz Masters award and a Guggenheim fellowship. Photo courtesy KJO.

D’Rivera’s performance credits range from Dizzy Gillespie’s United Nations Orchestra to the Warsaw Philharmonic, with many stops in between. For this special performance, Paquito and his rhythm section join the KJO for an exciting journey to the crossroads of big band jazz and Latin music.

The Knoxville Jazz Orchestra is a 17 piece big band comprised of professional musicians from across the region. Since its inception in 1999, the orchestra has performed dozens of concerts in East Tennessee, appeared on major jazz festivals in Europe, performed and recorded with internationally acclaimed guest artists, and released four critically acclaimed CD recordings.

Tickets for the event are $35.50 adult, $15.00 student. Tickets are available in advance at http://www.knoxjazz.org, by calling 684-1200 or by visiting the Tennessee Theatre Box office.

 


Oak Ridge Symphony perform Sept 24

The Oak Ridge Civic Music Association is pleased to present the Oak Ridge Symphony Orchestra, led by Maestro Dan Allcott, in a performance of new music by East Tennessee composer Mark Harrell on Saturday, September 24, 2016 at 7:30 PM at the Oak Ridge High School Performing Arts Center.

The concert, entitled Pride of Place, is a celebration of Oak Ridge, especially recognizing the scientists and immigrants who founded this community. Commissioned by the JAZ Fund, Mark Harrell’s π to the Sky: Tribute to Discovery is a celebration of the post-WWII generation of Oak Ridge scientists and their numerous accomplishments. The concert will also celebrate the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service with Peter Boyer’s moving narrated work, Ellis Island: The Dream of America.

“The concert Pride of Place gives us a chance to celebrate the uniqueness of Oak Ridge and the United States,” said Music Director, Dan Allcott. “That pride is alive and well as we celebrate a world premiere written for us by Mark Harrell – Pi to the Sky. The concert concludes with Ellis Island: The Dream of America, which was programmed to help celebrate the 100th anniversary of the U.S. National Park Service. It is a celebration of the immigrant story which sits in the background of many of our families.”

“We are proud to partner with the National Park Service for this performance,” said Executive Director, Rachel Perkins. “To celebrate this special occasion, student groups and their adult chaperones will receive free admission to this performance.”

The Oak Ridge High School String Quartet will perform in the lobby before the concert, and patrons are invited to meet members of the Oak Ridge Symphony Orchestra at a celebratory reception in the lobby after the performance.

ORSO_Strings

The Oak Ridge Civic Music Association presents professional performances in the Oak Ridge community with its symphony, chorus, and chamber music series. Subscription and individual tickets may be purchased online at www.ORCMA.org or by calling (865) 483-5569. Photo courtesy ORCMA.


Parsons is Writers Guild speaker

Noted poet Linda Parsons will speak at the Thursday, Sept. 1, 2016 meeting of the Knoxville Writers’ Guild. She will present her new and fourth poetry collection, “This Shaky Earth” (Texas Review Press, 2016), and discuss the process of preparing a collection.

The meeting is open to the public and will begin at 7 p.m. in Central United Methodist Church’s Fellowship Hall at 201 E. Third Ave. The event is at the same time as the first UT football game of the season, but you can click here to find a route that bypasses the traffic. Attendees should enter off the large parking lot behind the church. A $2 donation is welcome at the door with free and accessible parking available.

“‘This Shaky Earth’ straddles time, family divisions and legacies. It’s leavened with a hunger to understand the growing pains of childhood and to know that all will be well as we navigate this sometimes ‘shaky earth,’” Parsons said. “I’m excited to discuss the process and challenges of compiling and organizing a collection for publication.”

Parsons is a member of the East Tennessee Writers Hall of Fame. Her poems have appeared in journals such as The Georgia Review, Iowa Review, Prairie Schooner, Southern Poetry Review, Asheville Poetry Review, and Shenandoah and in numerous anthologies. Her play adaptation, “Macbeth Is the New Black,” co-written by Jayne Morgan, completed runs at Maryville College and Western Carolina University. In October, she will present the Henrietta Jenkins Memorial Homecoming reading at Carson Newman University.


