KWG hosts open mic night

Knoxville Writers’ Guild will host its popular Holiday Open Mic and Potluck on Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017, at 7 p.m. at Central United Methodist Church. Members and anyone curious about KWG are encouraged to attend and to bring a covered dish or snack to share. This public event will be in the Fellowship Hall of the church, 201 E. Third Ave. Central United Methodist is a handicapped accessible building and offers plentiful free parking. A $2 donation at the door is suggested.

This is a wonderful event to meet other writers, buy and sell books, and enjoy holiday food with friends.

Guidelines for participants include:

1) You must be a current member of the Knoxville Writers’ Guild to read or sell books, although anyone may come to listen, mix and mingle. You can join or renew your membership before the readings begin. To establish speaker order, there will be a sign-up sheet at the door for those taking part.

2) What you read should be your own work or that of another guild member. If it will be the work of another KWG member, you are required to have permission to read his/her work.

3) Your reading time will be three to four minutes maximum, depending on the number of people who sign up.

4) What you read should be suitable for a general audience.

Members who wish to sell books will be given table space.

 

The Knoxville Writers Guild Membership is $30 and $15 for students. Visit www.knoxvillewritersguild.org.


Knoxtravaganza announces line-up

The Knoxville Performing Arts Exchange (KPAX) announces the lineup for Knoxtravaganza, a local performing arts talent showcase at Modern Studio on Saturday, November 18 starting at 6pm:

Einstein Simplified
Theatre Obsolete
Full Disclosure Comedy
Kelle Jolly
Knoxville Theatre Club
Cattywampus Puppet Council
Juniper Stinnett
Uncensored & Origins (spoken word)

Speed painter Tracey Rowe Crocker will create paintings live as inspired by the performances, which will be available for purchase.

KPAX invites the general public to enjoy FIVE HOURS of the shiniest, the finest and the brightest stars of Knoxville’s performing arts scene. Theatre, dance, puppetry, poetry and much more! Only $5 at the door, +$2 to BYOB (21+). The $2 corking fee is waived with the purchase of advanced tickets.

KPAX supports local performing artists by providing the basic infrastructure and utilities (e.g. stage, lighting, and sound) in a stable, supportive environment combined with audience convenience and comfort. These provisions allow performing arts groups of all types and experience levels to focus more of their resources and efforts on artistic quality, enabling them to expand their audiences, and by extension, their programming. KPAX is overseen by Carolyn Corley as part of Modern Studio, a flexible entertainment venue providing the basic infrastructure and resources for performing arts groups to engage, excite and inspire Knoxville audiences.

Modern Studio is a flexible, mixed use maker & performing arts space located in Happy Holler (north Knoxville) that provides support & space to local entrepreneurs & artists.


Attorney to speak to writing group

Mark P. Crockett, an attorney with the intellectual property firm of Luedecka Neely, will speak on Thursday, October 5, 2017 on the topic “What Writers Must Know About Libel, Slander, and Copyright.” This informal but expert presentation will be at 7 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall of Central United Methodist Church, 201 East Third Street. Admission is a suggested donation of $2.

Plentiful, free parking is available in lots to the back and side of the church, which is wheelchair accessible. Along with cookies and coffee, you’ll find KWG hospitality and community support.

Crockett will cover such questions as: If you write memoirs, how can libel laws affect you? When and how can you safely incorporate another person’s work in your own? How do you protect your own work? If you are reading your work aloud, what laws apply?

Crockett is a cum laude graduate of the University of Tennessee College of Law. Please note that while he will give an overview of writers’ legal rights and responsibilities, he will not address individual cases or give legal advice. He will tell audience members how to protect themselves and when to get professional help. Participants will learn how to save themselves a lot of trouble and protect their creative work. This program is essential for anybody serious about writing!

The Knoxville Writers Guild welcomes your participation. Membership is $30 and $15 for students. Visit www.knoxvillewritersguild.org.


Free Volunteer Expo is Oct. 7

Volunteer East Tennessee’s annual Volunteer Expo returns to West Town Mall on Saturday, October 7, 2017, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. The Volunteer Expo is a free event with more than 40 participating nonprofits in one location. The expo was created by Volunteer East Tennessee to help community members connect with nonprofits and learn about service opportunities that match their skills and interests.

Volunteer Expo attendees can meet with and learn about a variety of nonprofits that make a difference in the community. Participating organizations represent the arts, humanities, the environment, animal welfare, health, human services and more. If you have ever wanted to make a difference but did not know how to get involved, the Volunteer Expo is a great place to start — whether you are looking for a one-time volunteer opportunity or a long-term commitment.

“We see the Volunteer Expo as a way to highlight the nonprofits that help make Knoxville a thriving community, many of which rely on the generous support from volunteers,” said Alyson Gallaher Executive Director of Volunteer East Tennessee. “Volunteer East Tennessee has a commitment to help grow the collective of our partner nonprofit organizations, which positively impacts our community. We are proud to organize and host this event for the greater Knoxville area at West Town Mall.”

There is no cost for community members to attend the event. The first 300 attendees to create volunteer accounts on-site or show proof of an existing volunteer account with www.volunteeretn.org, receive a Volunteer East Tennessee PopSocket. There will be a DIY service project happening on-site during the Expo. The project, assembling hygiene kits, will be sent via the Red Cross to recent hurricane disaster areas. Community members participating in the Volunteer Expo will also be eligible for a raffle with an assortment of prizes.

For more information on the Volunteer Expo, please visit VolunteerETN.org/VolunteerExpo or contact Melanie Vincent, Regional Director at 865.582.4085.

Volunteer East Tennessee’s mission is to inspire service by equipping organizations and mobilizing volunteers to connect with one another and strengthen communities. Volunteer East Tennessee is a nonprofit organization that offers a unique technology that will assist local nonprofit organizations with fulfilling their needs with quality volunteers, volunteer training, and a broader reach into the community and region.


Novelists to read at UT

KNOXVILLE, TN – Novelists Michael Shou-Yung Shum and Jesse Goolsby will read at the University of Tennessee on Monday, October 2, 2017. . The event is part of UT’s Writers in the Library reading series. The reading begins at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of the John C. Hodges Library. The event is free and open to the public; all are encouraged to attend. A brown bag Q&A, open to University of Tennessee students, will be held at noon in 1210 McClung Tower.

Born and raised in Houston, Texas, Michael Shou-Yung Shum eventually found himself dealing poker in a dead-end casino in Lake Stevens, Washington. Two doctorates bookend this turn of events: the first in Psychology from Northwestern, and the second in English from University of Tennessee. Along the way, Michael spent a dozen years in Chicago, touring the country as a rave DJ. He currently resides in Astoria, Queens, with Jaclyn Watterson and three cats. Queen of Spades (Forest Avenue Press) is his first novel.

Jesse Goolsby is the author of the novel I’d Walk with My Friends If I Could Find Them (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt). His fiction and essays have appeared in places like EPOCH, The Kenyon Review, Narrative Magazine and Salon. He is the recipient of the Richard Bausch Short Story Prize and the John Gardner Memorial Award in Fiction, among other honors. A US Air Force officer, Goolsby holds a Masters in English from the University of Tennessee and a PhD in Creative Writing from Florida State University.

The reading begins at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of the John C. Hodges Library. The event is free and open to the public; all are encouraged to attend. A brown bag Q&A, open to University of Tennessee students, will be held at noon in 1210 McClung Tower.

The mission of Writers in the Library is to “showcase the work of novelists, poets, and other literary craftsmen.” Some of the best voices in contemporary literature are invited to read. The series is sponsored by the UT Libraries and the Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund.

For more information, contact Erin Elizabeth Smith, Jack E. Reese Writer-in-Residence at the UT Libraries, at esmith83@utk.edu or visit http://library.utk.edu/writers for a complete schedule of Writers in the Library readings for the 2017-2018 academic year.


