Orchid Awards nominations sought

KNOXVILLE, TN – Keep Knoxville Beautiful is now accepting nominations from the public for its beautification awards, the Orchids. Since 1979, Keep Knoxville Beautiful has presented Orchid Awards to Knoxville and Knox County buildings and outdoor spaces that beautify and elevate the local landscape.
Orchid Awards will be granted in the following six categories:

New Architecture
Redesign/Reuse
Restaurant/Cafe/Bar/Brewery
Outdoor Space (Parks, Patios, Rooftop Gardens, Neighborhoods, etc.)
Public Art (Murals, Sculptures, Signage, etc.)
Environmental Stewardship (Properties that incorporate renewable materials, energy efficiency, LEED certification and/or other sustainable building practices)

Anyone can nominate a location or outdoor public artwork by completing a simple online form on Keep Knoxville Beautiful’s website, keepknoxvillebeautiful.org, or by calling the office at 865-521-6957. Private residences are not considered for this award. Properties that received an Orchid Award since 2008 are ineligible, except in cases of major renovations.

For a list of previous winners, visit the Keep Knoxville Beautiful website. Nominations are due by Friday, December 18, 2017. Keep Knoxville Beautiful will announce the winners of the beautification awards at the annual Orchids Awards Dinner on Tuesday, February 20, 2018 at 6:00 at The Standard, 416 W. Jackson Avenue, downtown Knoxville.

For more information, contact Keep Knoxville Beautiful at info@keepknoxvillebeautiful.org.


Johnson named to Hall of Fame

KNOXVILLE, TN – Johnson Architecture founder and president Daryl Johnson has been named to the Jackson Alumni Hall of Fame in Jackson, New Jersey, in recognition of service to the community. Founded in 1994 by Daryl Johnson, AIA, Johnson Architecture is a design firm that provides architecture, planning and full in-house interior design services for facilities of all types.

Daryl Johnson

The Jackson Alumni Hall of Fame was established in 1991 to recognize graduates who have made significant contributions to their communities through charitable service and to offer scholarships to graduating seniors at Jackson high schools. Johnson, a Jackson Memorial High School graduate, said he continues to watch with interest the happenings in his hometown and appreciates the Hall of Fame’s investment in graduating seniors.

“I am truly honored to have been chosen for this recognition and especially appreciate that the Hall of Fame supports students who excel academically and through community service,” Johnson said. “I look forward to seeing the great things accomplished by the students earning scholarships.”

Johnson Architecture has designed various sized projects for numerous purposes, including commercial, educational, health care, residential, restaurant, tourism and spiritual. Notable clients include Blackberry Farm, Dollywood, Cornerstone of Recovery, First Presbyterian Church, Knoxville’s Community Development Corporation, Clayton Homes, Maryville City Schools, Maryville College, South College, RT Lodge, J.C. Holdway Restaurant and Zoo Knoxville.


New works at Emporium Oct. 2017

KNOXVILLE, TN – The Arts & Culture Alliance is pleased to present five new exhibitions at the Emporium Center in downtown Knoxville from October 6-27, 2017. A reception will take place on Friday, October 6, from 5:00-9:00 PM as part of First Friday activities downtown to which the public is invited to meet the artists and view the artwork. Knoxville Shimmy Mob and the UT Electroacoustic Ensemble will perform during the reception. Most of the works are for sale and may be purchased through the close of the exhibition.

Tennessee Artists Association: The Fall Juried Show: 43rd Fall Art Exhibition in the lower gallery
The Tennessee Artists Association (TAA) will feature original art by over 20 Tennessee artists including oils, watercolors, acrylics, pastels, photography, and mixed media.

The Arrowmont Experience in the Balcony gallery
The Arrowmont Experience will feature work by its current Artists-in-Residence, Max Adrian, Emily Culver, Elyse-Krista Mische, Paige Ward, and Xia Zhang, as well as a small selection of works from its permanent collection. This exhibition is presented in conjunction with Tennessee Craft Week, October 6-15, a collection of craft events and happenings across the state each October.

The Artists-in-Residence Program provides early career, self-directed artists time, space and support to experiment and develop a new body of work in a creative community environment. Each year, five artists of different media are selected for the eleven month program, which begins mid-June and continues through late May of the following year. Participants receive exhibition opportunities, teaching experience, professional development and a private studio. Arrowmont’s artists-in-residence will showcase contemporary, craft-based works using a range of media including ceramics, fiber, mixed media, drawing, and installation. The current Artists-in-Residence include:
Max Adrian – fiber artist creating three-dimensional sculptural forms: www.maxadrian.com
Emily Culver – multimedia jeweler: www.emily-culver.com
Elyse-Krista Mische – printmaking, drawing, and ceramics: www.lifepropaganda.com
Paige Ward – ceramic and sculpture artist: www.paigeward.com
Xia Zhang – multi-media artist creating work centered on the vessel: www.xiayzhang.com

Synthia Clark: Anthropomorphize in the display case
With a background in photojournalism, Synthia Clark is an award-winning photographer based in Knoxville with a focus towards what she calls “the little things.” To Synthia, these are the obscure, usually unnoticed details all around us. In this exhibition, she focuses on finding faces in our surroundings.

Richard Jansen: Painting with Light on the North Wall
Photography has been Richard Jansen’s passion since 1970 after he returned home from Vietnam. As a freelance photographer, his motivation comes from his surrounding world. Image: Courtesy Richard Jansen.

“It is what I believe to be a beautiful gift from God,” says Jansen.

Melanie Fetterolf: The Love of Nature in the Atrium
The Love of Nature Painting series reflects a spiritual belief by the artist that a higher power has a hand in all that we do. The paintings are begun by hand, then given to nature (rain), and finally finished again by the artist. The paintings are a study of the juxtaposition of color and line, an experiment in the use of texture, and the abstract, uncontrolled nature of falling rain. They reflect a need by the artist to let go of control and allow the random and chaotic nature of the technique to create beauty.

The exhibitions are on display at the Emporium Center, 100 S. Gay Street, in downtown Knoxville. Exhibition hours are Monday-Friday, 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM. For more information, please contact the Arts & Culture Alliance at (865) 523-7543, or visit the Web site at www.knoxalliance.com.


Johnson Architecture wins award

The Masonry Institute of Tennessee recently awarded Johnson Architecture the 2017 Merit Award in Masonry for the firm’s design of renovations at Maryville College’s iconic Anderson Hall. Johnson Architecture, Joseph Construction Company and masonry partner, F.L. Lay Masonry Contractors in Knoxville, worked collaboratively to ensure that the masonry design maintained the integrity of the historic brick building that has long been recognized as an anchor of the campus.

“We knew from historical records that the original brick was fired on campus in the late 1800s,” said Daryl Johnson, founder and president of Johnson Architecture. “Our challenge was to preserve the history of those bricks while repairing and replacing the damaged pieces while creating a state- of-the- art educational environment.”

The firm’s design of Anderson Hall at Maryville College protected historical features, such as wide staircases, arched entryways and high ceilings, while updating other amenities, including adding an elevator, security system, flexible classroom designs and 30 faculty offices. Photo submitted.

“As we designed each new amenity, we ensured that the original construction of the building was acknowledged,” Johnson said. “We framed a small section of the interior wall to expose brick, allowing visitors to see the original construction.”

Since Anderson Hall’s reopening in 2015, Johnson Architecture has earned several accolades for the project, including the Blount County Historic Trust Design Award in 2015 and both the Knox Heritage East Tennessee Preservation Award and East Tennessee Historical Society Award of Distinction in 2016.


Art Market seeks artists

Knoxville’s Art Market Gallery is currently accepting applications for a Sunday, August 27, 2017 membership jury. Acceptance for membership is determined by a jury of six active gallery members and is based on the quality of the applicant’s work; the applicant’s ability to be involved in a cooperative effort; as well as, the needs of the gallery.

Patrons enjoy visiting the Art Market Gallery in downtown Knoxville during a recent First Friday celebration, a city-wide event with open house opportunities at local businesses. Photo by Celebrate Knoxville.

Currently the gallery is accepting applications from artists in ​2D & 3D media​. Prospective members may deliver four pieces of their work and completed application form with $30 jury fee to the gallery at 422 South Gay Street in downtown Knoxville.

Delivery may be made 11:00 am – 5:30 pm Tuesday, August 22nd through Saturday, August 26th, 2017.

Instructions and an application form are available at www.artmarketgallery.net​.


Gilded Age on display

KNOXVILLE—The McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, opens the new exhibition “Fish Forks and Fine Furnishings: Consumer Culture in the Gilded Age,” on May 26, 2017.

The American Gilded Age, defined in the exhibition as 1870-1900, saw rapid growth in mass manufacturing, trade and travel—all of which gave Americans greater access to, and interest in, goods from around the world.

From fish forks and fashionable dress to furniture and fine china, the exhibition explores the personal and household objects that served as visible symbols of wealth, power and social class. The 100-plus objects in the exhibit point to the great changes that were occurring in America at the time, and also to our continuing preoccupation with the objects we choose to buy, wear and display. Image: Three-piece Afternoon Dress, c. 1880s, American, maker unknown. Cotton, velvet, silk. Gift of G.P. Gaut, 1947. Photo courtesy McClung Museum.

“The period’s fixation on wearing the right dress or setting an elegant table is no different than today’s focus on having the right style for one’s home or consuming the right foods or status bag as dictated by Pinterest, celebrities or the thousands of lifestyle gurus that all seem to have blogs and personal brands,” said Catherine Shteynberg, museum assistant director. Shteynberg curated the exhibit with curatorial assistant Melinda Narro.

The exhibit will include an installation of Knoxville native Frederick Bonham’s parlor in the Plaza Hotel in New York City, period dress and accessories, an array of unusual serving utensils and a formal dining table arrangement, and imported goods from across the world. Objects were collected by area families and come from the McClung Museum’s permanent collections, the UT Special Collections Library and the Museum of East Tennessee History.

The McClung Museum is located at 1327 Circle Park Drive. Museum admission is free, and the museum’s hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to Saturday and 1 to 5 p.m. on Sundays. Groups may schedule tours by calling 865-974-2144 or emailing museum@utk.edu.

Free two-hour museum parking passes are available from the parking information booth at the entrance to Circle Park Drive on weekdays by request. Free parking is available on Circle Park Drive on a first-come, first-served basis on weekends. Free public transportation to the museum is also available via the Knoxville Trolley Vol Line.

For more information about the McClung Museum and its collections and exhibits, visit mcclungmuseum.utk.edu.