Gallery welcomes David Barnett

On Monday, August 29, 2016, Knoxville’s Schwarzbart Gallery will welcome David Barnett, a painter, illustrator, designer and muralist currently living and working in the Catskills – but with some very relevant Knoxville ties. Barnett is the nephew of local woodworking designer Ernie Gross and his wife Pam. He grew up in Knoxville and spent Tuesday evenings studying with Arnold Schwarzbart.

“David’s exhibit as the Schwarzbart Gallery’s first featured artist from outside this community is equally exciting and poignant for us,” said Deborah Oleshansky, Executive Director of the Knoxville Jewish Alliance. “We’re honored to welcome his work, and hope that many people will come to the Gallery to see it in the coming months.”

An Artist Reception will be held on Monday, August 29:
5:30 – 7:00 PM at the AJCC Schwarzbart Gallery
6800 Deane Hill Drive – Knoxville, TN
This is a free event, open to the community and members of all faiths.

David Barnett’s work will be on display at the Schwarzbart Gallery through September 2016. Individuals or groups may request a guided tour by contacting the Knoxville Jewish Alliance.

PalmSpringsatNoon

Palm Springs at Noon, by David Barnett.

Barnett’s work depicts moments in his own life, where the emotional atmosphere overwhelms the subject. He allows his paintings to emote rather than conceptualize. Using color and gesture, he situates his thoughts and memories firmly within an emotional context, separating them from progression and reason. He draws from varied influences, as far reaching as moviemakers like Charlie Kaufman and Denis Villeneuve, to those more closely related, like Peter Doig and Pierre Bonnard.

Visit www.blankwallproductions.com


Marble Springs hosts Living History

KNOXVILLE, TN – Marble Springs State Historic Site will host a weekend of Living History in celebration of the life and times of the first governor of Tennessee, John Sevier, in commemoration of his 271st birthday.

John Sevier Days Living History Weekend will take place Saturday, September 17, 2016 from 10:00 AM– 5:00 PM and Sunday, September 18, from 11:00 – 4:00 PM. You can expect to enjoy 18th century demonstrations such as open-hearth cooking, spinning and weaving, blacksmithing, weapons demonstrations that will showcase period-appropriate firearms, 18th century style militia drills, regional craft demonstrations, historic lecture, hands on archeology activities, and more. Food, drinks, and special treats will be available. Details are subject to change.

Admission for Sevier Days is $5.00 per adult (16+); $3 per child (7-15); 6 and under FREE; Parking is free. All proceeds benefit the mission of preservation and education of the Marble Springs State Historic Site.

Programming assistance for this event is provided by Knox County. Marble Springs is funded under an agreement with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Tennessee Historical Commission, and supplemented by additional funds raised by the Governor John Sevier Memorial Association.

Marble Springs State Historic Site is located at 1220 West Governor John Sevier Highway, Knoxville, TN, 37920.

Marble Springs State Historic Site is the last remaining home of John Sevier. Born in Virginia in 1745, John Sevier made a name for himself as a Revolutionary War Hero during the Battle of Kings Mountain (1780), a key player and Governor of the short-lived State of Franklin (1784-1788), and ultimately was elected to serve as the first Governor of the State of Tennessee (1796).

For more information call (865)573-5508.


Museum hosts antique sale

On Friday and Saturday, September 9-10, 2016, the Museum of Appalachia will celebrate its 5th annual “Days of the Pioneer” Antique Show. This two-day event features the finest selection of 18th and 19th century antiques from over 60 of the nation’s preeminent dealers.

Museum President Elaine Meyer says, “With the 65-acre Museum of Appalachia as a backdrop, attendees can tour the Museum and see thousands of early American artifacts in their natural setting, and then have the opportunity to purchase similar items from some of the best antique dealers in the country.”

Held on the grounds of the Museum of Appalachia, the event also features mountain music, Revolutionary and Civil War encampments, and traditional craftsmen demonstrating pioneer skills. Guests will enjoy activities such as sawmilling, blacksmithing, sorghum making, spinning, weaving, and more.