Theatre reinvents ‘Cinderella’ tale

KNOXVILLE, TN – Cindy & Ella, the Knoxville Theatre Club’s inaugural production, is based on the ancient folktale of Cinderella, but if you’re only familiar with the Disney cartoon, the plot of this dark comedy may be a bit surprising.​ ​

Stranded in the lifeless heart of Dust Bowl-era Oklahoma, and reeling from the traumatic death of her mother, young Cindy Wicket is left teetering on the brink of madness. When a handsome young man from Chicago arrives offering to buy the land, the stage is set for a final conflict over control of the homestead and the fate of all who live there. Photo: Knoxville Theatre Club.

When her scheming Aunt Eudora arrives claiming ownership of the home, a violent battle of wits and wills ensues.

Meanwhile, Eudora’s daughter Ella must wrestle with her own mounting desperation as she watches her hopes for the future vanish beneath dust, dead crops, and her mother’s all-consuming greed.

Co-author Sara Gaddis says about the production, “The Cinderella story is more than 3000 years old and there are versions of it in almost every culture, from Germany to Vietnam. We wanted to tell a story that was fun, exciting, and recognizable to everyone, but still left room to for us to explore the most enduring themes and relationships of those fairytales from a modern perspective, especially the messages the stories send to young women about their intimate and interpersonal struggles, the necessity and danger of hope, and the gifts or burdens our mothers leave us.”

Cindy & Ella stars Theatre Knoxville Downtown President Bonny Pendleton, Raine Palmer (The Office, Two Gentlemen of Verona, A Midsummer Night’s Dream), Chad Wood (Two Gentlemen of Verona, Tennessee Medieval Faire, Hamlet) and Maria Kauffman (Pride and Prejudice, Sleeping Beauty, The Crucible.) The show’s co-creators Gaddis and JP Schuffman have been producing original work together in NYC, Nashville, and Knoxville since 2010. In 2017 they founded Knoxville Theatre Club, which has hosted workshops and local community events such as The Pop-Up Theatre Project, Drama & Drinks, The Crow Flies Scriptworks, and the Knoxville Theatre Slam.

Cindy & Ella runs September 22-23 & 29-30, 2017 at Modern Studio, 109 W Anderson Ave, in Knoxville. Ticket prices vary ($5 to $25) and are available for purchase online at the theatre website. Seating is limited and reservations are strongly recommended.

Visit ​knoxvilletheatreclub.org.


Blues Cruise is July 23

Ready to cool off with some great food and drink plus entertainment on the water? Smoky Mountain Blues Society will host a Blues Cruise with the Tennessee Riverboat Company in downtown Knoxville on July 23, 2017 from 4:00 pm to 7:00 pm.

This Smoky Mountain Blues Society Blues Cruise will feature entertainment by The Stella Vees of Lexington, Kentucky. Photo submitted.

The Stella Vees are a traditional electric blues band that plays in a similar style to Albert Collins, T Bone Walker, Little Walter and Buddy Guy. With over 18 years of playing and touring together, the band performs a smoking style of blues with an authenticity, intimacy and steadfast dynamic that’s not often found in modern music. They bring to mind the vintage blues once so predominant in Chicago juke joints back in the day, while making it sound fresh and vital for a contemporary crowd.

Tickets are just $16 in advance and $20 at the door. Smoky Mountain Blues Society Members enjoy a special discount. Each voyage will also have a limited food menu and full bar available.

Boarding begins at 3pm. for this event and tickets are available through the Tennessee Riverboat Company’s website, (http://tnriverboat.com/blues-cruises-2/) and by calling (865) 525-7827.


Writers guild offers open mic

If you were thinking about joining a writer’s group to promote your work, now would be an excellent time to join the Knoxville Writers’ Guild. Members of the Knoxville Writers’ Guild will have an opportunity to read their work at the Guild’s annual Open Mic Night on Thursday, July 6, 2017.

The event, which will be open to the public, will begin at 7 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall of Central United Methodist Church, 201 3rd Avenue. A $2 donation is requested at the door. Parking is plentiful and free.

“The annual Knoxville Writers’ Guild’s Open Mic program is one of our most popular of the year. It is a great way to hear the work of other writers and have a good time,” said President Donna Kapa.

To ensure as many people as possible have the chance to read, the Guild follows these guidelines:

1) You must be a current member of the Knoxville Writers’ Guild to read your work. You may join or renew your membership at the event ($30, with discount to $15 for students). There will be a sign-up sheet at the door for readers. Writers sign up on a first come, first serve basis.

2) You may only read your own work or that of another KWG member with their written permission.

3) Podium time is two to three minutes maximum, depending on the number of people who sign up. Three minutes is about one and a half double-spaced pages. A reader’s time includes any explanation, set-up or backstory. There are no exceptions. Readers should time their segment in advance.

4) The content of what you read should be suitable for a general audience.

Attendees are also invited to bring a book to swap with fellow writers. If your book is not picked up, you are welcome to leave it behind to become a raffle item at a future Guild meeting. Book swap starts at 6:30 before the Open Mic.

Visit www.knoxvillewritersguild.org.


Bike To Work Day is May 19

May is National Bike Month and there are all kinds of rides and events happening in Knoxville, Tennessee to celebrate. Here are a few opportunities to get you connected:

Bike to Work Day
Fri, May 19
7:30 – 8:30 a.m.
Stop by Market Square as you ride your bike to work and grab coffee donated by Trio and a treat.

Meet at one of these locations to join a guided ride:

6:45 a.m., Halls. Meet at Ace Hardware in Halls Center. 6950 Maynardville Pike.
7:15 a.m., North Knoxville. Meet at Office Depot/Food City parking lot on Broadway, 4212 N Broadway.
7:15 a.m., East Knoxville. Meet at Holston River Park, 3300 Holston Hills Road (top parking lot by pavilion).
7:15 a.m., Bearden. Meet at Third Creek Greenway trailhead, 130 Forest Park Blvd.
7:30 a.m., South Knoxville. Meet at 3701 Sevierville Pike (southeast corner of Sevierville Pk and Lancaster).

Here are other options for a reward for biking to work on Friday, May 19, 2017:

Makers Donuts – free donut
Old City Java – free cup of coffee
Wild Love Bakehouse – free cup of coffee
Three Rivers Market – free drink (under $2)

I Bike KNX Bike Month Discounts
Have you taken the I BIKE KNX safe bicycling pledge? If so, you should have received your free I Bike KNX helmet sticker. Many local businesses show their support for bicycling by offering discounts or freebies when you bike there and show your I Bike KNX helmet sticker to the cashier during May.

Spring bike class sessions
The free 30-min classes are customized just for you! We can help you learn how to: start biking again, ride safely in traffic, ride a bike, ride without training wheels, or use your gears to make riding easier and more fun. Classes will be held at the new Suttree Landing Park, 701 Langford Ave (near Island Home).

Sign up here for sessions on April 29 and May 6. After the free session, if you or your child need more instruction, we offer classes at your convenience: $10 for 30-min or $15 for 1 hour (shorter classes are best for younger kids). Just email to request a class.

Visit http://www.ibikeknx.com/bikemonth.


Editors speak at Writers’ Guild

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. – Editors of three prestigious literary journals, Alexis Williams of New Millennium Writings, Richard Hermes of Grist, and Marianne Worthington of Still will explain what they’re looking for and how they work at the May program of the Knoxville Writers’ Guild. The program will take place Thursday, May 4, 2017 at 7:00 pm.

The public is invited to the program, which will be held in the Fellowship Hall of Central United Methodist Church, 201 East Third Avenue. Admission is a suggested $2 and parking is free.

Alexis Williams has been a part of New Millennium Writings (NMW) since its founding in 1996. An honors graduate of Middle Tennessee State University with a B.A. in English Literature, she spent several years working in higher education and in corporate communications and publishing, before taking over as Editor of NMW in 2012. She has to date published hundreds of writers within the pages of NMW and looks forward to many more years of rewarding and publishing members of the writing community.