Knox Heritage releases endangered list

KNOXVILLE, TENN. – Knox Heritage will announce its 2017 list of the most endangered historic buildings and places in Knoxville and Knox County on Monday, May 15, 2017 at 11:00 a.m. The announcement will take place at Knoxville High School, 101 E. Fifth Avenue. The former Knoxville High School was itself on the Fragile 15 list from 2010 until 2013 and is currently being restored.

Every May during National Preservation Month, Knox Heritage releases its list of the most endangered historic buildings and places in Knox County to inform the public and local leaders about the plight of significant historic resources. Often, the endangered buildings and places are representative of issues that endanger other centerpieces of our heritage across the community.

The historic places included on the list are selected by the Knox Heritage Board of Directors from nominations received from members of Knox Heritage and the general public. The list provides a work plan for the organization over the next 12 months. Preservation strategies are developed for each site on the list and can include working with current property owners, government officials, citizens and/or potential new owners to preserve these important parts of Knox County’s heritage.

Knox Heritage is committed to acting as an advocate for the endangered properties we identify each year. We invite the community to join us in our efforts to save our endangered heritage through advocacy and action. Knox Heritage preserves, restores and transforms historic places. For everyone. Forever. The nonprofit organization was founded in 1974 and now serves the entire 16-county Knoxville region.

For more information visit www.knoxheritage.org.


Broadway Studios call for artists

KNOXVILLE, TN – Broadway Studios and Gallery presents an open call to artists for the Music Show, an art competition based on the theme of music and what it means to the artist. All different types of interpretations are welcome. The art is judged on creativity and execution of the concept presented. Winners will be awarded cash prizes on First Friday, June 2, 2017 at 6pm. Doors open at 5pm.

Carl Gombert, art professor of Maryville College, will jury the show. You can learn about Carl at www.carlgombert.com.

All reasonable entries are accepted and each entry costs $5 each with a maximum of 3 entries per person.

All media is accepted. The only requirement is that all 2D must be framed with a wire ready to hang.

Drop off dates for artwork are Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, May, 25, 26 and 27th from 11am-7pm.

Winners will be awarded cash prizes on “First” Friday, June 2, 2017 at 6pm. Doors open at 5pm.

Parking is easy and on site. Light refreshments will be served.

Broadway Studios and Gallery is located at 1127 N Broadway, Knoxville, TN 37917.

Regular business hours are Thursday-Saturday 11am-7pm.

Broadway Studios and Gallery (BSG) is a collective of 10 artists working in individual studios under one roof. BSG hosts a new exhibit every month beginning on every First Friday of the month. The month long exhibit is free to the public. BSG also operates a retail space and individual artists teach in their own studios.

For more informations call Jessica Gregory at 865-556-8676.


Magnolia chosen for parade route

KNOXVILLE , TN – On Sunday, May 21, 2017 Cattywampus Puppet Council will bring Knoxville its first-ever giant puppet parade, The Appalachian Puppet Pageant, as part of this spring’s Open Streets in East Knoxville. Parade Line up is at 1pm on the southwest corner of Magnolia Ave and Chestnut. The parade will commence at 2pm, kicking off Open Streets, and process down the entire Open Streets route, roughly 1.2 miles. Participation in the parade is free and open to people of all ages.

The Appalachian Puppet Pageant is an East Tennessee inspired community arts parade. It will bring together members of all ages and backgrounds to celebrate the ecology and culture of the region through visual and performance art, and feature puppets up to 12 feet tall. Community members are invited to craft giant puppets, masks, and costumes that are rooted in the local ecology and stories of this region, as well as the culture of love, creativity, and mutual dependence we wish to foster in southern Appalachia.

Cattywampus Puppet Council has spent the past four months preparing for the parade, hosting multiple free giant puppet making workshops in Knoxville and working one on one with several community groups, helping them to make creations for the parade. These groups include the Birdhouse Community Center, Centro Hispano, the Vestal Boys and Girls Club, FYI Peer Educator Program, and The Carpetbag Theatre, amongst others.

Cattywampus Puppet Council was founded in 2014 by local artists Rachel Milford and Shelagh Leutwiler. They are a registered non-profit corporation in the state of Tennessee and are fiscally sponsored through Community Shares. The mission of Cattywampus is to strengthen community and promote play through the puppetry arts. They do this through creating original shows, workshops, and puppet parades, involving members of the community of all ages and backgrounds. Their goal is to foster dialogue, laughter, wonder, and healing along the way. More information about Cattywampus is available at http://www.cattywampuspuppetcouncil.com.


Knoxville Symphony hosts Show House

East Tennessee residents and visitors are invited to collect home decorating tips and inspiration at the 30th annual Knoxville Symphony League ShowHouse, which will be open until May 10, 2017.

The 4,510-square- foot home is located in a new subdivision on Artisan Row off Westland Drive and features the handiwork of 13 of the area’s most prestigious local designers and artisans. The Symphony ShowHouse will be open Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., and Sunday, 1-5 p.m. Single tickets to tour the house are $15, while a season pass is $25.

The Foxhollow Goodson smart home In the newly developed neighborhood is wired for all smart home capabilities, including intuitive thermostat and panel to control all functions of the home. The home also features a master suite with spacious custom closets, formal dining room, great room with two-story ceilings, large patio with exquisitely manicured courtyard and chef-grade kitchen. This home highlights the juxtaposition of sleek industrial features and reclaimed wood.

“The Knoxville Symphony League has been organizing and sharing show houses with the community for the past 30 years,” said Rhonda Webster, chair of the Knoxville Symphony League ShowHouse, which benefits the Knoxville Symphony Orchestra. “We hope everyone will visit the Symphony Show House and enjoy how unique and inspiring this particular home is while also being able to support the Knoxville Symphony Orchestra.”

The on-site symphony gift shop also will offer decorating ideas and an assortment of items for sale. A portion of the items sold in the gift shop will benefit the Knoxville Symphony Orchestra.

Guests will experience live music at various times while visiting the Symphony ShowHouse. Complimentary parking and shuttle services are available at First Church of God, located at 6708 Westland Drive.

The following local designers and artisans are involved with the 2017 Symphony ShowHouse:

Jeffrey Hansen and Linda Cox of Bill Fox Furniture

Scott Bishop of Westwood Antique & Design Market

Jeff Heiskell of Ethan Allen Design Center

Mitzi Mayer of Perpendicular Design

Gail Reed of Trend and Traditions

Susan Gates of The Velvet Pug

Joyce Simms of The Painted Pig

Kim Jackson and Meg Troutman of O.P. Jenkins

Janet Greer of Friedman’s Appliances

Regina Turner, artist

Tom Cover, artist

 

The Knoxville Symphony League (KSL) is a guild of volunteers who organize fundraising events to benefit the Knoxville Symphony Orchestra, specifically the education and community partnerships programs, including scholarships for students involved in the Knoxville Symphony Youth Orchestras. The Knoxville Symphony League hosts three pillar fundraisers each season, including the annual Symphony Ball, the Elegant Dining Series and the Symphony ShowHouse. These events fund KSO programs that provide cultural and educational outreach in the community.

 


Art sale at Knoxville Museum of Art

The Guild of the Knoxville Museum of Art presents Artists on Location exhibition and art sale Saturday, April 29, 2017 from 6-8:30pm. This event is free and open to the public.

Local and regional artists have been invited to showcase their talent by producing work out of doors around Knoxville between April 26 and 29. The public is invited to watch as the artists paint around town. (Locations will be listed on knoxart.org in mid-April.) Artists will then exhibit and sell those works at the Awards Reception and Art Sale on Saturday, April 29.

North Carolina Artist Jim Carson is the Featured Artist and Juror for this year’s Artists on Location event. Carson has received a number of awards in both local and national shows, and gives workshops throughout the United States. Carson is known for his creative color balance and bold and expressive brushwork. He is a member of Plein Air Painters of the South East, an associate member of the Oil Painters of America, and a Signature Member of the American Impressionist Society.

Jim Carson, “Flowers in the Hamptons;” image courtesy Knoxville Museum of Art.

The Knoxville Museum of Art celebrates the art and artists of East Tennessee, presents new art and new ideas, serves and educates diverse audiences, and enhances Knoxville’s quality of life. The museum is located in downtown Knoxville at 1050 World’s Fair Park and is open to the public Tuesday through Saturday 10am–5pm, and Sunday 1pm-5pm. Admission and parking are free.

For more information, contact Angela Thomas at 865.934.2034 or visit www.knoxart.org.


Museum celebrates TN Marble

In conjunction with the feature exhibition Rock of Ages: East Tennessee’s Marble Industry  the Museum of East Tennessee History is inviting public participation in its ongoing efforts to study and document items made from marble quarried in East Tennessee, including  photographs, documents, and stories relating to marble history and workers. Anyone with relevant information is encouraged to bring these to a Tennessee Marble Documentation Day on Saturday, April 15, 2017 at the East Tennessee History Center, 601 S. Gay Street, Knoxville.

East Tennessee marble is prized by architects, builders, and sculptors for its structural and decorative properties. The marble industry was once an important sector of East Tennessee’s economy. By the mid-1850s, East Tennessee marble from Knox County had been chosen for the interiors of the Tennessee State Capitol and marble from Hawkins County was being installed inside the new House and Senate wings of the United States Capitol. In the decades that followed, East Tennessee’s varicolored marble was sought by architects for the interiors of a variety of public buildings: state capitol buildings, courthouses, city halls. Tennessee marble would soon also be ordered for high traffic railroad terminal flooring across the United States and Canada.

Reminders of the once prominent Tennessee marble industry can be seen today, in late 19th, early 20th century buildings on Gay Street and other corners of downtown, in building facades, steps and entranceways, and interior lobbies. The Knoxville Post Office and Federal Building on Main Street is a particularly fine example dating from the 1930s. And Knoxville, a city that has won national recognition for historic preservation, continues to embrace its marble heritage in modern buildings such as the expansion of the U.S. Custom House into the East Tennessee History Center and the exterior marble of the Knoxville Museum of Art.

The event is from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m., with a special panel discussion taking place from 10:30-11:30 a.m. The panel will feature Susan Knowles, Ph.D., of the Center of historic Preservation, Middle Tennessee State University, as moderator, as well as members of four families who were prominent in the marble business—Sonja Jones, Finbarr Saunders, Jean Vestal, and Beth Wolf, who will talk about their family’s experiences relating to the marble industry.

The program is free and open to the public. Visitors will also be invited to tour the museum for free and enjoy the Rock of Ages exhibition. The Museum of East Tennessee History is operated by the East Tennessee Historical Society and is located in the East Tennessee History Center at 601 S. Gay Street in downtown Knoxville. For further information, call (865) 215-8829 or visit www.eastTNhistory.org.