Admission to the Antique Show includes a tour of the Museum mountain farm and village, which contains some three-dozen historic log structures, exhibit halls filled with thousands of Appalachian artifacts, gardens, and free-range farm animals.

Advance tickets are available at a discount through August 22nd. Tickets can be purchased online at www.museumofappalachia.org, by phone, or in-person. This event is free for Museum Members.

The Museum is located 16 miles north of Knoxville, one mile east of I-75 at Exit 122. For more information call (865) 494-7680 or visit the website at www.museumofappalachia.org.

 


Emporium features new art

The Arts & Culture Alliance is pleased to present five new exhibitions at the Emporium Center in downtown Knoxville from September 2-30, 2016. A public reception will take place on Friday, September 2, from 5:00-9:00 PM to which the public is invited to meet the artists and view the artwork. Most of the works are for sale and may be purchased through the close of the exhibition.

The First Friday reception also features Pasion Flamenca from 6:00-6:30 PM and a Jazz Jam with Vance Thompson’s Friends from 7:00-9:00 PM in the Black Box. Complimentary hors d’oeuvres will be available, and chocolate fondue will be provided by the Melting Pot of Knoxville.

Stephen Reid Carcello: Slot Machine
In the downstairs gallery

S_Carcello

Stephen Carcello graduated from the University of Tennessee-Knoxville in 2009 with a degree in Studio Art and in 2013 from the University of Arizona with a Masters in Visual Communication and Design. His passion is illustrated anthropology. Through this exhibition, he seeks to present a series of work that helps elevate the coloring page so as to favor display on the mantle over display on the fridge. He scales up the coloring page and shows a universally-recognized source material. Image submitted.

“The works I present are also meant to contrast the modern mobile app and coloring for therapy purposes,” says Carcello. “I want to point out two concurrent, but seemingly opposing trends: the rise in popularity of coloring books and the rise of the mobile app modeled after video slot machines.”

Other artists featured in the upcoming exhibition include “We The People” by Antuco Chicaiza; Projects by Emily Taylor; Anthony Donaldson: A Time of Recent Creativity; and “Cosmic Order” by Eurichea Showalter Subagh Ball.

The exhibitions are on display at the Emporium Center, 100 S. Gay Street, in downtown Knoxville. Exhibition hours are Monday-Friday, 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM with additional hours on Tuesday, September 13, 6:30-9:30 PM for a jazz jam in the Black Box with Vance Thompson/Keith Brown Duo. Please note, the Emporium will be closed on Monday, September 5, for the holiday.

For more information, please contact the Arts & Culture Alliance at (865) 523-7543, or visit the Web site at www.knoxalliance.com.

The Arts & Culture Alliance serves and supports a diverse community of artists, arts organizations, and cultural institutions. The Alliance receives financial support from the Tennessee Arts Commission, the City of Knoxville, and First Tennessee Foundation.


History Center hosts First Families reunion

(Knoxville, TN) The East Tennessee Historical Society will commemorate the state’s 220th birthday with a First Families of Tennessee Reunion and Jubilee, August 19-21, 2016. The weekend will include a FFT dinner at Marble Springs, home of Tennessee Governor John Sevier, with period music, dances, and living history presentations, and tours of Marble Springs, with special time set aside for attendees to visit, compare research, and meet up with cousins.

A genealogy conference will focus on records and research methods for the pioneer period, as well as the history of the state’s early settlement, including the Watauga Association, the State of Franklin, county and state records, and more. The conference keynote speaker will be Troy Wayne Poteete, chief justice of the Cherokee Supreme Court, Tahlequah, Oklahoma, who will discuss the experiences of the Cherokee after they reached Oklahoma.

On Sunday, August 21, bus tours will travel to important pioneer sites in upper East Tennessee, such as Sycamore Shoals, Tipton-Haynes House, the site of the Battle of the State of Franklin, and replica of the State of Franklin log cabin capitol in Greeneville.