Richard Hermes is a Ph.D. candidate in the creative writing program at the University of Tennessee. His awards include Minnesota Monthly’s Tamarack Award, a Minnesota State Arts Board grant, and a Luce Scholars fellowship to Thailand, where he worked as a writer and editor for eight years. His favorite invisible city is currently Euphemia.

Marianne Worthington grew up in Knoxville, Tennessee and moved to southeastern Kentucky in 1990 where she works as a teacher, editor & writer. In 2009 she co-founded Still: The Journal, an online literary journal with Silas House & Jason Howard. She has a poetry chapbook, Larger Bodies Than Mine, from Finishing Line Press, and she edited the first three volumes of the Motif anthology series from MotesBooks. She am also poetry editor (and the former book reviews editor) for Now & Then: The Appalachian Magazine.

The Knoxville Writers’ Guild exists to facilitate a broad and inclusive community for area writers, provide a forum for information, support and sharing among writers, help members improve and market their writing skills and promote writing and creativity. Additional information can be found at www.KnoxvilleWritersGuild.org.


Poets read for library series

KNOXVILLE, TN – On Monday, March 27, 2017 poets Maria James-Thiaw and Bobby C. Rogers will present readings at the University of Tennessee. The event is part of UT’s Writers in the Library reading series. The mission of Writers in the Library is to showcase the work of novelists, poets, and other literary craftsmen. Some of the best voices on the literary scene today are invited to read.

The reading begins at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of the John C. Hodges Library. The event is free and open to the public; all are encouraged to attend.

Maria James-Thiaw began bringing poems to life on stages during the spoken word revolution of the mid-nineties. Her works have been published in several journals including Cutthroat Journal of the Arts, Black Magnolias, Love Your Rebellion, the Spirit Speaks anthology, and others. She serves on the board of Philadelphia Stories and the Writer’s Wordshop. She is the author of three poetry collections including “Talking ‘White,’” which deals with issues of class and culture while celebrating our literary history. She is a professor of writing in the Department of English and Communication at Central Penn College in Pennsylvania.

Bobby C. Rogers is Professor of English and Writer-in-Residence at Union University. His first book, “Paper Anniversary,” won the Agnes Lynch Starrett Poetry Prize. In 2015, he was named a Witter Bynner Fellow at the Library of Congress by Poet Laureate Charles Wright. His new book, “Social History,” has just been released by LSU Press in their Southern Messenger Poets series.

Writers in the Library is sponsored by the UT Libraries and the Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund.

For more information, contact Erin Elizabeth Smith, Jack E. Reese Writer-in-Residence at the UT Libraries, atesmith83@utk.edu or visit http://library.utk.edu/writers for a complete schedule of Writers in the Library readings for the 2016-2017 academic year.


RB Morris at KWG meeting

Prominent  poet, songwriter and musician RB Morris, Knoxville’s first Poet Laureate, will speak at the March 2, 2017 meeting of the Knoxville Writers’ Guild.

“I’ll be talking about poetry and songwriting, and some of the current projects I’m involved in as Poet Laureate, perhaps sing a song or two and read a few poems,” Morris said. He’ll also field questions about his creative process as writer in multiple art forms.

The public is invited to the program, which will be at 7 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall of Central United Methodist Church, 201 East Third Avenue, where you will find a large, free parking lot. Admission is a suggested $2.

Morris has been a driving artistic force in Knoxville, reflecting the city in his poetry and music. He wrote and acted in “The Man Who Lives Here is Looney,” a one-man play taken from the life and work of James Agee. He was instrumental in the founding of a park in Fort Sanders dedicated to Agee.

Morris’s published books of poetry include “Early Fires” (Iris Press), “Keeping the Bees Employed” and “The Mockingbird Poems” (Rich Mountain Bound). His music albums include “Spies Lies and Burning Eyes” and his most recent solo project, “Rich Mountain Bound.”

R B Morris served as the Jack E. Reese Writer-in-Residence at the University of Tennessee 2004-2008. He was inducted into the East Tennessee Writers Hall of Fame in 2009.


New voices at Knoxville Writers Guild

The Knoxville Writer’s Guild’s Thursday, February 2, 2017 program, “Bold New Voices,” features three electrifying, socially and politically engaged young poets and performing artists at the Fellowship Hall of Central United Methodist Church, 201 S. Third Avenue, Knoxville, starting at 7 p.m.

Rhea Carmon is a mathematician, poet, singer, youth mentor and creator of the powerful Fifth Woman group, inspiring women to “step on stage and bare their souls in front of an audience.” Her monthly reggae-inspired poetry slams excite and nurture scores of young poets. Photo courtesy Knoxville Writers Guild.

Jeb Herrin brings his dramatic experience as a medic in Iraq to his work in the MFA program at the University of Tennessee. His work takes us deep into the soldier’s journey from training to deployment, and then back to civilian world, where another battle for survival begins.

Ben McClendon’s work is widely published, exploring ecology, politics, and the power of queer love in an age of profound environmental risk. Poetry, he says, “is well situated to explore, celebrate, and inquire into all things ecological because its tradition has always been to explore the human, and through us the world.”

Knoxville Writers Guild meetings are open to the public. A $2 donation is requested at the door.


WDVX show takes winter break

The WDVX Blue Plate Special, a popular downtown Knoxville attraction for nearly 12 years, is going on hiatus while the Knoxville Visitor Center undergoes a facelift. Kicking off its “20 Years on the Air” celebration, WDVX will be taking the live radio broadcast out to various locations in the area with show host Red Hickey and performances by local and touring artists.

The first show is scheduled for Friday, January 13, 2017 at the Open Chord, ​8502 Kingston Pike, Knoxville, TN, featuring The Lonetones and the South Carolina Broadcasters. Other venues slated to be visited by the Blue Plate Special production are the Clayton Center on the Maryville College campus, Pellissippi State Community College, and the Grove Theatre in Oak Ridge. Details about upcoming shows and performers will be available on WDVX.com. As with the daily Blue Plate Special, whose last show of the year is Saturday, December 31, every road show will be free to attend. The WDVX Blue Plate Special Road Shows will continue through February. The Visitor Center is expected to celebrate with a grand reopening on Friday, March 2, 2017.

WDVX, a non-commercial listener supported radio station, plays a mix of American roots music including Bluegrass, blues, Alt-County, classic Country, old-time, Swing, Rockabilly, and more. Yet the Blue Plate Special regularly steps beyond that framework by presenting classical, jazz, theatrical, and international artists; sometimes on the same show as singer/songwriters, bluegrass, and country performers. More than 20,000 people attend the Blue Plate Special each year to see more than 1600 artists perform.

WDVX is a service of non-profit organization Cumberland Communities Communications Corporation. Its broadcast on 89.9 FM reaches eleven counties in East Tennessee and Southeast Kentucky, on 102.9 in downtown Knoxville, and 93.9 in the Seymour and Kodak areas, and streams lives on WDVX.com.


Knoxville Writers meet January 5

New York Times bestselling author Bob Mayer will talk about changes in the publishing industry at the 7 p.m., Jan. 5, 2016 meeting of the Knoxville Writers’ Guild. The public is invited to the program, which will be at the Fellowship Hall of Knoxville’s Central United Methodist Church, 201 East Third Avenue. Enter at the back, where parking is free and plentiful. Admission is a suggested $2. The building is handicapped accessible.

Mayer, author of more than 70 books including the #1 bestselling series Area 51, Atlantis, and the Green Berets, will help authors navigate through the latest information on various forms of publishing options.

“Publishing is changing exponentially, and today’s writer must be aware of these changes in order to succeed. This workshop is designed to help authors navigate through the latest information on various forms of publishing options,” he said.

He will talk about traditional, ePublishing, Print on Demand, self-publishing, vanity, and more. “We will cover the advantages and disadvantages all these venues to help you, the writer, decide what’s the best choice for you and your work,” he said.