 


Knoxville Puppet Parade is May 21

On Sunday, May 21, 2017 Cattywampus Puppet Council will bring Knoxville its first-ever giant puppet parade, The Appalachian Puppet Pageant, as part of this spring’s Open Streets in East Knoxville.

The Appalachian Puppet Pageant will be an East Tennessee inspired community puppet parade. It will bring together members of all ages and backgrounds to celebrate the ecology and culture of the region through visual and performance art, and feature puppets up to 12 feet tall. Community members will craft individual and collaborative pieces, and create a living, breathing art exhibit in the streets of Knoxville. Participation in the parade is free and open to people of all ages.

Both Cattywampus and Open Streets invite the community to come play together. From 2-6 PM that Sunday, Knoxvillians are invited to walk, parade, bike, jog or dance their way through the streets. Magnolia Ave., from Randolph St. to North Chestnut St., with a small loop onto East Depot Ave. will be closed to all motorized traffic, allowing revelers a day of playing, exercising, socializing, and shopping all on foot or two wheels. The parade will kick off the event at 2pm and traverse the entire route. Open Streets Knoxville, hosted by Bike Walk Knoxville with support from the City of Knoxville, Knoxville Regional TPO, Visit Knoxville and Knox County, aims to promote physical activity and community interaction during this free community event.

To prepare for the Appalachian Puppet Pageant, Cattywampus has been holding free puppet building workshops throughout the community. Workshop dates and resources for learning how to build a giant puppet for the parade can be found on Cattywampus’s website. The group is also looking for volunteers for the day of the parade, as well as donations of supplies and financial support. Information about donating or getting involved with the parade is available on the group’s website at https://cattywampuspuppetcouncil.com/appalachian-puppet-pageant/

Open Streets Knoxville is still looking for Sponsors and Activity Providers as well. Activity providers are asked to provide programming, with emphasis on interactive, fun activities that promote physical activity, health, the outdoors, community, and safety. The free and family-friendly activities hosted by activity providers help make Open Streets Knoxville an enriching and fun experience for participants. To find out more, visit www.openstreetsknoxville.com.

Cattywampus Puppet Council was founded in 2014 by local artists Rachel Milford and Shelagh Leutwiler. They are a registered non-profit corporation in the state of Tennessee and are fiscally sponsored through Community Shares. The mission of Cattywampus is to strengthen community and promote play through the puppetry arts. They do this through creating original shows, workshops, and puppet parades, involving members of the community of all ages and backgrounds. Their goal is to foster dialogue, laughter, wonder, and healing along the way. More information about Cattywampus is available at http://www.cattywampuspuppetcouncil.com.


Knox Makers share work space

Knoxville Mayor Rogero is scheduled to cut the metal ribbon to kick off the grand opening of Knox Makers new community-oriented makerspace on Saturday, April 1, 2017 at 11 AM. The event, located at 116 Childress Street, is open to the public and will include tours of the new workshop spaces and displays of projects made using the tools in the space that consist of 3D printing, lasercutting, wood working, metal working, and more.

Knox Makers is a place for the Knoxville area’s engineers, artists, hobbyists, innovators, educators and entrepreneurs to work and play. It is a technology and art collective dedicated to the promotion of creativity enabled and informed by science. Knox Makers provides lectures, workshops, and outreach programs that inspire and educate both members and the general public. The nearly 7,000 square foot workshop enables projects ranging from making your own costumes to building your own furniture to designing your own electronics.

“Knox Makers is more than just tools and a workshop,“ says Knox Makers President, Doug Laney. “We have almost 100 members who come together and share what they know. By combining skills and working together, they can make things that they wouldn‘t be able to make alone. That collaboration brings a real sense of community to the space. Being a part of that community is the best thing about Knox Makers.”

The Grand Opening will begin with the ribbon cutting at 11AM, with tours and demonstrations continuing until 4PM. Knox Makers will be signing up new members and selling t-shirts during the event. Mean Mama’s Burgers and Such along with Big O’s Famous Barbecue food trucks will be on site serving lunch.


ETPA seeks property nominations

Knoxville – The East Tennessee Preservation Alliance (ETPA) is now accepting nominations for the 2017 East Tennessee Endangered 8, a listing of the eight most threatened historic sites in our region. The objective of the list is to inform our communities about the real threat of losing these important sites to development, demolition or lack of maintenance as well as the value of what will be lost if action isn’t taken soon to avoid their destruction. Nominations are due by March 30, 2017 and are accepted for sites at least 50 years old and located in Anderson, Blount, Campbell, Claiborne, Cocke, Grainger, Hamblen, Jefferson, Knox, Loudon, Monroe, Morgan, Roane, Scott, Sevier and Union counties. The 2017 East Tennessee Endangered 8 will be announced on May 1, 2017 to kick-off National Preservation Month. The nomination form and more information is available online at www.knoxheritage.org/ETPA.

ETPA has presented a list of endangered heritage sites in our region since 2010. The organization seeks to develop preservation strategies for each property included on the list. Endangered properties can be saved by working with property owners, developers, government officials, citizens and local historic organizations to find preservation solutions that work. Past endangered heritage lists can be found online at www.knoxheritage.org/ETPA.

About the East Tennessee Preservation Alliance

The East Tennessee Preservation Alliance works to preserve the structures and places with historic or cultural significance in Anderson, Blount, Campbell, Claiborne, Cocke, Grainger, Hamblen, Jefferson, Knox, Loudon, Monroe, Morgan, Roane, Scott, Sevier, and Union counties.

ETPA partners with Knox Heritage to serve as the regional arm for preservation activities in the 16 counties mentioned above. The ETPA board of directors is comprised of local leadership from each of the 16 counties. ETPA advocates on issues of major importance to historic preservation, collaborates with other organizations with similar interests and goals, works to educate the public on the many benefits of historic preservation and actively seeks strategies for addressing challenging historic preservation issues in the region.


Orchid Awards presented March 7

Keep Knoxville Beautiful will host the annual Orchids Beautification Awards at the Standard at 416 West Jackson Avenue on March 7, 2017 from 6:00 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. The deadline for purchasing tickets is this Friday, March 3.

From 6:00 until 7:00, there will be a complimentary beer and wine reception with a floral beer specially brewed and donated to the event by Balter Beerworks. During the reception, guests may bid on silent auction items donated by local companies such as Bliss, Smoky Mountain Vintage Lumber, TVB, Knox Whiskey Works, Ijams Nature Center, Meadowsweet Massage and Wellness, Knoxville Symphony Orchestra, and many more.

Keep Knoxville Beautiful’s three goals to promote a “cleaner, greener, more beautiful Knoxville” will be highlighted by a photo-booth, a beer garden, and with a live painting by muralist Perry Hodson. Guests will enjoy live music by the Old City Buskers.

The ceremony and dinner will begin at 7:00 and will be emceed by Dino Cartwright of WVLT. Keep Knoxville Beautiful will announce its next Community of the Year, the area of Knox County where it will focus the majority of its efforts during the 2017-18 year.

Gale Fulton, Director of the School of Landscape Architecture at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville will be the night’s guest speaker. Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero will also be in attendance, and will present the first Felicia Harris Hoehne Award. Dino will present the Orchids Awards to a winner from each of the following six categories: Outdoor Space, Public Art, Restaurant/Café/Bar/Brewery, New Architecture, Environmental Stewardship, and Redesign/Reuse. Finally, Tom Salter, Solid Waste Director at Knox County, will close the night by presenting the Mary Lou Horner Award to a previous Orchid winner that has been improved or remains “orchid-worthy.”

A list of all nominees can be found at http://www.keepknoxvillebeautiful.org/orchid-awards.

The deadline for purchasing tickets is this Friday, March 3. Individual tickets are $85 each and tables for 10 are $750. Tickets can be purchased at www.keepknoxvillebeautiful.org/orchid-awards/. All proceeds benefit Keep Knoxville Beautiful’s programs.

Keep Knoxville Beautiful is a local non-profit with a mission to promote a cleaner, greener, and more beautiful community.


Knoxville’s Chris Hornsby goes solo

KNOXVILLE, TENN.— Chris Hornsby, a Tennessee artist and president of Hornsby Brand Design, a Knoxville-based branding design firm, was selected for his first solo exhibit at the Customs House Museum and Cultural Center in Clarksville, Tenn. This show runs from Mar. 7 until May 4, 2017, and features 10 pieces of artwork from his “Fracture” series, which range in size from 43″ x 43″ to 90″ x 90″ and consists of 98 canvases. The Opening Reception is slated for Thurs., 5 p.m., Mar. 9, 2017.

Chris Hornsby has shown his work in a variety of states and venues, including the nation’s art capital New York City, but the one-man show at the Customs House Museum and Cultural Center is his first solo exhibit. Photo submitted.

Hornsby said, “Art is a personal passion of mine of which I’m grateful to express both in my branding design business as well as in my fine art pieces. To be able to show and share my artwork is always quite an honor, but to have a one-man show in one of the state’s leading fine art museums is something that I’m very excited about.”

Inaugurated in 1898, the Customs House Museum is located in the heart of historic downtown Clarksville and is Tennessee’s second largest general museum with more than 35,000 square feet of exhibit space, 20,000 permanent pieces, and hundreds of thousands of visitors.

Hornsby’s “Fracture” series was born out of the artist’s exploration of dark and light fractured imagery used to express his vision of struggle, pain, defeat, and victory. Based on the complex interaction between control, contradiction, and humanity’s violent struggle to succeed, Hornsby experiments with shapes, mediums, ideas, and positions, birthing images that are unexpected, revealing, and exciting. He describes the rearrangement and juxtapositions of his design forms as expressions of raw emotional openings and “an evolution of experimentation and discovery.”

Hornsby has been applying his artistic skills in a variety of capacities after earning a BFA in graphic design from the University of Georgia. He has garnered more than 100 creative awards, been inducted into the Knoxville’s American Advertising Federation’s Hall of Fame, as well as being published in numerous prestigious design annuals such as Print and How.

In addition to his dedication to a successful career, Hornsby proactively gives back to the community both monetarily and through donations of his time and talent to various regional, state, and international non-profits.

In his off time, he exercises his creative talent by continually exhibiting his sculptures and paintings, including a recent exclusive show in the Brooklyn Waterfront Artists Coalition’s “Black and White Show.” This show, of which his artwork was selected from 1,358 nationwide entries, garnered him a cash prize and an honorable mention awarded by NYC’s art elite, Christiane Paul, the Curator of Media Arts at the prestigious Whitney Museum of American Art.