The First Families of Tennessee Reunion will be held in conjunction with the annual East Tennessee History Fair, which will take place on Saturday. The fair features traditional music, children’s games and activities, vintage films, living history presentations from the Cherokee to the Vietnam War, a History Hound costume competition, free admission to the Museum of East Tennessee History, bus tours to historic sites, and a birthday party for Davy Crockett, complete with cake.

First Families of Tennessee is a family heritage program of the East Tennessee Historical Society, with membership open to anyone who can prove descent from an ancestor who was in Tennessee by statehood in 1796. FFT has almost 16,000 members representing all fifty states and eight foreign countries.

All events are open to the public. Most East Tennessee History Fair activities are free. Pre-registration and a fee are required for participation in First Families of Tennessee events. For more information on the schedule of events, costs, and registration, see www.eastTNhistory.org/FFTReunion.

About the East Tennessee Historical Society

Established in 1834, the East Tennessee Historical Society has been helping East Tennesseans hold on to our unique heritage—recording the events, collecting the artifacts, and saving the stories that comprise the history we all share. The historical society pursues its education mission through publications, lectures, conferences, school programs, museum exhibits, and heritage programs such as the popular First Families of Tennessee and Civil War Families of Tennessee. The East Tennessee History Center houses the staff and programs of the East Tennessee Historical Society, the Museum of East Tennessee History, the Calvin M. McClung Historical Collection, and the Knox County Archives.


Bar Church is July 13 at Open Chord

Celebrate Knoxville spoke with Matt Peeples this afternoon, who will be speaking at Bar Church on July 13, 2016, at 7:30pm at The Open Chord. This event (including the option to enjoy refreshing beer during the service) is sponsored by The Point, a church that meets regularly at Regal Cinema in West Town Mall.

“Bar Church is a way for us to connect with people in a relaxed atmosphere and communicate with them about faith,” Peeples said. “This is our third summer for doing Bar Church. It’s an event that moves around town and has previously been held at Relix Variety Theater, and Scruffy City Music Hall.”

BarChurch

Bar Church will be held July 13, 2016 at The Open Chord, a Knoxville business that features live music, a music school, and a music store, all in one location. People of all walks of life, believers and unbelievers and all points between, meet together, have a beer if they want to, listen to a message by Pastor Matt Peeples, and ask questions via texting during the message. Photo courtesy Bar Church/The Point.

“We have new cultural realities when it comes to communication,” Peeples said. “Feedback is not an option anymore, it is a demand. People have so many avenues for creating their own media channels and texting (during the message at Bar Church) gives people an opportunity to consider what is being said to them without feeling like they are being lectured. It is more of a conversation.”

Peeples said The Point is a church plant for Grace Lutheran in Knoxville and is orthodox Christian in beliefs. The doctines of the Trinity, Resurrection, and divine inspiration of Scripture are part of the creed.

Some people might think that having a church in a bar is a conflict of interest, but Peeples says that Jesus was/is interested in being culturally relevant. A relaxed, fun neighborhood bar is a place where conversations among different groups happen and relationships can be built.

When asked if Martin Luther was really a beer drinker, Peeples responded with “yes, his wife was a brewer. We joke that Bar Church is more beer, less wine than regular church.”

Bar Church is “music heavy” and can last from an hour and a half to two hours, with a cultural mix of music that can range anywhere from Christian contemporary music to Bob Marley and Foo Fighters. The “House Band,” as Peeples calls it, is led by Trey Sanson, formerly with Left Foot Down.

Peeples is originally from Kansas City and went to grad school in St. Louis. He lives in Knoxville with his wife and two sons, ages 3 years and 16 months.

The regular worship Sunday services for The Point are held at West Town Mall’s Regal Cinema at 9:30 am and 10:45 am.

For more information about Bar Church or The Point, visit http://www.thepointknox.com.


McClung displays mate to artifact

KNOXVILLE—A prehistoric Native American statue currently on display in the lobby of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville’s McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture is thought to be the female counterpart to a male figure that was named the Tennessee State Artifact in 2014.