Mayer is a graduate of West Point and a former Green Beret (including commanding an A-Team). Born in the Bronx and having traveled the world (usually not the tourist spots), he now lives peacefully with his wife and two Labs. His web site is www.bobmayer.com.


Knoxville writers host potluck supper

Members of the Knoxville Writers’ Guild will share their works and hold a mix and mingle potluck for December’s monthly program. Both current members and the public are encouraged to attend and to bring a covered dish or holiday snack.

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The event will begin at 7 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 1, 2016 at Central United Methodist Church’s Fellowship Hall, 201 E. Third Ave. Attendees should enter off of the large parking lot behind the church. A $2 donation is welcome at the door with free and accessible parking available.

We will also have sales tables provided for KWG members to sell their work.

For those interested in reading, there are a few simple guidelines:

1) You must be a current member of the Knoxville Writers’ Guild. You can join or renew your membership before the readings begin. There will be a sign-up sheet at the door for those taking part to establish speaker order.

2) What you read should be your own work or that of another group member. If it will be the work of another KWG member, you are required to have permission to read his/her work.

3) Your reading time will be three minutes maximum. It’s not necessary that your reading last the full amount of time allotted. For instance, if you have a one-minute poem and don’t have anything else you’d like to read, that would be fine.

4) What you read should be suitable for a general audience. In other words, please show courtesy to those attending. Think of approaching your reading as something to be shared and appreciated by one-and-all.

The Knoxville Writers Guild membership is $30 and $15 for students. Visit www.knoxvillewritersguild.org.


Carpetbag Theatre receives grant

The Carpetbag Theatre, Inc. is proud to announce the receipt of a major multi-year grant awarded from The Roy Cockrum Foundation in support of the organization’s 50th Anniversary Celebration Series.

The Carpetbag Theatre, Inc. will be utilizing the funds received to remount six of the most beloved plays from the theatre’s past, as well as supporting the future creation and development of Carpetbag’s newest original work currently entitled, “Bricks.”

With generous support from The Roy Cockrum Foundation, Carpetbag will be remounting these original works as fully produced performances at fully equipped Knoxville and Maryville, Tennessee venues. The performances will take place over the course of the three years leading up to the Anniversary celebration (2017, 2018, 2019) with two productions per year. CBT will invite former ensemble members who have remained in the professional field to return as guest artists and directors of the project.

The scheduled plays to be presented are as follows: Between A Ballad and A Blues, Nothin’ Nice, Dark Cowgirls and Prairie Queens, Ce Nitram Sacul, SWOPERA (a Spoken Word Opera), and Red Summer. The development of Carpetbag’s newest work, “Bricks” will trace the history of the African American brick making industry and its significance to the region.

The Carpetbag Theatre is a Professional African American Legacy Theater company with a rich history of service to diverse populations. As an intergenerational ensemble company, the company’s efforts are to engage communities of color and other disenfranchised communities. An ensemble company both artistically and administratively, CBT works collaboratively to fulfill this mission, to build communities and to develop social capital, emphasizing inclusion and cross-cultural dialogue.

The mission of The Roy Cockrum Foundation is to award grants to support world-class performing arts projects in not-for-profit professional theaters throughout the United States.


Hickman named to KCDC board

Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero has appointed Kimberly Hickman, a participant in the Section 8 homeownership program, to a two-year term as resident commissioner of Knoxville’s Community Development Corporation (KCDC). The KCDC Board of Commissioners consists of seven members and includes a resident commissioner who is a current participant in one of KCDC’s affordable housing programs.

“Kimberly is the first resident commissioner from our Section 8 program,” KCDC Executive Director Art Cate said. “She will bring a unique perspective on the direct community impact of the approximately 4,000 Section 8 rental and homeownership vouchers that we manage and administer. Kimberly has a passion for helping others, and I know that her experience in the Section 8 program and as a homeowner will be a tremendous asset to the board.”

hickman-sm

Kimberly Hickman has been a resident of Knoxville since 2002 when she moved from Illinois with her family. Hickman was accepted to the Housing Choice Voucher Program and soon transitioned into the Section 8 Homeownership program. After participating in the required classes, she purchased her own home using the Section 8 voucher to pay a portion of her mortgage.

“I have been in the house with my children for almost two years. It took me five years total to save the money and complete the coursework while establishing credit,” said Hickman. “I have lived this process and that has given me a lot of insight that I hope to bring to this position.”

Hickman now resides in the East Knoxville community. She is a certified nursing assistant and the mother of two children, ages 15 and 16.

Hickman began her term on the KCDC Board of Commissioners on Aug. 1.

KCDC’s board oversees programs provided by the agency, including affordable public housing administration, redevelopment and rental assistance programs. Other board members are: Chair Daniel P. Murphy, professor of accounting at the University of Tennessee; Vice Chair Jacqueline Arthur, general manager of the Three Rivers Market; John Winemiller, law partner at Merchant & Gould; Bruce Anderson, general counsel at East Tennessee Children’s Hospital; Gloria Garner, retired vice president of internal/external affairs for the Knoxville Area Urban League; and Bob Whetsel, retired City of Knoxville director of redevelopment.

Since 1936, KCDC has been dedicated to enhancing the quality of life for the citizens of Knoxville. KCDC’s mission is to improve and transform neighborhoods and communities by providing quality affordable housing, advancing development initiatives and fostering self-sufficiency. For more information, visit http://www.kcdc.org.


Mural unveiled at Chilhowee Park

A new mural was unveiled at Chilhowee Park & Exposition Center in Knoxville, Tennessee on Friday, Sept. 9, 2016. This community-led project was funded by a grant from the Tennessee Arts Commission, the East Tennessee Foundation and the First Tennessee Foundation.

“Chilhowee Park & Exposition Center plays a vital role in this community as a gathering place for recreation and fellowship,” said Knoxville City Councilman Daniel Brown. “I have many great memories of this park, which has served as the heart of this neighborhood since the early 1900s. This mural will provide great enjoyment to the local residents and guests that come to this facility.”

A neighborhood group developed the idea for a mural representing East Knoxville to be painted on a retaining wall at Chilhowee Park & Exposition Center. A committee of neighborhood association members selected University of Tennessee graduate and Nashville-based artist Brandon Donahue to develop a mural design that incorporated the history of East Knoxville and Chilhowee Park.

The mural was completed in late August this year.

Chilhowee Park and Exposition Center is an 81-acre, multiuse venue owned by the City of Knoxville. It is located blocks away from interstate access and minutes from downtown Knoxville. The facility includes a three-acre lake, bandstand, 4,500-seat amphitheater, 57,100-square-foot exhibition hall, barns, arenas, playground and picnic shelters. Chilhowee also is home to the Tennessee Valley Fair.

mural-ceremony
Elected officials and representatives of the City of Knoxville Public Arts Committee, Arts and Culture Alliance, East Tennessee Foundation and First Tennessee Foundation joined muralist Brandon Donahue to cut the ribbon on a new mural in Chilhowee Park & Exposition Center on Sept. 9, 2016. From left: Public Arts Committee member Susana Esrequis; Bob Booker; Judge John Rosson; Public Arts Committee member Tanisha Fitzgerald-Baker; Knox County Commissioner John Schoonmaker; City Councilman Finbarr Saunders; artist Brandon Donahue; Knox County Commissioner Evelyn Gill; Ed Shouse; City Councilman Daniel Brown; First Tennessee Bank Foundation’s Joshalyn Hundley; East Tennessee Foundation’s Jan Elston; and Arts and Culture Alliance’s Liza Zenni. Photo submitted.


SAFTA hosts readings at Bar Marley

The Sundress Reading Series is excited to welcome Charles Dodd White, Sybil Baker, and Randon Billings Noble for readings on Sunday, September 18, 2016 from 2 to 4 PM at Bar Marley (760 Stone St NW) in North Knoxville.