Hornsby is also being featured in the April 2017 issue of Nashville Arts Magazine.


KKB presents 2017 Orchid Awards

Keep Knoxville Beautiful will host its annual Orchid Awards dinner on March 7, 2017 at 6:00 at The Standard, 416 W. Jackson Avenue. The evening will include live music, live painting by muralist Perry Dodson, a silent auction with complimentary beer and wine reception, dinner, and the awards ceremony. Gale Fulton, Director of the School of Landscape Architecture at the University of Tennessee, is the speaker.

Awards will be presented to winners in six different categories: Environmental Stewardship, New Architecture, Outdoor Spaces, Public Art, Redesign/Reuse, and Restaurant/Café/Bar/Brewery.

“Each year the list of nominees reveals a snapshot of the progress and values of our developing city,” stated Keep Knoxville Beautiful Executive Director Patience Melnik. “The Redesign/Reuse category continues to be our strongest, with projects exemplifying the continued rebirth of downtown Knoxville. We were also very pleased to see a big jump in the number of strong contenders for the Public Art award. And while there were only three Environmental Stewardship nominees, they are large or culturally significant projects. As an organization with an environmental mission, we are especially excited about these additions to our community.”

The nominees for New Architecture are the Local Motors Microfactory, the Market Square Restroom Facilities, Mountain Commerce Bank, the Natalie Haslam Music Center, and the Student Union at the University of Tennessee. The nominees for Outdoor Spaces are the Baker Creek Preserve, the Blueberry Falls Extension at the University of Tennessee, Hank Rappe Playground at Lakeshore Park, the Old City Gardens, the Secret Garden at the Knoxville Botanical Garden Arboretum, and Suttree Landing Park.

The nominees for Public Art are the Alliance Brewing Company mural, the Chilhowee Park mural, the Jerry’s Artarama mural, Pat Summit Plaza, The Emporium Center Underground Mural, and the Third Creek Greenway mural.

The nominees for Redesign/Reuse are Anderson and Rahman Dermatology, Geo Hair Lab, the Locust Street Pedestrian Bridge, Lululemon Athletica, Patricia Nash Designs, the Powell Airplane Service Station, the Depot at Powell Station, Premier Surgical Associates at Papermill, The Daniel, The Mill and Mine, the Kennedy-Walker-Baker-Sherill House, the 6th Avenue Warehouses, and the 1894 Saloon Building.

The nominees for Restaurant/Café/Bar/Brewery are: A Dopo Sourdough Pizza, Alliance Brewing Company, Balter Beerworks, J.C. Holdway, Juice Bar in Market Square, K Brew, Lonesome Dove, Remedy Coffee, Schulz Bräu Brewing Company, and Wild Love Bakehouse.

Additionally, The Mary Lou Horner Beautification Award will be granted to a former Orchid Award winner whose property remains Orchid-worthy.

Keep Knoxville Beautiful is honored to have the East Tennessee Community Design Center serve as judges of the dozens of award nominations.

The nominees for Environmental Stewardship are the Beardsley Farm Education Center, the City of Knoxville Public Works Complex, and the Joint Institute for Advanced Materials.

For tickets, please visit www.keepknoxvillebeautiful.org/orchid-awards/

All proceeds benefit Keep Knoxville Beautiful’s programs.


New works displayed at Emporium

The Arts & Culture Alliance is pleased to present five new exhibitions at the Emporium Center in downtown Knoxville from March 3-31, 2017. A public reception will take place on Friday, March 3, from 5:00-9:00 PM to which the public is invited to meet the artists and view the artwork. Most of the works are for sale and may be purchased through the close of the exhibition. The First Friday reception also features music and dance by Pasion Flamenca from 6:00-6:30 PM and live music by Swing Serenade from 7:00-9:00 PM. Complimentary hors d’oeuvres will be available.

Abingdon Arts Depot – Juried Members Exhibition in the lower gallery
The Arts & Culture Alliance is pleased to present a new exhibition of mixed media works by 27 members of the Depot Artists Association in Abingdon, Virginia.

Image: Jose Roberto: The Art of Surrealism in the Balcony gallery
“When I was a little boy, I put my hand in a meat grinder and lost most of my left arm,” says artist Jose Roberto. That was the beginning of his life as an artist.

“The loneliness and isolation I experienced during childhood now allow me to delve into the deepest realms of my emotions and release them at will onto the image,” Roberto says. “My subjects are usually emotionally-charged themes brought about by my own life experiences.”

The exhibit also includes new work by Coral Grace Turner in the display case; “New Beginning” by Joe Bracco on the North Wall; and Vintage Re-Inventions: Steampunk Creations by Eric Holstine, Jason Lambert, and Jason Edwards in the Atrium.

The exhibitions are on display at the Emporium Center, 100 S. Gay Street, in downtown Knoxville. Exhibition hours are Monday-Friday, 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM. For more information, please contact the Arts & Culture Alliance at (865) 523-7543, or visit the Web site at www.knoxalliance.com.


Design Center names board members

Knoxville, TN – The East Tennessee Community Design Center (ETCDC) has announced that four community leaders have been named as new board directors. With the inclusion of Lane E. McCarty, granddaughter of the founder, the late architect Bruce McCarty, ETCDC adds a third generation to this legacy.

The new directors, each serving three year terms, are:

-Dwane Dishner, Dishner Design

-Alicia Griego Gast, First Tennessee Bank, Private Client Relationship Manager

-Lane E. McCarty, TVA – Office of General Counsel (Bruce McCarty’s granddaughter. Her father, Doug McCarty, is an emeritus board director.)

-Mary Beth Robinson, Place Synergy

“The Design Center has served East Tennessee for many years, through the work of strong, committed volunteers. Our new Directors are great examples of this ‘volunteer spirit’ at work,” Rick Blackburn, board president, said.

Besides Blackburn, board officers elected for 2017 are Nathan Honeycutt, AIA, first vice president; Katharine Pearson Criss, second vice president; Jan Evridge, treasurer/past president, and Sheryl Ely, secretary.

Founded in 1970 through the vision of the late architect Bruce McCarty, ETCDC is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to make East Tennessee a better place to live and work by bringing professional design and planning assistance to communities and organizations lacking resources. The Community Design Center offers its services through the pro bono contributions of area architects, landscape architects, planners, engineers and other design professionals. ETCDC has assisted in as diverse range of projects, from traffic calming in neighborhoods to planning for Knoxville’s new urban wilderness. ETCDC serves Knox and the surrounding 15 counties of the East Tennessee Development District.

Additional information is available at http://www.etcdc.org.


KMA presents Virtual Views exhibit

The Knoxville Museum of Art announces an exciting new exhibition, Virtual Views: Digital Art from the Thoma Foundation, running February 3 through April 16, 2017. This electronic media exhibition is presented in conjunction with the 2017 Big Ears music festival.

Drawn from the extensive Chicago-based collection of Carl and Marilynn Thoma, Virtual Views explores the growing importance of electronic new media in contemporary art as seen in the work of artists who are pioneers in the use of LEDs (light-emitting diodes), LCD (liquid crystal display), and computer-driven imagery. The exhibition features nine electronic works comprised of synthetic materials and powered by digital technology, yet the rhythms and patterns of its imagery are derived from nature. The featured artists include Jim Campbell, Craig Dorety, John Gerrard, Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, Alan Rath, Daniel Rozin, Björn Schülke, Jennifer Steinkamp, and Leo Villareal.

Craig Dorety (Oakland 1973; lives and works in San Francisco) Offset Circles—Yellow Flowering Tree Against Blue Sky, 2014, custom electronics, alupanel, animated LEDs, 24 x 24 x 3 inches.

The Knoxville Museum of Art celebrates the art and artists of East Tennessee, presents new art and new ideas, serves and educates diverse audiences, and enhances Knoxville’s quality of life. The museum is located in downtown Knoxville at 1050 World’s Fair Park and is open to the public Tuesday through Saturday 10am–5pm, and Sunday 1pm-5pm. Admission and parking are free. For more information, contact Angela Thomas at 865.934.2034 or visit www.knoxart.org.


Puppet group awarded art grant

Cattywampus Puppet Council has been awarded a prestigious Burning Man Global Art Grant to help produce the Appalachian Puppet Pageant as part of the Knoxville, Tennessee 2017 Dogwood Arts Festival. The Pageant will take place on Saturday, April 29, 2017 and preparations are already underway.

The Appalachian Puppet Pageant is an East Tennessee inspired community puppet parade. It will bring together members of all ages and backgrounds to celebrate the ecology and culture of the region through visual and performance art, and feature puppets up to 12 feet tall. Community members will craft individual and collaborative pieces, and create a living, breathing art exhibit in the streets of Knoxville. Participation in the parade is free and open to people of all ages.

To prepare for the Appalachian Puppet Pageant, Cattywampus is holding a series of free workshops on giant puppet construction, and interest has been so overwhelming that the first two have reached capacity. An additional workshop has been added for March 9, 2017 at the Muse Knoxville for interested individuals and community groups. Resources for learning how to build giant puppets for the parade can also be found on the Cattywampus Puppet Council website. The group is also looking for volunteers for the day of the parade, as well as donations of supplies and financial support.

Cattywampus Puppet Council was founded in 2014 by local artists Rachel Milford and Shelagh Leutwiler. They are a registered non-profit corporation in the state of Tennessee and are fiscally sponsored through Community Shares. The mission of Cattywampus is to build community and promote play through the puppetry arts. They do this through creating original shows, workshops, and puppet parades, involving members of the community of all ages and backgrounds. Their goal is to foster dialogue, laughter, wonder, and healing along the way.

More information about Cattywampus is available at www.cattywampuspuppetcouncil.com.


Sprecher art on display at KMA

The Knoxville Museum of Art announces a new contemporary exhibition, Outside In, by Jered Sprecher from January 27 through April 16, 2017.

Sprecher lives in Knoxville and is a professor with the University of Tennessee’s School of Art. He enjoys a growing national reputation as one of the leading representative of a generation of contemporary painters dedicated to the exploration and revitalization of abstraction. He describes himself as a “hunter and gatherer,” pulling his imagery from such disparate sources as wallpaper, graffiti, architecture, cut gemstones, and x-rays.

Outside In reflects the dynamic range of Sprecher’s recent practice in terms of format, scale, imagery, and process. It also includes several new works configured in a provocatively informal manner designed to reference a space that is central to human domestic life since the dawn of time: the living room. The Study (2013), for instance, depicts an abstracted frontal view of a fireplace entrance defined in broad horizontal strokes in an icy palette that presents the original image in a strange new light. The painting reflects the artist’s examination of parallels between ancient domestic traditions in which the fireplace was a mesmerizing light environment that in contemporary life has been replaced by the ubiquitous digital screen.