Sellars statue_Sellar Statue

The pair appears to have been made by the same sculptor between A.D. 1250 and 1350, and the two rank among the finest prehistoric sculptures ever found in the United States. Both statues were found in the 1930s at the Sellars farm in Wilson County, Tennessee, and they appeared together for the first time in the Tennessee State Museum’s recent “Ancestors” exhibition. Paired male and female statues are thought to represent founding ancestors of the prehistoric Native American societies of the middle South.

The male statue was sold to UT in 1940 by the tenant farmer. The figure has been featured in several scientific and popular publications, including a 1941 issue of “Time” magazine and as a United States postal stamp celebrating the opening of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in 2004. It has been featured in various museums worldwide, including the 1992 exhibition “Tresors du Nouveau Monde” at the Musees Royaux d’Art et d’Histoire in Brussels, Belgium, and the Art Institute of Chicago’s exhibit “Hero, Hawk, and Open Hand” in 2004 and 2005.

The female statue was sold by the Sellars family to Lillard Yeaman, sheriff of Smith County and an amateur archaeologist, and then to John C. Waggoner Jr. of Carthage, Tennessee. Waggoner has loaned the statue to UT, and the pair will be on display in the lobby of the McClung Museum through the end of the year.

Recognizing the importance of keeping the statue in Tennessee and reuniting it with its male counterpart, Waggoner has offered the museum a purchase option. To reach this end, the museum is now engaged in a fundraising effort.

Exhibits at the McClung Museum showcase the geologic, historical and artistic past of Tennessee, as well as cultures from around the globe.

The McClung Museum is at 1327 Circle Park Drive. Museum admission is free, and the museum’s hours are 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Monday to Saturday and 1–5 p.m. Sundays.


CBT names new board members

KNOXVILLE, TN – The Clarence Brown Theatre, one of thirteen professional LORT (League of Regional Theatres) theatres on a university campus in the country, has announced its newly appointed 2016 Advisory Board members earlier this summer. The CBT Advisory Board is a vital link to the Greater Knoxville community, overseeing major events and fundraisers, the CBT Society Scholarship, and engaging the community to grow the theatre’s exposure and support.

“We continue our efforts to bring to our Advisory Board ever-greater diversity in experience and viewpoint. And we are delighted that our new Board members share with our current Advisory Board a passion for the theater and for our joint professional/educational mission,” said Calvin MacLean, Artistic Producing Director of the CBT. “Truly an extraordinary group of individuals from many different walks of life.”

The newly elected Advisory Board members of the Clarence Brown Theatre include: Ron Alexander (Willis of Tennessee); Michelle D. Commander (University of Tennessee); Michael Higdon (University of Tennessee); Margie Nichols (University of Tennessee, retired); Todd Richesin (UPSTAIRS at Todd Richesin Interiors); Ingrid Ruffin (University of Tennessee).

The 2016-2017 Chair of the Advisory Board is Brooks Clark, serving the second of his two-year term.

Other Advisory, Associate, and Emeritus Board members include: Nan Bobbett, Charlie Brakebill, Rick Carl, Joe De Fiore, Susan Farris, Coral Getino, Rosemary Gilliam, Michael Grider, Carmen Harb, Nazzy Hashemian, Amy Morris Hess, Julie Howard, Tony Johnson, Russ Johnston, Bob Lederer, Brenda Madigan, Angela Masini, Maureen Dunn McBride, Sheena McCall, John North, Townes Osborn, Bob Parrott, William Pender, Stephanie Piper, Whitney Ray-Dawson, Lee Riedinger, Susan Sgarlat, Jan Simek, Steve Smith, Lamarr Stout, Kay Stoutt, Rosalyn Tillman, Alice Torbett, Joe Trahern, Peggy Turner, Robin Turner, Lacy Wallace, Alexander Waters, Alice Wirth, Melanie Wood, and Wendy Wortham.

Under the leadership of Producing Artistic Director Calvin MacLean and Managing Director David B. Byrd, the CBT season runs from September through May and features eight productions ranging from musicals to drama.

For more information, tickets or accessibility accommodation requests including Open Captioning, ASL, and assistive technologies, please call the CBT Box Office at 865-974-5161 or visit online at clarencebrowntheatre.com/access.