Charles Dodd White lives in East Tennessee. He is a recipient of the Chaffin Award for excellence in Appalachian Literature, a Jean Ritchie Fellowship from Lincoln Memorial University, and an individual artist’s grant from the North Carolina Arts Council. He is author of the novels, A Shelter of Others (2014), Lambs of Men (2010), and the story collection, Sinners of Sanction County (2011). He is also editor of the contemporary Appalachian story anthologies, Degrees of Elevation (2010) and Appalachia Now (2015). His work has appeared in Red Holler: Contemporary Appalachian Writing, Walk Till the Dogs Get Mean: Meditations on the Forbidden from Contemporary Appalachia, Appalachian Heritage, The Louisville Review, North Carolina Literary Review, The Rumpus, Tusculum Review and others. He is an Assistant Professor at Pellissippi State Community College in Knoxville, Tennessee where he chairs the James Agee Conference.

Sybil Baker’s most recent novel is Into This World. She is a UC Foundation Assistant Professor at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, and teaches at the Yale Writer’s Conference. Immigration Essays, partially funded by a Make Work Artist Grant, is forthcoming in from C&R Press. She is a 2017 recipient of an Individual Artist Grant by the Tennessee Arts Commission. She is Fiction Editor at Drunken Boat.

Randon Billings Noble is an essayist. Her work has appeared in the Modern Love column of The New York Times, The Georgia Review, The Rumpus, Brevity, Creative Nonfiction, Fourth Genre and elsewhere. A fellow at the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts and a resident at the Vermont Studio Center, she was named a 2013 Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation Creative Fellow to attend a residency at The Millay Colony for the Arts. Currently she is a nonfiction editor at r.kv.r.y quarterly, Reviews Editor at Tinderbox Poetry Journal, and a reviewer for The A.V. Club.

The Sundress Reading Series is free and open to the public.


East TN Plant Swap scheduled

The Fall 2016 East Tennessee Plant Swap will be held at New Harvest Park, located at 4775 New Harvest Lane, Knoxville, Tennessee, on Saturday, October 8, 2016. The swap starts at 10:00am. (No exchanges before that, please.) The potluck lunch will be at 11:30am.

Everyone is invited to attend the Fall meeting of the East Tennessee Plant Swap. The ETPS is a group of men and women who love plants and enjoy sharing them with friends.

There is no fee for attendance and no money can exchange hands for the plants. This is a great way to add lovely plants to lawns and gardens at absolutely no cost.

Editor’s Note: If you do not have plants to share, you are encouraged to attend anyway. You can bring gardening magazines, small tools, potholders, wind chimes, or any small items gardeners might enjoy. Over the years those new to the meeting have brought canned foods such as homemade pickles or beets, garden signs, books and homemade bags.


Library sponsors author readings

Novelist Leah Stewart will read from her work at the University of Tennessee on Monday, September 19, 2016. The event is part of the university’s Writers in the Library reading series. The public is invited to this free reading at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of UT’s John C. Hodges Library.

Stewart is the author of five novels, most recently The New Neighbor, a darkly sophisticated novel about an old woman’s curiosity turned into a dangerous obsession as she becomes involved in her new neighbor’s complicated and cloaked life. The New York Times Book Review says of The New Neighbor, “Stewart never relaxes her tight focus on these complex characters.” People Magazine calls it “a chilling page-turner.”

Stewart is professor and area director of creative writing in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of Cincinnati. She has held visiting writer positions at the University of the South in Sewanee, Tennessee; Vanderbilt University; and Murray State University in Kentucky. In 2010, she was the recipient of an NEA Literature Fellowship and in 2014 the recipient of a Sachs Fund Prize.

Visit http://library.utk.edu/writers for a complete schedule of Writers in the Library readings for the 2016-2017 academic year.

Writers in the Library is sponsored by the UT Libraries and the Creative Writing Program in association with the John C. Hodges Better English Fund. For more information, contact Erin Elizabeth Smith, Jack E. Reese Writer-in-Residence at the UT Libraries, at esmith83@utk.edu.


Parsons is Writers Guild speaker

Noted poet Linda Parsons will speak at the Thursday, Sept. 1, 2016 meeting of the Knoxville Writers’ Guild. She will present her new and fourth poetry collection, “This Shaky Earth” (Texas Review Press, 2016), and discuss the process of preparing a collection.

The meeting is open to the public and will begin at 7 p.m. in Central United Methodist Church’s Fellowship Hall at 201 E. Third Ave. The event is at the same time as the first UT football game of the season, but you can click here to find a route that bypasses the traffic. Attendees should enter off the large parking lot behind the church. A $2 donation is welcome at the door with free and accessible parking available.

“‘This Shaky Earth’ straddles time, family divisions and legacies. It’s leavened with a hunger to understand the growing pains of childhood and to know that all will be well as we navigate this sometimes ‘shaky earth,’” Parsons said. “I’m excited to discuss the process and challenges of compiling and organizing a collection for publication.”

Parsons is a member of the East Tennessee Writers Hall of Fame. Her poems have appeared in journals such as The Georgia Review, Iowa Review, Prairie Schooner, Southern Poetry Review, Asheville Poetry Review, and Shenandoah and in numerous anthologies. Her play adaptation, “Macbeth Is the New Black,” co-written by Jayne Morgan, completed runs at Maryville College and Western Carolina University. In October, she will present the Henrietta Jenkins Memorial Homecoming reading at Carson Newman University.


Gallery welcomes David Barnett

On Monday, August 29, 2016, Knoxville’s Schwarzbart Gallery will welcome David Barnett, a painter, illustrator, designer and muralist currently living and working in the Catskills – but with some very relevant Knoxville ties. Barnett is the nephew of local woodworking designer Ernie Gross and his wife Pam. He grew up in Knoxville and spent Tuesday evenings studying with Arnold Schwarzbart.

“David’s exhibit as the Schwarzbart Gallery’s first featured artist from outside this community is equally exciting and poignant for us,” said Deborah Oleshansky, Executive Director of the Knoxville Jewish Alliance. “We’re honored to welcome his work, and hope that many people will come to the Gallery to see it in the coming months.”

An Artist Reception will be held on Monday, August 29:
5:30 – 7:00 PM at the AJCC Schwarzbart Gallery
6800 Deane Hill Drive – Knoxville, TN
This is a free event, open to the community and members of all faiths.

David Barnett’s work will be on display at the Schwarzbart Gallery through September 2016. Individuals or groups may request a guided tour by contacting the Knoxville Jewish Alliance.

PalmSpringsatNoon

Palm Springs at Noon, by David Barnett.

Barnett’s work depicts moments in his own life, where the emotional atmosphere overwhelms the subject. He allows his paintings to emote rather than conceptualize. Using color and gesture, he situates his thoughts and memories firmly within an emotional context, separating them from progression and reason. He draws from varied influences, as far reaching as moviemakers like Charlie Kaufman and Denis Villeneuve, to those more closely related, like Peter Doig and Pierre Bonnard.

Visit www.blankwallproductions.com


Tomato Crush feeds thousands

The Knoxville Convention Center is inviting volunteers to assist in the second annual “Tomato Crush” event to prepare hundreds of healthy, premade meals for hungry families across East Tennessee. The event to benefit Second Harvest Food Bank of East Tennessee will be held in the Convention Center’s industrial kitchen on Saturday, Aug. 27, 2016 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Volunteers will assist in preparing fresh tomatoes for processing into red sauce to be used in a variety of dishes. Volunteers also are invited to bring locally grown or canned tomatoes to donate to Second Harvest.

“Last year, we had a great turnout to help the Knoxville Convention Center staff prepare more than 1,000 gallons of healthy, red tomato sauce for Second Harvest Food Bank,” Convention Center Executive Chef Chris Moore said. “We need volunteers of all ages and skill levels to help us exceed last year’s donation. No culinary experience is required. There are many different tasks, and several chefs are available to help supervise.”