Jered Sprecher, “Trees Walking”, 2015. Oil on linen, 72 x 60 inches.

The Knoxville Museum of Art celebrates the art and artists of East Tennessee, presents new art and new ideas, serves and educates diverse audiences, and enhances Knoxville’s quality of life. The museum is located in downtown Knoxville at 1050 World’s Fair Park and is open to the public Tuesday through Saturday 10am–5pm, and Sunday 1pm-5pm. Admission and parking are free. For more information, contact Angela Thomas at 865.934.2034 or visit www.knoxart.org.


Art classes offered in Norris

Appalachian Arts Craft Center in Norris will be offering the following classes in January 2017: Landscape Painting with Sherry Smith, Dichoric Pendant with Donna Gryder, Pottery on the Wheel with Sandra McEntire, Handbuilding with Judy Brater, and Nuno Felted Scarf with Tone Haugen-Cogburn.

LANDSCAPE PAINTING, with Sherry Smith, Thursday, January 5, 12, 19, 26 and Feb 2 & 9, 6:00 – 9:00 p.m.
Have you ever wanted to paint a beautiful landscape, but didn’t think you could? Everyone can learn to paint! In these classes, students will explore the skills needed to create beautiful paintings.

DICHORIC PENDANT WORKSHOP, with Donna Gryder, Saturday, January 14, 1:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Nothing says fusing like the bling of dichroic glass. Here’s your chance to experience the sparkles and colors that only dichroic glass can offer. Each participant will make their own wearable masterpieces, in the form of up to 4 glass pendants, using a variety of fusible glass. Basic glass fusing information will be discussed. Pendants will be designed, cut and pieced together during class. The firing of the pendants will take place during the next few days, away from the Center.

POTTERY ON THE WHEEL, with Sandra McEntire, Monday, January 23, 30 and February 6, 13, 10:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. This will be a class that will concentrate on and review the four basics of wheel work: centering, opening, pulling up, and trimming. It will give the student more confidence in the throwing process. There will be four classes. Some wheel ability helpful but not required.

HANDBUILDING WORKSHOP, with Judy Brater, Two Fridays, January 27 and March 3, 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Judy Brater will be teaching a class that shows how to alter bowls and vases by adding coils, and how to texture them using a variety of pottery stamps and tools. Bring three leather hard formed bowls, any size or shape and one vase shaped vessel. Also bring any texturing tools, towels, extra clay needed for coils and altering forms.

NUNO FELTED SCARF WORKSHOP, with Tone Haugen-Cogburn, Saturday, January 28, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. See how silk fabric and wool rowing merge to make a colorful nuno felted scarf. Soap, water, bubblewrap and your two hands are simple tools you will use for this wet felting technique. All artist skill levels are welcome.

For additional information call 865-494-9854 or visit www.applachianarts.net.


IJAMS opens new adaptive dock

Great news for sports lovers who have physical challenges! This month Ijams, the City of Knoxville, and Catalyst Sports celebrated the opening of a new adaptive dock at the Ijams River Landing on the Tennessee River.

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In addition to expanding paddling opportunities, the dock is the first step in Ijams offering adaptive recreation for individuals with physical challenges. Ijams plans to partner with Catalyst Sports to offer adaptive paddling programs in 2017. The nature center also recently purchased two adaptive kayaks.

The dock is free and open to the public. Motorized watercraft are not permitted. Future plans for the River Landing include new space for environmental education programs, as well as paddling rentals for those who do not have their own boards or boats.

In addition, Mead’s Quarry at Ijams has a creative new place visitors to lock up a bike or take a seat. The new bike racks and benches, created by artist Derek White of Bird on the Wire Studios, pay homage to the industrial history of the Ijams Quarries. White, along with the help of Ijams staff members, Ben Nanny and Jack Gress, and community members Kelly Brown, Gregory Tune, Claude Hardy, Duke Brown, and Noel Kuck, installed the one-of-a-kind gear-and-cog design near Mead’s Quarry Lake on Dec. 19, 2016.

 


New exhibits at The Emporium

The Arts & Culture Alliance is pleased to present three new exhibitions at the Emporium Center in downtown Knoxville from January 6-27, 2017. A public reception will take place on Friday, January 6, from 5:00-9:00 PM to which the public is invited to meet the artists and view the artwork. Most of the works are for sale and may be purchased through the close of the exhibition. Complimentary hors d’oeuvres will be available.

The O’Connor Senior Center Painters present a new exhibition of more than 40 watercolors, oils, and acrylics entitled “Breaking Ground – What You Want to See” featuring more than ten artists.

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Members of the Appalachian Area Chapter of Blacksmiths are pleased to present an exhibition of fine, hand-forged architectural ironwork. Photo courtesy artist blacksmith Joe Babb.

The exhibition will include a variety of items for the home including gates, grills, sculpture, furniture, lighting, fireplace equipment, and door hardware. The show will be of interest to the general public as well as interior designers, architects, and artists. Artist Blacksmiths include Joe Babb, Ron Nichols, Brad Greenwood, Ron Nichols, Mike Rose, and others.

With a goal of preserving and promoting the exciting art of blacksmithing, the Appalachian Area Chapter of Blacksmiths strives to educate and involve both men and women, young and old. AACB was founded in 1965 by Jud Nelson, Joe Humble, Joe Neely, A.P. Billingsley, and Bill Planzer. It is a nonprofit organization and an affiliate of the Artist-Blacksmith’s Association of North America.

The MLK Gallery of Arts Tribute will kick-off the 2017 King Week Celebration. The Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemorative Commission is partnering with the Arts & Culture Alliance of Greater Knoxville to provide this annual exhibition. The Galley of Arts Tribute is a juried exhibition developed to recognize local artists and most importantly to honor the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The exhibit will feature works by local artists reflecting the themes of Unity, Community, Love, Racial Reconciliation, Social Justice, and Civil Rights.

The exhibitions are on display at the Emporium Center, 100 S. Gay Street, in downtown Knoxville. Exhibition hours are Monday-Friday, 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Please note, the Emporium is closed January 16 for the holiday.

For more information, please contact the Arts & Culture Alliance at (865) 523-7543, or visit the Web site at www.knoxalliance.com.


Bliss Home expands into new market

Knoxville-based Bliss Home furniture store recently announced that the company is expanding and will open its first location in Louisville, Kentucky in Westport Village. It is the retailer’s first expansion outside of the Tennessee market. Bliss Home is expected to open its doors in Spring of 2017 in the site formerly occupied by Gattiland at 1108 Lyndon Lane in Louisville.

Bliss Home in Westport Village will feature 24,000 square feet of casual contemporary furniture for your living room, bedroom, dining room and office. They will also feature regional products, art and accessories. Bliss Home also has a staff of designers who can go on-site to revamp client homes through their In-Home Design program.

“We absolutely fell in love with Louisville during one of our many visits here. We have been so impressed with the southern hospitality of the tenants at Westport Village. It’s one of the main reasons we chose this location,” said owners and husband and wife team of Scott Schimmel and Lisa Sorensen. “Like our philosophy, Westport Village has a strong focus on a small store feel and a sense of community. This was an easy decision and we knew this was a market where we could build on our success and support our new neighbors at Westport Village.”

The couple opened the first of the Bliss stores in 2003 in Knoxville, Tennessee.


Five Points project hosts meeting

Knoxville’s Community Development Corporation (KCDC) will hold a public meeting to present a site plan for Phase 3 redevelopment of the Walter P. Taylor Homes and Dr. Lee L. Williams Senior Complex to Five Points’ residents and community stakeholders on Thursday, Dec. 8, 2016 at 5:30 p.m. at the Walter P. Taylor Boys & Girls Club, 317 McConnell St.

KCDC’s design team of Barber McMurry Architects in Knoxville and Urban Design Associates, based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, will present the site plan for Phase 3 of the Five Points Master Plan, which will include 34 duplex and triplex buildings located at Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue and McConnell Street. The 98 one-, two- and three-bedroom units will be constructed to reflect the design and fabric of the existing community.

“This is a very exciting next step of the Five Points revitalization project. The proposed phase will serve as the new ‘front porch’ to Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue,” KCDC Board of Commissioners Chair Dan Murphy said. “The site plan is designed to create neighborhood connectivity, outdoor community spaces and housing amenities that will enhance the Five Points community.”

Phase 3 of the plan will also include a new playground and in the center of the community, open green space and park with proposed historical markers. The greenway will be prepared adjacent to the proposed improved Kenner Avenue for future connection to the City of Knoxville greenway system.

The total cost of the Five Points revitalization project is approximately $85 million and is estimated to take place over 10 to 12 years. The City of Knoxville has dedicated $8 million over a 10-year period to the project.

Since 1936, KCDC has been dedicated to enhancing the quality of life for the citizens of Knoxville and Knox County. KCDC’s mission is to improve and transform neighborhoods and communities by providing quality affordable housing, advancing development initiatives and fostering self-sufficiency.

For more information, call 865-403- 1100 or visit http://www.kcdc.org.


Lecture offered on TN marble

(Knoxville, TN) “From the Archives: Finding East Tennessee’s Marble Story” is the subject of a lecture to be presented by Dr. Susan W. Knowles, Wednesday, December 7, 2016 at the East Tennessee History Center.

Her interest piqued by Tennessee marble she saw in the United States Capitol, Knowles set out to learn more about marble from the East Tennessee region and its use in buildings and monuments across the nation. The resulting research, images, and interviews became the subject of her doctoral dissertation and now form the basis of a feature exhibition Rock of Ages: East Tennessee’s Marble Industry, of which Knowles is the guest curator.

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East Tennessee marble is prized the world over. The exhibition explores the industry and offers a first-time look into the factors that launched the rock’s fame and crowned Knoxville as the Marble City. The beautiful exhibit features an array of artifacts, videos, and photographs showcasing the importance and diversity of East Tennessee’s marble industry. Lecture attendees are invited to tour the exhibition following the lecture

Susan W. Knowles is a graduate of the Public History program at MTSU, with an M.A. in Art History from Vanderbilt University, and a Master of Library Science degree from George Peabody College. She currently serves as the Digital Humanities Research Fellow for the Center for Historic Preservation at Middle Tennessee State University. Knowles served project curator for “Trials and Triumphs: Tennesseans’ Search for Citizenship, Community, and Opportunity,” a website and digital collection on the “Jim Crow” era in Tennessee. She is currently overseeing the graduate research assistants at MTSU and coordinating building the “Southern Places” online research collections, which document more than thirty years of field work at the Center for Historic Preservation.