 


Author makes historic trek

Author Jerry Ellis will be speaking about his 900 mile walk along the Cherokee Trail of Tears as guest speaker for the Historic Ramsey House Annual Meeting to be held at the East Tennessee Historic Center, 601 S Gay Street on June 21, 2016 at 5:30pm. Ellis, a graduate of the University of Alabama, became, in 1989 the first person in the modern world to walk the Trail of Tears.

Jerry_with_walking_stick

Jerry Ellis

“I did the walk to honor the Cherokee and to raise awareness about Cherokee history,” said Ellis. “I sold all I owned to finance the life-altering, two month trek. I slept mostly in woods and fields along the Trail, though sometimes kind strangers gave me shelter and a meal for the night.”

Random House nominated Ellis’ resulting book, Walking the Trail, One Man’s Journey Along the Cherokee Trail of Tears, for a Pulitzer Prize and a National Book Award. It has been read by more than 600,000, quoted in Reader’s Digest, and went on display in 2011 at the National Teachers’ Hall of Fame.

A meet and greet and book signing will begin at 5:30 with supper and program to follow at 6:15.

Tickets are $20 for members of Ramsey House and $25 for non members. Reservations can be made at 865-546- 0745 or by email at judy@ramseyhouse.org.

 


Enjoy Jewish traditional foods

KNOXVILLE, TN – You might be familiar with bagels and lox, or challah bread. But what about shakshuka or mandlebrot? On May 22, 2016 the greater Knoxville community will have a chance to try both of these Jewish foods, and many more, at the first-ever “Knoshville” Jewish Food Festival. (The event’s name is a play on the Yiddish word “nosh,” which means to snack or nibble.)

bagels&lox

“Knoshville will bring together every Jewish organization in the Knoxville and Oak Ridge area, in celebration and appreciation of Jewish foods and cuisine. The entire community is invited to attend, nosh with us, and learn about the foods that bring us together,” says Deborah Oleshansky, Executive Director of the Knoxville Jewish Alliance. “It’s going to be very fun, and also very delicious.”

Knoshville Jewish Food Festival
Sunday, May 22 • 11:00AM – 3:00PM
Arnstein Jewish Community Center (AJCC), 6800 Deane Hill Drive
Admission is free; minimum food purchase of $10.00
The entire community is invited to attend and nosh! (RAIN OR SHINE.)

Menu items to include:
Bagels and lox (smoked salmon); Shakshuka (Middle Eastern spicy baked egg dish); Bundt cakes; “black and white” cookies; mandlebrot (it’s like biscotti, but better) potato latkes (pancakes); potato knishes (delicious filling covered with dough and baked or fried); matzah ball soup (dumplings in broth); challah (Jewish egg bread)

Please note: In respect of kashrut, the kosher Jewish dietary laws and traditions, no meat or poultry items will be available at this event. Dairy, fish and vegetarian items and some gluten-free items will be available. The Knoxville Jewish Alliance looks forward to announcing a kosher deli event in Fall 2016. Stay tuned!

Participating organizations: Knoxville Jewish Alliance, Heska Amuna Synagogue, Temple Beth El, Knoxville Jewish Day School, Chabad of Knoxville, Jewish Congregation of Oak Ridge, the local chapters of Hadassah and BBYO, and the Young Jewish Adults of Knoxville.

Knoshville will also feature Israeli dancing, music, and an art gallery. An AJCC pool open house will occur from 1:00PM – 5:00PM; pool use is free to the community.


Kid’s night out at the museum

KNOXVILLE—The McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, will host its first “Night at the McClung Museum” family sleepover from 7 p.m. Friday, June 17, 2016 to 8 a.m. Saturday, June 18.

The sleepover will provide children ages 5 to 11 and their parents the opportunity to spend an unforgettable night with dinosaurs and explore the museum’s new special exhibition, “Dinosaur Discoveries: Ancient Fossils, New Ideas,” on loan from the American Museum of Natural History, which reveals a vivid picture of what living, breathing dinosaurs were really like. The event also will feature family-friendly activities including dino-related crafts, a flashlight tour, games, a movie screening and bedtime stories.

nightatthemuseum

Tickets are $40 a person for museum members and $50 a person for nonmembers and include all activities and craft supplies, a survival pack with an exclusive event-themed bag, flashlight, evening snacks and supplies, and breakfast Saturday morning. Tickets may be purchased online or over the phone at 865-974-2144. Online ticket purchases will incur an additional processing fee. All children must be age 5 to 11 at the time of the sleepover and must be accompanied by an adult chaperone.