Sysco, US Foods and local farmers have donated tomatoes, onions, garlic and other ingredients for volunteers to turn into sauce. Approximately 80 volunteers from the University of Tennessee Culinary Arts program have signed up for Saturday’s event.

The idea for the event stemmed from conversations about the lack of fresh, healthy ingredients in the local food system – and its effect on the population – among members of the Knoxville-Knox County Food Policy Council and Gail Root, programs director for Second Harvest.

This year’s Tomato Crush is being held in memory of one of the founders of the event, James Bosi.

Volunteers interested in participating in the event should meet at the Clinch Avenue entrance of the Convention Center between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. on Aug. 27. Participants will be taken to the industrial kitchen on the hour and half-hour. Parking is available at the Poplar Street lot and the Locust Street Garage.

If possible, interested volunteers should contact the Knoxville Convention Center in advance at 865-522- 5669. Notification of participation is requested but not required.


Next Fryer Talk is Aug 30

Knoxville – The East Tennessee Community Design Center (ETCDC) is pleased to announce the next in a series of informal conversations about community design, called Fryer Talks. The event will be August 30, 2016, from 5:00 -7:00 pm, at Dead End BBQ, 3621 Sutherland Avenue, Knoxville.

Fryer Talks are periodic forums, hosted by ETCDC, to engage the community in exploring relevant design issues in our region, and to remember a key founder, Gideon Fryer, who loved exploring ideas.

This talk, sponsored by RMX Technologies, LLC (www.rmxtechnologies.NET), will focus on best practices in zoning, in anticipation of a major update of the City Zoning Ordinance being conducted by the Metropolitan Planning Commission (MPC). MPC executive director, Gerald Green will kick off the discussion and attendees will enjoy a free-flowing discussion. Food and beverages will be available via Dead End BBQ.

Fryer Talks are held at various venues, focus on topics of interest on the day they occur, are informal, and have an air of both academics and frivolity. Over time, the talks are intended to engage East Tennesseans in thoughtful, passionate, free and open-minded conversations about design issues that matter.

Limited space is available so interested citizens are encouraged to RSVP via email to charis@communitydc.org, or call 865-525-9945.


Knoxville hosts Shoes for School

KNOXVILLE – More than 1,200 children received new tennis shoes and school supplies over the weekend thanks to the 14th annual “Shoes for School” event presented by the Knoxville Area Urban League, U.S. Cellular and East Tennessee Children’s Hospital.

Balloon release

Organizers, sponsors and volunteers prepare to kick off the 14th Annual “Shoes for School” event presented by the Knoxville Area Urban League (KAUL), U.S. Cellular and East Tennessee Children’s Hospital (ETCH) on Aug. 6 in Caswell Park. Pictured from left: City Councilman Dan Brown, KAUL president and CEO Phyllis Y. Nichols, Dana Dorcas of U.S. Cellular, Jody Nix of ETCH, Ola Blackmon-McBride of KAUL and other supporters. Photo submitted.

“A simple pair of shoes can help children start the school year off on the right foot – with confidence,” said Phyllis Y. Nichols, president and CEO of the Knoxville Area Urban League. “For the Knoxville Area Urban League staff and volunteers, this is a special day. ‘Shoes for Schools’ is one of our signature events, and it’s one of our most joyful days of the year to serve our community.”

The Knoxville Area Urban League, U.S. Cellular, East Tennessee Children’s Hospital and other sponsors hosted a festive atmosphere with food, games and inflatables provided by booth sponsors representing area businesses, nonprofit organizations, church groups and others. The event is a community effort that families and volunteers eagerly anticipate each year. Children participating in the event complete a pre-registration process with participating agencies.

“We greatly appreciate our staff and sponsors who give time and donations to make this event successful and meaningful for the children in need in our community,” Nichols said.

Since 1968, the Knoxville Area Urban League has assisted disadvantaged people attain social and economic stability and self-sufficiency through direct services and advocacy. The League works to provide a skilled and diverse workforce; to increase homeownership; to support economic and small business development, and to enhance education efforts for our youth. The Knoxville Area Urban League is a United Way partner agency and affiliate of the National Urban League. The League’s work and results are evident in the lives of the over 8,000 people it impacts each year.

For more information, call 865-524- 5511 or visit www.thekaul.org.


Emory Place plans Block Party

KNOXVILLE – The second annual Emory Place Block Party in North Knoxville will be held on Saturday, August 20, 2016 from 2 pm to 9 pm. The event has been organized to help bring attention to the historic Emory Place area. The goal of the block party is to create an opportunity for locals to get out and meet one another while experiencing what the area has to offer. The event is free to the public and everyone is welcome to join in the fun.

The 2016 Emory Place Block Party will have a more music centered focus with multiple acts preforming at various venues around Emory Place. All of the acts are Knoxville locals and the music is sure to please with a range including reggae, folk, indie-rock, jazz and more. A full line up, including performances by local dance groups, will be released in the coming weeks.

“Last year we had so many people say they didn’t know Emory Place existed before the block party. The area has seen a great amount of growth in the last year so this year it’s less about discovering Emory Place and more about celebrating it as a special little place in the city,” said block party organizer Whitney Manahan.


Norse genealogy topic of lecture

In a Brown Bag Lecture on Tuesday, July 26, 2016 local author and genealogist Ron Jones will examine the legacy of the Vikings, including current portrayals, common myths and misunderstandings, the nature of their society, and the extent of their travels. The Vikings are remembered in history as ruthless invaders and plunderers. Yet they also left a legacy of craftsmanship, poetry, superior ships, and seamanship. Who were they, what was their ancestral heritage, and what can modern DNA testing tell us about our Viking ancestry?

A member of the First Families of Tennessee, the Scottish Society of Knoxville, and several Scottish clan societies, Ron Jones is the author of three historical novels and is a frequent speaker about the Civil War, the American Revolution, and the Scots. The Knoxville native is a University of Tennessee graduate, registrar and past president of the Knoxville Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution, and a lifetime member and past commander of the Sons of Confederate Veterans.

The program is sponsored by the Gentry Griffey Funeral Chapel & Crematory and is free and open to the public. The lecture will begin at noon at the East Tennessee History Center, 601 S. Gay Street, Knoxville. Guests are invited to bring a “Brown Bag” lunch and enjoy the lecture. Soft drinks will be available. For more information on the lecture, exhibitions, or museum hours, call 865-215-8824 or visit the website at www.EastTNHistory.org.


History Center hosts First Families reunion

(Knoxville, TN) The East Tennessee Historical Society will commemorate the state’s 220th birthday with a First Families of Tennessee Reunion and Jubilee, August 19-21, 2016. The weekend will include a FFT dinner at Marble Springs, home of Tennessee Governor John Sevier, with period music, dances, and living history presentations, and tours of Marble Springs, with special time set aside for attendees to visit, compare research, and meet up with cousins.

A genealogy conference will focus on records and research methods for the pioneer period, as well as the history of the state’s early settlement, including the Watauga Association, the State of Franklin, county and state records, and more. The conference keynote speaker will be Troy Wayne Poteete, chief justice of the Cherokee Supreme Court, Tahlequah, Oklahoma, who will discuss the experiences of the Cherokee after they reached Oklahoma.

On Sunday, August 21, bus tours will travel to important pioneer sites in upper East Tennessee, such as Sycamore Shoals, Tipton-Haynes House, the site of the Battle of the State of Franklin, and replica of the State of Franklin log cabin capitol in Greeneville.

The First Families of Tennessee Reunion will be held in conjunction with the annual East Tennessee History Fair, which will take place on Saturday. The fair features traditional music, children’s games and activities, vintage films, living history presentations from the Cherokee to the Vietnam War, a History Hound costume competition, free admission to the Museum of East Tennessee History, bus tours to historic sites, and a birthday party for Davy Crockett, complete with cake.

First Families of Tennessee is a family heritage program of the East Tennessee Historical Society, with membership open to anyone who can prove descent from an ancestor who was in Tennessee by statehood in 1796. FFT has almost 16,000 members representing all fifty states and eight foreign countries.