The program is sponsored by Consolidated Nuclear Security, LLC and is and free and open to the public. The lecture will begin at noon at the East Tennessee History Center, 601 S. Gay Street, Knoxville. Guests are invited to bring a “Brown Bag” lunch and enjoy the lecture. Soft drinks will be available. For more information on the lecture, exhibitions, or museum hours, call 865-215-8824 or visit the website at www.EastTNHistory.org.


Orchid Award nominations sought

Keep Knoxville Beautiful is now accepting nominations from the public for its beautification awards, the Orchids. Since 1979, Keep Knoxville Beautiful has presented Orchid Awards to Knoxville and Knox County buildings and outdoor spaces that beautify and elevate the local landscape.

Orchid Awards will be granted in the following categories:

New Architecture

Redesign/Reuse

Restaurant/Cafe/Bar/Brewery

Outdoor Space (Parks, Patios, Rooftop Gardens, Neighborhoods, etc.)

Public Art (Murals, Sculptures, Signage, etc.)

Environmental Stewardship (Properties that incorporate renewable materials, energy efficiency, LEED certification and/or other sustainable building practices)

Anyone can nominate a location or outdoor public artwork by completing a simple online form on Keep Knoxville Beautiful’s website, keepknoxvillebeautiful.org, or by calling the office at 865-521- 6957. Private residences are not considered for this award. Properties that received an Orchid Award since 2007 are ineligible except in cases of major renovations. For a list of previous winners, visit the Keep Knoxville Beautiful website.

Nominations are due by Friday, December 16, 2016.

Keep Knoxville Beautiful is honored to have the East Tennessee Community Design Center serve as judges of the dozens of award nominations. Keep Knoxville Beautiful will announce the winners of the beautification awards at the annual Orchids Awards Dinner on Tuesday, March 7, 2017 at 6:00 at The Standard, 416 W. Jackson Avenue.

For more information, contact Keep Knoxville Beautiful at info@keepknoxvillebeautiful.org.

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KKB hosts beautification project

Keep Knoxville Beautiful (KKB) will hold two beautification mobs to plant approximately 18,000 daffodil and tulip bulbs on November 19-20, 2016. Volunteers are needed for both days.

KKB will kick off the weekend on Saturday, November 19 by planting 2,000 daffodil bulbs next to the sidewalks of Sevierville Pike and E. Moody Avenue, near the end of the James White Parkway. Planting will take place from 9:00 AM – 3:00 PM and volunteers will receive a light breakfast and lunch. All tools and supplies will be provided, but volunteers are asked to bring a water bottle and wear clothes and shoes that can get dirty. Parking will be available at the intersection of Sevierville Pike and Compton Street, as well as on surrounding streets.

On Sunday, November 20 from Noon to 5:00 PM, KKB is partnering with the Town of Farragut to plant 16,000 tulip and daffodil bulbs at the Campbell Station Road I-40 Exit. KKB is seeking volunteers over the age of 12 to assist with the beautification mob. All volunteers will receive a lunch and a snack, and are also asked to bring a water bottle and wear clothes and shoes that can get dirty. Parking is available on the public road behind the Marathon Gas Station located at 800 N. Campbell Station Road.

“We’re at it again!” said Bob Graves, KKB board member and owner of sponsoring landscape design firm, Carex Design Group. “Last November, we planted over 60,000 daffodil bulbs on three I-275 exits with the help of over 220 volunteers. In the spring, the blooms carpeted the area with yellow and white, and we’re excited about seeing similar results on Sevierville Pike and the Campbell Station Road exit.”

Volunteers are encouraged to sign up for one or both of the Beautification Mobs at keepknoxvillebeautiful.org.

 


Time for planting dogwood trees

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. – Once again, Dogwood Arts encourages Knoxville to take part in the community-wide dogwood tree-planting day on Saturday, December 3, 2016 . As part of the Bazillion Blooms program, Dogwood Arts asks Knoxville communities to keep their neighborhoods and communities beautiful for years to come by planting not only dogwood trees, but flowering trees and shrubs, bulbs, and perennials during the Fall gardening season. Fall planting allows plants to develop a strong root system over the winter months, so they are strong for upcoming summer heat.

Since the inception of the Bazillion Blooms program in 2009, Dogwood Arts has been working towards a goal of planting 10,000 new trees in the Knoxville community in 10 years. Dogwood Arts is selling disease-resistant dogwood trees at dogwoodarts.com or by phone at (865) 637-4561 through November 18. These 3’ – 4’ bare-root trees are available for $25 each or five for $100.

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Trees ordered from Dogwood Arts must be picked up on Saturday, December 3, from 9 am to 12 pm at the UT Gardens off Neyland Drive. Trees will not be distributed at a later time or date. Photo submitted.

Since the initiation of Bazillion Blooms in 2009, Dogwood Arts, along with community and corporate partners, have planted more than 8,000 April-blooming, disease-resistant dogwood trees.

Bazillion Blooms, a program of Dogwood Arts, is sponsored by the ORNL Federal Credit Union. For more information, visit dogwoodarts.com or call Dogwood Arts at (865) 637-4561.

Dogwood Arts, presented by ORNL Federal Credit Union, is a 501(c)3 organization with a mission to promote and celebrate our region’s art, culture, and natural beauty.


Emporium gallery features new works

The Arts & Culture Alliance is pleased to present five new exhibitions at the Emporium Center in downtown Knoxville from October 7-28, 2016. A public reception will take place on Friday, October 7, from 5:00-9:00 PM to which the public is invited to meet the artists and view the artwork. Most of the works are for sale.

The Tennessee Artists Association: The Fall Juried Show: 42nd Fall Art Exhibition in the downstairs gallery. The Tennessee Artists Association (TAA) will feature original art by over 40 Tennessee artists including oils, watercolors, acrylics, pastels, photography, and mixed media.

In the balcony gallery, the Arrowmont Experience will feature work by its current Artists-in-Residence, Grant Benoit, Richard W. James, Maia Leppo, Austin Riddle, and Emily Schubert, as well as a small selection of works from its permanent collection. This exhibition is presented in conjunction with Tennessee Craft Week, October 7-16, 2016, a collection of craft events and happenings across the state each October.

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Pottery by Rex W. Redd will be shown in the Emporium display case, from October 7-28, 2016. A public reception will take place on Friday, October 7, from 5:00-9:00 PM to which the public is invited to meet the artists and view the artwork. Most of the works are for sale. Redd’s work is an exhibition in clay that pays homage to the history of the medium, but with a contemporary flair to underscore art’s innate tendency to evolve as it passes from maker to maker. Photo courtesy the artist.

As a native Montanan, Rex W. Redd had the blessing of growing up immersed in natural beauty. The central part of the state features vast open grasslands, time worn sandstone structures, and the endless “Big Sky” for which the state is known. Redd attended the University of Montana at Missoula where he graduated with a degree in Anthropology and discovered his true love for the arts. Growing up in Montana usually means ample exposure to Charles Russell, Frederick Remington, and a variety of other cowboy-related art. Craft is dominated by an incredible variety of Native American work, tooled leather, and an array of folk art. While certainly wonderful examples to be surrounded by, college would introduce him to the world of impressionism, abstraction, contemporary craftsmen and the great masters. Redd works in several other mediums including painting, printmaking, photography and wood; often incorporating more than one into a project. He has work in several private and corporate collections throughout the United States, as well as Europe, Japan, and Australia.

Other works on display include Impressions of Nature by Dennis Sabo in the Atrium and Melanie Fetterolf’s Rain Paintings & Classroom Art on the North Wall.

The exhibitions are on display at the Emporium Center, 100 S. Gay Street, in downtown Knoxville. Exhibition hours are Monday-Friday, 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM and Sunday, 3:30-6:30 PM (through October 23). For more information, please contact the Arts & Culture Alliance at (865) 523-7543.


Fall great time to get a new tat

CELEBRATE KNOXVILLE – While you’re thnking about fall decorations, why not add a little color to yourself? This week Celebrate Knoxville paid a visit to Liquid Ink Tattoo to chat with artist Tony Maskevich about industry trends and to ask if Knoxville has its own tat vibe.

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Tony Maskevich (pictured above) says he has worked as a tattoo artist since October of 1991, and since that time he has “heard it all from folks sitting in the chair” and has developed his own strict standards for a clean shop. He has even been a special speaker on industry standards at the University of Tennessee and has expanded his art into creating custom framed artwork (including airbrush) as well as custom design and installation of signage for other businesses. Photo by Laura Long Martin for Celebrate Knoxville.

“Tennessee has some pretty strict standards for this work, but I go even beyond that,” Maskevich says. “You saw my daughter in the lobby, right? I want this shop to be clean enough for me and for my family, as well as for all my clients. Some of the things I do here, (he points with a gloved hand to disposable plastic coverings on the ink lines from his machine and on containers on his desk) aren’t law, but I do them anyway.”

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Cleanliness and hygiene are always important for Liquid Ink Tattoos, and they are inspected six times a year, Maskevich said. Fines for health inspection infringements can range from $50 to $500. The company has strict standards that go beyond what the law requires, and the excellent inspections history for the company is a testimony to high standards.

As far as trends go, Maskevich says geometric patterns from Europe are making their way into the Knoxville market, as well as tattoos designed to look like watercolor paintings. In urban cities like Knoxville, Tennessee, he sees a lot of steampunk, mandalas, and a lot of images that morph into other images like M. C. Escher paintings. As often as he can, he goes to conventions such as Tattoo Carnival of Mayhem in Pasadena, Texas, to learn tricks of the trade from other artists and to keep up with trends.

“Tribal will never go away,” he says, referring to designs that look like black and white drawings. “And I can’t tell you where those designs came from in the beginning, but now it is a standard in this business.”

Editor’s Note: Wiki says the word “tattoo” comes from the Polynesian word “tatau”, meaning “to write.”

Traditional tattoos refer to enduring symbols of a variety of nations and cultures, such as tigers, eagles, stars, swords and other weapons, and fire.

“Traditional tattoos are old school, and are respected designs among equipment makers and ink manufacturers,” Maskevich said. “That would be like the tiger with the sword through his head, or the nautical star, which is considered by some to be a reminder to seek balance in life (star points north, to find your way home).” Other symbolic designs may indicate that a person has spent time in prison (cobweb), survived a suicide attempt (semicolon) or witnessed and/or committed a murder (teardrop).