Participants can be dropped off and picked up in front of the museum, or parking passes will be available for $10 for those wishing to park their car overnight.

The McClung Museum is at 1327 Circle Park Drive. Museum admission is free, and the museum’s hours are 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Monday to Saturday and 1–5 p.m. Sundays. Groups may schedule tours by calling 865-974-2144 or emailing museum@utk.edu.

Free two-hour museum parking passes are available from the parking information building at the entrance to Circle Park Drive on weekdays by request. Free parking is available on Circle Park Drive on a first-come, first-served basis on weekends. Free public transportation to the museum is also available via the Knoxville Trolley Vol Line.


Dogwood Arts fest is April 29-May 1

More than 60 juried artists will feature and sell their work at this weekend’s Dogwood Arts festival in Market Square, downtown Knoxville, April 29 through May 1, 2016. Admission is free.

Times are Friday: 11:00am – 9:00pm; Saturday: 10:00am – 9:00pm; Sunday: 11:00am – 5:00pm.

DogwoodArtsFest

Artisans working in mixed media, clay, drawing/pastels, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, painting, photography, sculpture and wood will be selling their wares at Dogwood Arts. Throughout the festival, attendees can take part in interactive demonstrations including glass blowing, stone sculpting, quilting, photography, and fine art painting at Art in Action, located in Krutch Park Extension. File photo by Celebrate Knoxville.

Throughout the festival, live entertainment will be happening on the Market Square stage and the pop-up stage on Union Avenue. The Children’s Stage, located at the Clinch Ave Krutch Park entrance, will showcase live entertainment geared toward children. The Creation Station will also have entertaining family-style craft activities throughout the festival for children of all ages and their families.

For adults, the Dogwood Arts Festival is offering wine tastings and food demonstrations in the Culinary Arts Tent. Friday night in the Culinary Arts Tent, the inaugural Dogwood Diva Dinner featuring Knoxville’s finest female chefs, Holly Hambright, Karen Crumley, Amber Lloyd, and Lisa Smith. Delight in passed hors d’oeuvres, first course, entrée and side followed by dessert, paired with wine. Space is limited.

 


Knoxville features Latino art

KNOXVILLE, TN – The Emporium Center welcomes the International Latino Art Exhibition in the main gallery, May 6-27, 2016. This exhibit is curated by Dina R. Ruta and features fifteen artists from five countries.

Organizers say this exhibition comes from a desire to innovate and give Latin American art a space and purpose here in Knoxville, promoting the integration of cultures in order to broaden the concept of art and establish it as a mode of communication. These exceptional contemporary artists have generated a dynamic dialogue that, together with the overwhelming power of color and varied gesture, consistent with the conception of it as a cultural symbol, transcends the chronological and geographical boundaries of the continent.

Featured artists include:

Argentina: Inés Barlasina, Ángel Barón Da conté, and José Utrera
Colombia: Jorge Yances
Honduras: Elías José Díaz Alcántara, Dennis Cerrato, Víctor López, Sergio Martínez, Santos Arzú Quinto, Omar Sánchez, and Iván Soto
México: Rafael Sáenz Félix and Héctor Saldívar
Venezuela: Ángel Blanco and Al Vanegas

A public reception will take place on Friday, May 6, from 5:00-9:00 PM to which the public is invited to meet the artists and view the artwork. Most of the works are for sale and may be purchased through the close of the exhibition. The First Friday reception also features a Jazz Jam Session hosted by Vance Thompson and Friends from 7:00-9:00 PM in the Black Box Theatre. Complimentary hors d’oeuvres and chocolate fondue from the Melting Pot will be available.