All events are open to the public. Most East Tennessee History Fair activities are free. Pre-registration and a fee are required for participation in First Families of Tennessee events. For more information on the schedule of events, costs, and registration, see www.eastTNhistory.org/FFTReunion.

About the East Tennessee Historical Society

Established in 1834, the East Tennessee Historical Society has been helping East Tennesseans hold on to our unique heritage—recording the events, collecting the artifacts, and saving the stories that comprise the history we all share. The historical society pursues its education mission through publications, lectures, conferences, school programs, museum exhibits, and heritage programs such as the popular First Families of Tennessee and Civil War Families of Tennessee. The East Tennessee History Center houses the staff and programs of the East Tennessee Historical Society, the Museum of East Tennessee History, the Calvin M. McClung Historical Collection, and the Knox County Archives.


KWG hosts playwright Lisa Soland

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. – Award-winning author and playwright Lisa Soland will speak on “What the Playwright Can Teach the Writer” at the Thursday, Aug. 4, 2016 meeting of the Knoxville Writers’ Guild.

The meeting is open to the public and will begin at 7 p.m. in Central United Methodist Church’s Fellowship Hall at 201 E. Third Ave. Attendees should enter off of the large parking lot behind the church. A $2 donation is welcome at the door with free and accessible parking available.

At this meeting, Soland will showcase the dramatist’s craft to help writers improve their work.

“I will share tips and tactics, articulate conflict, and reveal character through action,” Soland said. “Writer’s dialogue can be stronger, characters more credible, and dramatic conflict more riveting. This is a great opportunity to gather practical advice and help narratives leap off the page.”

Lisa Soland has more than 40 internationally published plays and four children’s books. She has produced and/or directed over 80 productions and play readings, 55 of them original. Ms. Soland teaches privately, in the theatre department of Maryville College, and throughout the U.S. Soland is currently writing a one-man play on the life of World War I hero, Sgt. Alvin York, scheduled to open in the fall of 2017 at York’s childhood home in Pall Mall, Tenn.

The Knoxville Writers’ Guild exists to facilitate a broad and inclusive community for area writers, provide a forum for information, support and sharing among writers, help members improve and market their writing skills and promote writing and creativity. Additional information about KWG can be found at www.KnoxvilleWritersGuild.org.


Ice Cream Social for community planners

Knoxville, TN – An Ice Cream Sunday Social and Community Engagement Session will be held Sunday, July 17, 2016 from 1:00-3:30 pm. The East Tennessee Community Design Center (ETCDC) and the Knoxville-Knox County Metropolitan Planning Commission (MPC) will host the event to gather suggestions for the East Knox County Community Plan, being prepared by MPC. It will be at the Carter Senior Center, 9036 Asheville Hwy.

All interested groups, including residents, landowners, community representatives, business owners, and county officials, are encouraged to attend. The information gathered will provide important input for this planning process.

Community members will have the chance to review past plans, consider areas to preserve and for potential future development, identify challenges today, vision for tomorrow, planning priorities, and participate in a Visual Preference Survey. There will be a prize drawing at the end of the session.

East Knox County has wonderful assets such as historic communities, long-standing farms, beautiful vistas, open space, and is flanked by two scenic rivers. Growth is likely, but how future developments impact the environment and benefit the community is yet to be defined. A goal of the East Knox County Community Plan is to ensure that community members are engaged in the process and able to make suggestions, which impact the quality of any future growth. The plan will be a realistic and effective community resource with a set of concise action steps for implementation.

A community representative stakeholder committee has been established to help with the process of gathering input and evaluating recommendations. The group includes representatives from several East Knoxville communities along with key elected and appointed county officials.

Please RSVP via email to leslie@communitydc.org or call (865) 525-9945. Cruze Farm Ice Cream will be served.


CBT names new board members

KNOXVILLE, TN – The Clarence Brown Theatre, one of thirteen professional LORT (League of Regional Theatres) theatres on a university campus in the country, has announced its newly appointed 2016 Advisory Board members earlier this summer. The CBT Advisory Board is a vital link to the Greater Knoxville community, overseeing major events and fundraisers, the CBT Society Scholarship, and engaging the community to grow the theatre’s exposure and support.

“We continue our efforts to bring to our Advisory Board ever-greater diversity in experience and viewpoint. And we are delighted that our new Board members share with our current Advisory Board a passion for the theater and for our joint professional/educational mission,” said Calvin MacLean, Artistic Producing Director of the CBT. “Truly an extraordinary group of individuals from many different walks of life.”

The newly elected Advisory Board members of the Clarence Brown Theatre include: Ron Alexander (Willis of Tennessee); Michelle D. Commander (University of Tennessee); Michael Higdon (University of Tennessee); Margie Nichols (University of Tennessee, retired); Todd Richesin (UPSTAIRS at Todd Richesin Interiors); Ingrid Ruffin (University of Tennessee).

The 2016-2017 Chair of the Advisory Board is Brooks Clark, serving the second of his two-year term.

Other Advisory, Associate, and Emeritus Board members include: Nan Bobbett, Charlie Brakebill, Rick Carl, Joe De Fiore, Susan Farris, Coral Getino, Rosemary Gilliam, Michael Grider, Carmen Harb, Nazzy Hashemian, Amy Morris Hess, Julie Howard, Tony Johnson, Russ Johnston, Bob Lederer, Brenda Madigan, Angela Masini, Maureen Dunn McBride, Sheena McCall, John North, Townes Osborn, Bob Parrott, William Pender, Stephanie Piper, Whitney Ray-Dawson, Lee Riedinger, Susan Sgarlat, Jan Simek, Steve Smith, Lamarr Stout, Kay Stoutt, Rosalyn Tillman, Alice Torbett, Joe Trahern, Peggy Turner, Robin Turner, Lacy Wallace, Alexander Waters, Alice Wirth, Melanie Wood, and Wendy Wortham.

Under the leadership of Producing Artistic Director Calvin MacLean and Managing Director David B. Byrd, the CBT season runs from September through May and features eight productions ranging from musicals to drama.

For more information, tickets or accessibility accommodation requests including Open Captioning, ASL, and assistive technologies, please call the CBT Box Office at 865-974-5161 or visit online at clarencebrowntheatre.com/access.

 


Marble Springs celebrates July 4th

Marble Springs State Historic Site will celebrate the Fourth of July with a “Let Freedom Ring” Bell Ringing ceremony. This event is in collaboration with the General Henry Knox Chapter of the Sons of the Revolution and local reenacting community. This event will take place from 10am until 4pm on July 4th and is free to the public, though donations are appreciated.

Activities will include a bell ringing ceremony, a freedom pole, and a long hunter camp. For more information, please call (865)-573- 5508, email info@marblesprings.net or visit www.marblesprings.net. Details subject to change.

All activities will take place at the Marble Springs State Historic Site at 1220 W. Governor John Sevier Highway, Knoxville, TN 37920.

Programming assistance for this event is provided by Knox County. Marble Springs is funded under an agreement with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Tennessee Historical Commission, and supplemented by additional funds raised by the Governor John Sevier Memorial Association.

Marble Springs State Historic Site is the last remaining home of John Sevier. Born in Virginia in 1745, John Sevier made a name for himself as a Revolutionary War Hero during the Battle of Kings Mountain (1780), a key player and Governor of the short-lived State of Franklin (1784-1788), and ultimately was elected to serve as the first Governor of the State of Tennessee (1796).

Marble Springs was the approximate 350-acre farm that Sevier lived on from 1801-1815, the last years of his life. Sevier named his farm Marble Springs because of the Tennessee Rose Marble that was quarried on site and the natural springs that flowed on the property.

While visiting Marble Springs, you will have the opportunity to tour several historic structures that are designed to represent various aspects of John Sevier’s life. These structures include: the Tavern, Loom House, Smoke House, Spring House, the John Sevier Cabin and detached kitchen.