Maskevich says in 26 years in business he has heard many stories from clients, and since tattoos can be deeply personal, there is a measure of confidentiality to his work. He loves clients that bring in art that they want him to duplicate, but sometimes gets annoyed with people who bring in a photo from Pinterest and want that exact tattoo, which is a challenge sometimes, especially if the design is complicated.

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Maskevich says he works hard to produce the style of work clients are looking for, if not that specific design. Costs for a simple tattoo start at about $60 and can go up into hundreds, even thousands of dollars for large pieces, such as back pieces, or sleeves that cover part or all of an arm. Clients that also want body piercing can choose from a wide variety of jewelry at the shop. Gift certificates are also available.

The business often gets involved with fundraisers, and in October this year Liquid Ink plans to donate a portion of the proceeds to a friend, Bobbi Foster, who is a survivor of breast cancer.

Does Knoxville have its own tat vibe?

“Every state has tattoos that are popular for that place,” he says. “Here in East Tennessee, you better stock up on orange (ink).”

Liquid Ink is located at 12215-B Chapman Highway in Seymour, Tennessee. Call for an appointment at 865-333-5963.


A1LabArts presents fall exhibit

On Friday October 7, 2016, from 5-10 pm A1Labarts will present their 2016 Fall Membership exhibition. Participants are 24 members of A1LabArts which were randomly paired to exchange their works of art over the summer and then create a piece in response to their partner’s work.

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The results will be in this exhibit. In addition to this work, other members will also display their individual art as well.

There will be a closing reception as well held on Friday, October 21 from 6-9pm.

The gallery is located at 23 Emory Place, Knoxville TN 37917

For more information on the exhibit visit www.a1labarts.org.

Based in Knoxville, Tennessee, A1LabArts is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization founded in 1995 by a group of local artists. It is dedicated to multi-disciplinary and experimental exploration of contemporary art issues in all media.

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Historic Parkridge offers Home Tour

The Historic Parkridge Neighborhood will be hosting a Home Tour on Saturday, October 8, 2016 from 1:00-6:00 p.m. Present-day Parkridge encompasses the early Edgewood subdivision which contains many houses designed by George F. Barber, Knoxville’s famous 19th-early 20th century, Victorian house architect. Parkridge has gained notoriety for having the largest concentration of George Barber homes in the nation. This area has been known as part of Park City to residents and former residents for over 100 years. Today the Edgewood-Park City Historic District is on the National Register of Historic Places.

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The homes will span the eras from the 1890’s to the 1920s, and are good examples of the ongoing revitalization of the neighborhood. In addition, a walking tour of about 30 homes not open to the public will be offered. The walking tour will focus on the history of the Barber-designed homes and their former occupants.

Tickets are $10 per person if purchased in advance and $12 on the day of the event. Children under 12 are admitted for free. Parking is available at the Ashley Nicole Park, 620 Winona Street, 37917. Tickets may be purchased in advance at Last Days of Autumn Brewery, Three Rivers Market, or online at www.parkridgecommunity.wordpress.com. Tickets may be purchased until 4:00pm the day of the tour at Ashley Nicole Park. Walking is necessary and many houses have steps. Parkridge is a bike-able neighborhood and tour-goers are welcome to ride bicycles.

More information is available at historicparkridge@gmail.com, or 865-406-4364.


Knox Heritage hosts fall events

Knox Heritage has a lot going on for fall 2016, including a “behind the scenes” look at the restoration of the Farragut Hotel in downtown Knoxville and the Big Bash at Buck Brothers celebrating the restoration of the historic Rexall Building in Lenior City.

Be among the first revelers to celebrate the return of the Buck Brothers Building on October 22, also known as the Waller or Rexall Building. This century-old icon on Broadway in downtown Lenoir City is being restored and we are celebrating its history as a mercantile business, drug store, and dance hall. Enjoy flavors from the past and present with dishes that are Loudon County favorites. Start the evening with a trip back in time at the Lenoir City Museum next door. Then progress into the exciting Buck Brothers project to meet and hear from the developers Diane Powell and Mark Uhran. Dine and dance the night away to a premier band.

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The “Behind the Scenes Tour” of the historic Farragut Hotel is October 21, 2016. This free event for Knox Heritage members will allow guests to see the $22 million transformation of this local icon while it’s underway thanks to Dover Development. The end result in 2017 will be a Hyatt Place Hotel that respects the historic character of the building. Festive beverages and savory snacks will be served.

Not a member of Knox Heritage yet? All memberships include your entire household and free admission to at least two “Behind the Scenes Tours” each year, our Preservation Awards Celebration in November, early access to Summer Suppers tickets, plus discounts at local retailers and restaurants and other perks.

For more information, email to rsvp@knoxheritage.org or call the Knox Heritage office (865) 523-8008.


Bike parking laws changing

The Knoxville-Knox County Metropolitan Planning Commission and the City of Knoxville have been updating the City’s parking ordinance to bring them into line with best practices from across the country. The proposed changes will be reviewed at the MPC meeting September 8, 2016 at 1:00 p.m. in the large assembly room of the City County Building located at 400 W Main St., Suite #403, in downtown Knoxville.

Highlights from the proposed changes:
The number of off-street parking spaces required has generally been reduced, and maximum limits set. (Section D of the draft updated ordinance)
Safe pedestrian travel to and through parking areas is addressed with standards for accessible pedestrian walkways in parking lots. (Section G)
Provisions for bicycle parking have been included in the updated ordinance. (Section I)
Landscaping requirements for parking lots have been enhanced. (Section J)

Please send comments on the proposed changes (whether you approve or disapprove of the changes) to the MPC Commissioners. In particular, they have received no comments on the bike parking requirements, even after having two public meetings.

Comments can be sent to commission@knoxmpc.org or Knoxville-Knox County MPC 400 Main St, Suite 403 Knoxville, TN 37902.


Next Fryer Talk is Aug 30

Knoxville – The East Tennessee Community Design Center (ETCDC) is pleased to announce the next in a series of informal conversations about community design, called Fryer Talks. The event will be August 30, 2016, from 5:00 -7:00 pm, at Dead End BBQ, 3621 Sutherland Avenue, Knoxville.

Fryer Talks are periodic forums, hosted by ETCDC, to engage the community in exploring relevant design issues in our region, and to remember a key founder, Gideon Fryer, who loved exploring ideas.

This talk, sponsored by RMX Technologies, LLC (www.rmxtechnologies.NET), will focus on best practices in zoning, in anticipation of a major update of the City Zoning Ordinance being conducted by the Metropolitan Planning Commission (MPC). MPC executive director, Gerald Green will kick off the discussion and attendees will enjoy a free-flowing discussion. Food and beverages will be available via Dead End BBQ.

Fryer Talks are held at various venues, focus on topics of interest on the day they occur, are informal, and have an air of both academics and frivolity. Over time, the talks are intended to engage East Tennesseans in thoughtful, passionate, free and open-minded conversations about design issues that matter.

Limited space is available so interested citizens are encouraged to RSVP via email to charis@communitydc.org, or call 865-525-9945.


Regas Square project announced

KNOXVILLE, TN – Developer Joe Petre of Conversion Properties, Inc., has announced the launch of Regas Square, a $36 million, six-story luxury midrise offering 101 condominium units and restaurant and retail space. The development will be located at 333 W. Depot Ave., in downtown Knoxville.

“Regas Square is downtown Knoxville’s newest and most remarkable residential and retail development in years,” Petre told elected officials and community leaders at the event. “We’re taking a parking lot and turning it into a development that transforms downtown Knoxville’s skyline, serves as the anchor of our city’s burgeoning Downtown North district and bridges downtown with Emory Place, Broadway at Central and beyond.”

Located in one of the city’s most dynamic areas and encompassing nearly a city block, Regas Square offers close proximity to restaurants, cafes, shops, salons, entertainment venues and galleries of downtown Knoxville and also the University of Tennessee campus. The development features 101 luxury one- to three-bedroom residences with private garage parking; bicycle storage; storage units; state-of- the-art fitness center; clubroom and social areas; private exterior courtyard; and 21,000 square feet of retail and restaurant space with outdoor patio seating.

“We’re thrilled to be in this location,” Petre said. “There’s redevelopment all around us, and this area continues to expand. In five years’ time, Regas Square will be in the center of everything.”

Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero praised the project as another feather in the cap of a flourishing downtown.

“Regas Square not only represents the most significant residential and retail investment Knoxville has seen in years, it also will further enhance our thriving downtown and promote a vibrant local economy,” Rogero said. “We appreciate the substantial investment and careful planning that have gone into making this a first-class project of which we can all be proud.”

The residences offer 20 floorplans featuring generous light-filled living spaces with large terraces, high ceilings, hardwood flooring, ample closet spaces, open kitchens with granite or quartz countertops, custom cabinetry and stainless appliances. Master bathrooms will be stylishly appointed with sleek tile, double vanities, granite or quartz countertops and modern fixtures. Pre-construction pricing begins at $189,900.

Knox County Mayor Tim Burchett said Regas Square will beautify the area and continue to position downtown Knoxville as the perfect place to visit and live.

“I’m happy to see Regas Square go up in this spot,” Burchett said. “A lot of us have fond memories of the old Regas Restaurant, and it’s good to know we will have the opportunity to create some new memories here. This development will boost our local economy and is further proof that downtown is a great place to be.”

More information about residential units is available at http://www.regassquare.com or by contacting Kimberly Dixon Hamilton of Downtown Realty Inc. at 865-405- 8970.

The project was designed by Design Innovation Architects and will be built by TDH Construction. Construction is expected to begin in October 2016, and officials anticipate an 18-month construction period and 2018 opening.

Regas Square - Rendering

Located in one of the city’s most dynamic areas and encompassing nearly a city block, Regas Square offers close proximity to restaurants, cafes, shops, entertainment venues and galleries of downtown Knoxville and the University of Tennessee campus. The development features 101 luxury one- to three-bedroom residences; private garage parking and storage units; a state-of- the art fitness center, club room and social areas; a private exterior courtyard; and 21,000 square feet of retail and restaurant space with outdoor patio seating. For more information, visit http://www.regassquare.com.


Urban Home & Garden tour offered

The East Tennessee Community Design Center (ETCDC) presents the inaugural Urban Home & Garden Tour Friday, Aug. 5, 2016 from 5:30-8 p.m. and Saturday, Aug. 6, from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Starting with the check-in station at the historic Phoenix Building, 418 S. Gay St., the tour will offer access to downtown Knoxville spaces with extraordinary outdoor components. Tickets for the event are $30 each, and all proceeds will benefit the Design Center.