Painting by Sergio Martinez

Artwork by Sergio Martinez is part of the featured international exhibit at the Emporium Center in downtown Knoxville May 6-27, 2016. Photo courtesy Arts and Culture Alliance.


String quartet to perform

The Oak Ridge Civic Music Association is pleased to present the Oak Ridge String Quartet in a romantic program on Saturday, February 20, 2016 at 7:30 PM at the Pollard Auditorium.

ORSO String Quartet

The Oak Ridge String Quartet includes Karen Kartal, Susan Eddlemon, Sara Matayoshi, and Stacy Nickell Miller. Photo submitted.

Violinist Karen Kartal has performed as a soloist with many orchestras, and has won first prize in many competitions, including the MTNA National Chamber Music Competition.  Karen was the Assistant Principal Second Violin of the Knoxville Symphony until 2005 and she is currently Concertmaster of the Oak Ridge Symphony Orchestra.

Susan Lang Eddlemon, violin, is a graduate of the Juilliard School in New York City where she studied under Joseph Fuchs. She is the first woman violinist to receive a Doctor of Musical Arts degree from Juilliard.

Violist Sara Matayoshi has earned recognition for her artistry as a solo, chamber, and orchestral musician, making her solo debut with the Midwest Young Artist’s Orchestra in 2002.   Sara is a former member of the Chicago Civic, Madison Symphony, and Atlantic Symphony Orchestras. In addition to her musical activities, Sara is also a Forrest yoga teacher.

Stacy Nickell Miller, cellist, has performed with the Knoxville Symphony Orchestra since 1998. She has been involved with award-winning outreach programs at schools, libraries, hospitals, and nursing homes. Stacy’s book entitled “Better than Cookies, as Good as Cake” was written to introduce young children to the string quartet, and to the joy of making music.

The Quartet will perform romantic classics by Schubert, Mendelssohn, and Grieg.  Tickets are $25 for adults; $10 for young adults and youth (29 and under).

The Oak Ridge Civic Music Association presents professional performances in the Oak Ridge community with its symphony, chorus, and chamber music series.  Call 865-483-5569.


Knoxville seeks Poet Laureate

The Arts & Culture Alliance of Greater Knoxville invites 2016 nominations for Poet Laureate for the City of Knoxville.

Knoxville has a long and rich literary heritage. George Washington Harris’s Knoxville-based tales of Sut Lovingood were an influence on Mark Twain, William Faulkner and Flannery O’Connor. Frances Hodgson Burnett, author of The Secret Garden, wrote her first novel in Knoxville based on her experiences as an adolescent here. Pulitzer Prize winners James Agee and Cormac McCarthy both grew up in Knoxville, and the city figures prominently in their works. Poet Nikki Giovanni is a Knoxville native who attended Austin High School and has often written about her memories of the city.

The City of Knoxville Poet Laureate Program aims to extend and build on this heritage by recognizing and supporting citizen poets of exceptional talent and accomplishment.

The Poet Laureate shall serve a term of one year with an optional one-year renewal, beginning in the Summer of 2016, during which they shall serve as a public voice of Knoxville, creating city-specific works and participating in literary outreach and educational programs. The Poet Laureate will receive an annual honorarium of $3,000; the award should be considered honorific. The City of Knoxville shall retain license to use, reproduce, and compile the work created for the City by the Poet Laureate in his/her official capacity, but the Poet shall retain all other rights to the work.

The deadline for nominations to be received is Friday, April 1, 2016.

Legal residents of the corporate limits of the city of Knoxville may nominate a poet for the Poet Laureate position. Poets may not self-nominate. Those submitting nominations must be at least 21 years old.

Nomination forms, conditions for eligibility, and instructions for submission of nominations may be obtained from the Arts & Culture Alliance’s website at www.knoxalliance.com/poet.html, or send an SASE to Liza Zenni, Arts & Culture Alliance, PO Box 2506, Knoxville, TN 37901.

About the Arts & Culture Alliance

The Arts & Culture Alliance serves and supports a diverse community of artists, arts organizations, and cultural institutions. The Alliance receives financial support from the Tennessee Arts Commission, the City of Knoxville, and First Tennessee Foundation.