“This self-guided tour of downtown will allow individuals to see creative outdoor features in downtown Knoxville that will inspire participants to truly utilize the outdoor areas around their own homes and see what downtown has to offer as a residential option,” said Wayne Blasius, executive director for the East Tennessee Community Design Center.

Featured properties on the tour include:

Crown Court Condos

Emporium Lofts

Gallery Lofts

Jackson Ateliers

Kendrick Place

Marble Alley Lofts

The Carson

The Holston

“Many people think they have to live outside the city center to have great outdoor options,” said Daryl Johnson, ETCDC board member and Urban Home & Garden Tour committee chair. “The Urban Home & Garden Tour will overturn that assumption, and attendees will enjoy residential buildings that are rich with history and fresh with original design and charm.”

For more information, visit http://www.communitydc.org/


Ice Cream Social for community planners

Knoxville, TN – An Ice Cream Sunday Social and Community Engagement Session will be held Sunday, July 17, 2016 from 1:00-3:30 pm. The East Tennessee Community Design Center (ETCDC) and the Knoxville-Knox County Metropolitan Planning Commission (MPC) will host the event to gather suggestions for the East Knox County Community Plan, being prepared by MPC. It will be at the Carter Senior Center, 9036 Asheville Hwy.

All interested groups, including residents, landowners, community representatives, business owners, and county officials, are encouraged to attend. The information gathered will provide important input for this planning process.

Community members will have the chance to review past plans, consider areas to preserve and for potential future development, identify challenges today, vision for tomorrow, planning priorities, and participate in a Visual Preference Survey. There will be a prize drawing at the end of the session.

East Knox County has wonderful assets such as historic communities, long-standing farms, beautiful vistas, open space, and is flanked by two scenic rivers. Growth is likely, but how future developments impact the environment and benefit the community is yet to be defined. A goal of the East Knox County Community Plan is to ensure that community members are engaged in the process and able to make suggestions, which impact the quality of any future growth. The plan will be a realistic and effective community resource with a set of concise action steps for implementation.

A community representative stakeholder committee has been established to help with the process of gathering input and evaluating recommendations. The group includes representatives from several East Knoxville communities along with key elected and appointed county officials.

Please RSVP via email to leslie@communitydc.org or call (865) 525-9945. Cruze Farm Ice Cream will be served.


Knoxville receives Invest Health grant

A $60,000 grant administered through the East Tennessee Community Design Center has been awarded to the city of Knoxville by Reinvestment Fund and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The new Invest Health initiative is aimed at transforming how leaders from mid-size American cities work together to help low-income communities thrive, with specific attention to community features that drive health such as access to safe and affordable housing, places to play and exercise, and quality

Knoxville and Jackson are the two Tennessee cities among the 50 mid-size cities in 31 states selected to receive the grant. Cities with populations between 50,000 and 400,000 were asked to form five-member teams including representatives from the public sector, community development, and an anchor institution, preferably academic or health-related. The Knoxville team includes: Becky Wade, Knoxville Community Development; Phyllis Nichols, Knoxville Area Urban League; Martha Buchanan, Knox County Health Department; Gerald Green, Metropolitan Planning Commission; and Susan Martin, University of Tennessee-Knoxville. Michelle Eichinger of Designing4Health, LLC, who assisted in developing the team’s proposal, will help in process facilitation.

According to Wayne Blasius, ETCDC executive director, “The team will explore equitable transportation solutions and mixed-use development, including local transportation and planning policy change, and integrate health impact in the planning process in development projects. Further, the team will develop a coordinated, collaborative approach and explore funding strategies to support health equity in the community planning and the built environment.”

Mid-size American cities face some of the nation’s deepest challenges with entrenched poverty, poor health and a lack of investment, Blasius said.

Administrators of the grant believe the program has the potential to fundamentally transform the way Knoxville improves opportunities for healthy lives by addressing the drivers of health including jobs, housing, education, community safety and environmental conditions.


Kid’s night out at the museum

KNOXVILLE—The McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, will host its first “Night at the McClung Museum” family sleepover from 7 p.m. Friday, June 17, 2016 to 8 a.m. Saturday, June 18.

The sleepover will provide children ages 5 to 11 and their parents the opportunity to spend an unforgettable night with dinosaurs and explore the museum’s new special exhibition, “Dinosaur Discoveries: Ancient Fossils, New Ideas,” on loan from the American Museum of Natural History, which reveals a vivid picture of what living, breathing dinosaurs were really like. The event also will feature family-friendly activities including dino-related crafts, a flashlight tour, games, a movie screening and bedtime stories.

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Tickets are $40 a person for museum members and $50 a person for nonmembers and include all activities and craft supplies, a survival pack with an exclusive event-themed bag, flashlight, evening snacks and supplies, and breakfast Saturday morning. Tickets may be purchased online or over the phone at 865-974-2144. Online ticket purchases will incur an additional processing fee. All children must be age 5 to 11 at the time of the sleepover and must be accompanied by an adult chaperone.

Participants can be dropped off and picked up in front of the museum, or parking passes will be available for $10 for those wishing to park their car overnight.

The McClung Museum is at 1327 Circle Park Drive. Museum admission is free, and the museum’s hours are 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Monday to Saturday and 1–5 p.m. Sundays. Groups may schedule tours by calling 865-974-2144 or emailing museum@utk.edu.

Free two-hour museum parking passes are available from the parking information building at the entrance to Circle Park Drive on weekdays by request. Free parking is available on Circle Park Drive on a first-come, first-served basis on weekends. Free public transportation to the museum is also available via the Knoxville Trolley Vol Line.


TN Theatre to upgrade iconic sign

More than a decade after the creation of the new blade sign and marquee, the Tennessee Theatre is launching a fundraising campaign to refurbish the iconic sign and replace the lighting technology with brighter, energy-efficient bulbs.

“The Tennessee Theatre is one of the most photographed landmarks in the state and holds an emotional attachment for East Tennesseans as a symbol of our region,” Tennessee Theatre Executive Director Becky Hancock said. “As part of our commitment to ensuring the theater remains vibrant and protecting the community’s investment of the grand restoration more than 11 years ago, it is time for us to update the technology for the sign and complete necessary maintenance. We are asking the community for support as we undertake this important project.”

Tennessee Theatre will host a free open house Saturday, April 30, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. with backstage tours and Mighty Wurlitzer organ music. Attendees can purchase merchandise, bulbs and letters to support the campaign and learn more about the history of the iconic blade sign and marquee on Gay Street.

To support the marquee campaign, visit www.tennesseetheatre.com/marquee.

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Located in the heart of downtown Knoxville, the Tennessee Theatre opened in 1928 as a movie palace. The Tennessee Theatre is the Official State Theatre of Tennessee and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The Tennessee Theatre is the region’s leading performing arts center with advanced technology, staging and lighting that draws top entertainment to the Knoxville area.


Fourth & Gill tour offered

Knoxville’s Historic Fourth + Gill Neighborhood hosts its 26th Anniversary Tour of Homes on Sunday, April 24, 2016 from 1-6 p.m. The tour begins at the stately Central United Methodist Church, one of the city’s most beautiful examples of Gothic Revival architecture. Visitors may visit one of Knoxville’s premier historical districts and step inside several neighborhood homes, a condominium inside the recently renovated Brownlow School Lofts, and the prominent Greystone mansion.

This year’s tour showcases the art of six local artists whose work will be displayed on porches throughout the neighborhood. The tour coincides with the Dogwood Arts Open Gardens and Walking Trails that feature four neighborhood gardens and several notable trees.

Maps (which include addresses for the gardens) for the self-guided tour are located inside the special event mailbox on the west side of Luttrell Street, adjacent to the Brownlow School Lofts.

Located less than two miles from downtown Knoxville, the Historic Fourth + Gill Neighborhood features over 280 residential structures including single-family homes, duplexes, and apartment and condominium buildings.

The Fourth + Gill Neighborhood Organization is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization whose purpose is to build and to sustain a vital urban community by protecting and preserving the historic architecture of the area and by promoting a strong sense of community.

Tickets may be purchased on the tour day for $12 (free for children 12 and under) at the Central United Methodist Church (201 Third Avenue) from 1:00-5:00pm.

 


McCullough blends art and design

Artist Kate McCullough of Fountain City went back to painting in watercolors 13 years ago after studying art in college and enjoying years in a career in interior design. She says that art and design relate to each other and complement one another, and that probably explains why she enjoyed teaching Feng Shui, the art of arranging a home for the ideal flow of energy.

“The same principles apply in art as they do in interior design,” McCullough told Celebrate Knoxville in a phone interview this morning. “When I returned to school, I immediately fell in love with (how watercolors looked) while taking courses at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. I remember going into the art supplies store and thinking how much I wanted to learn to use watercolors. I can’t really explain what I love about them; I just love how they look.”

Kate McCullough, whose husband Roy is also an artist, says that the couple travel as often as they can and get inspiration on the road.

“We have been around the U.S. and Europe already but we would love to visit Japan and study the art there,” she says. “I am not really a landscape artist but I do enjoy painting urban settings, trains, still life scenes.”

McCullough’s work is among those featured at the upcoming Blount County Public Library’s Knoxville Watercolor Society art exhibit, February 1 through February 29, 2016.

“I joined the Knoxville Watercolor Society in 2009 and found the organization to be very useful to me as an artist,” she says. “They have five or six shows per year that members get to participate in plus I enjoy sharing and learning from other artists in the group. After the show in Blount County, we have shows scheduled in Knoxville at The Emporium and at the Knoxville Museum of Art.”

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Tennessee Gold, watercolor by Fountain City artist Kate McCullough. 

McCullough says the above watercolor painting “Tennessee Gold” was from a photo she took of a shelf in Downtown Wine and Spirits, a business located in downtown Knoxville on Gay Street.

“I asked if I could take some photos in their store, and they said yes,” she says. “The painting of the moonshine jars is a favorite among fans of my work and I think that is because it speaks so much of the history of this area.”

McCullough’s work was featured in last year’s juried exhibition, Artclamation! at the Lighthouse Events Center. She is also a member of the Art Market Gallery, The Tennessee Watercolor Society and Fountain City Art Guild. She teaches painting classes at the Fountain City Art Center on a regular basis.

For more information, visit the artist web site at http://www.katemcculloughwaterart.com/

Regular hours for the Blount County Public Library exhibit of the Knoxville Watercolor Society is Monday through Thursday, 9 am to 9 pm, and Friday through Saturday, 9 am to 5:30 pm. Sunday the library is open from 1 pm to 5:30 pm.

The Blount County Public Library is located at 508 North Cusick Street, in Maryville.