KWG offers memoir workshop

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. – The Knoxville Writers’ Guild (KWG) will offer an interactive, two-hour workshop, “Writing Your Story,” on Saturday, July 16, 2016 from 10 a.m. to noon at the Central United Methodist Church, 201 E. Third Avenue in Knoxville. Free and accessible parking is available.

Award-winning journalist, writer, and educator Bonny Millard will show participants how to turn personal stories into publishable narratives while considering the right vehicle: essay, profile, memoir or fiction. No previous writing or publishing experience is needed.

“As a journalist, one of my favorite assignments has been interviewing interesting people and writing their stories,” Millard said. “Those people’s stories have stuck with me through the years and remain as engaging now as they did then. I want to help others learn to find their stories and develop ways to get those stories down.”

To register for the workshop, visit http://knoxvillewritersguild.org/events/writing-your-stories-workshop or send a check to KWG Workshops, P.O. Box 10326, Knoxville, TN, 37939-0326. The workshop cost is $40. Members receive a 40 percent discount and student members receive a 50 percent discount.

About the Knoxville Writers’ Guild
The nonprofit Knoxville Writers’ Guild offers a broad and inclusive community for area writers and helps members improve and market their work. Meetings are at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month at Central United Methodist Church and are open to the public. Additional information about KWG can be found at www.KnoxvilleWritersGuild.org.


Knox Library Book Sale is June 25-28

Knox County Public Library’s 2016 Annual Used Book Sale will be held June 25–28, 2016 at the Jacob Building at Chilhowee Park in downtown Knoxville, Tennessee.

Thousands of beautiful used books will be on sale to benefit the Knox County Public Library. From Members Only Day on June 25 through Bag Sale Day on June 28, this year’s sale offers great book bargains for everyone.

Knoxville residents can support Friends of the Knox County Public Library in 2016 by registering a Kroger Plus Card and choosing Friends as the recipient.

Participants earn points for the library with every purchase that will be converted into dollars of support for Friends. Participants still receive Kroger Plus Card discounts just like before, and benefit the library at the same time.

Follow these easy steps to link your card to Friends: Register your card online—create an account, then enter your email, favorite store, and Kroger Plus Card number. At the bottom of your Account Summary, click Enroll under Community Rewards, and either enter our Kroger Non Profit number (65466) or just search for Friends of the Knox County Public Library.

UBS-slide-2016-922x364

 


Research skills workshop offered

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. – The Knoxville Writers’ Guild (KWG) will host a research workshop titled, “Smart Research Tactics for Writers”. It will be held on Saturday, June 4, 2016 from 10 a.m. to noon at Central United Methodist Church. The church is located at 201 E. Third Ave. in Knoxville. Accessible parking is available.

The workshop will be led by historical novelist, Pamela Schoenewaldt, and research librarian, Jamie Osborne, from the Knox County Public Library.

“Whatever your genre – fiction or non, journalism, memoir, poetry, or family history – this workshop will pay for itself many times over”, Osborne said. “We’ll show the wealth of material available through the Knox County Public Library, including the McClung Collection.”

Writers of any genre, any age, and any level of experience are welcome.
To register for the workshop, visit http://knoxvillewritersguild.org/events/smart-research-writers-workshop or send a check to KWG Workshops, P.O. Box 10326, Knoxville, TN, 37939-0326. Cost is $35 for KWG members, $40 for nonmembers, and $15 for students.

About the Knoxville Writers’ Guild

The Knoxville Writers’ Guild exists to facilitate a broad and inclusive community for area writers, provide a forum for information, support and sharing among writers, help members improve and market their writing skills and promote writing and creativity.

Additional information about KWG can be found at www.KnoxvilleWritersGuild.org.


Foundation honors fathering skills

The Beta Theta Boulé Foundation of Knoxville will host an inaugural Father’s Day luncheon to celebrate the contributions of eight Knoxville area men and present the first Zaevion Dobson Scholarship to a local high school student.

The event will be held June 19, 2016 from 1:30-4 p.m. at The Foundry On The Fair Site, 747 World’s Fair Park Drive, in downtown Knoxville. Proceeds from the luncheon will help fund future scholarships for meritorious high school students in the Knoxville area.

Each of the eight honorees who will be recognized have demonstrated strong “fathering” skills and modeled leadership, commitment to educational achievement and civic responsibility.

“We believe these fathers and mentors strive to teach youth about equality, mutual respect for others and a devotion to democratic traditions,” Foundation President Harold Hicks said. “That’s why the foundation will recognize them, along with our first Zaevion Dobson Scholarship recipient, at our Father’s Day luncheon and community celebration.”

The honorees include:

Daryl Arnold, pastor of Overcoming Believers Church

Charles Crowe, director of the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge Offices Procurement and Contracts Division

Steve Diggs, president and CEO of the Emerald Youth Foundation

Valentino Jefferson, quality engineer in Knoxville

Todd Kelly Sr., businessman and former University of Tennessee Vol football player

David Rausch, chief of the Knoxville Police Department

Rick Staples, vice president of 100 Black Men of Greater Knoxville

The late George Williams, longtime Alcoa public servant and co-founder of the Richard Williams Jr. Leadership Development Academy

Tickets are available by contacting Nathaniel Foster at 865-386- 4867 or natfoster01@gmail.com by June 1. Admission to the luncheon is $50, and a portion of the donation is tax deductible. Additional scholarship donations to the foundation are welcome and can be mailed to the Beta Theta Boulé Foundation at P.O. Box 23034, Knoxville, TN, 37933.

The Beta Theta Boulé Foundation is a nonprofit organization affiliated with the African-American professional fraternity, Sigma Pi Phi Incorporated. The Knoxville Chapter, called Beta Theta Boulé, was organized 20 years ago and has a notable record of community service.

 


Enjoy Jewish traditional foods

KNOXVILLE, TN – You might be familiar with bagels and lox, or challah bread. But what about shakshuka or mandlebrot? On May 22, 2016 the greater Knoxville community will have a chance to try both of these Jewish foods, and many more, at the first-ever “Knoshville” Jewish Food Festival. (The event’s name is a play on the Yiddish word “nosh,” which means to snack or nibble.)

bagels&lox

“Knoshville will bring together every Jewish organization in the Knoxville and Oak Ridge area, in celebration and appreciation of Jewish foods and cuisine. The entire community is invited to attend, nosh with us, and learn about the foods that bring us together,” says Deborah Oleshansky, Executive Director of the Knoxville Jewish Alliance. “It’s going to be very fun, and also very delicious.”

Knoshville Jewish Food Festival
Sunday, May 22 • 11:00AM – 3:00PM
Arnstein Jewish Community Center (AJCC), 6800 Deane Hill Drive
Admission is free; minimum food purchase of $10.00
The entire community is invited to attend and nosh! (RAIN OR SHINE.)

Menu items to include:
Bagels and lox (smoked salmon); Shakshuka (Middle Eastern spicy baked egg dish); Bundt cakes; “black and white” cookies; mandlebrot (it’s like biscotti, but better) potato latkes (pancakes); potato knishes (delicious filling covered with dough and baked or fried); matzah ball soup (dumplings in broth); challah (Jewish egg bread)

Please note: In respect of kashrut, the kosher Jewish dietary laws and traditions, no meat or poultry items will be available at this event. Dairy, fish and vegetarian items and some gluten-free items will be available. The Knoxville Jewish Alliance looks forward to announcing a kosher deli event in Fall 2016. Stay tuned!

Participating organizations: Knoxville Jewish Alliance, Heska Amuna Synagogue, Temple Beth El, Knoxville Jewish Day School, Chabad of Knoxville, Jewish Congregation of Oak Ridge, the local chapters of Hadassah and BBYO, and the Young Jewish Adults of Knoxville.

Knoshville will also feature Israeli dancing, music, and an art gallery. An AJCC pool open house will occur from 1:00PM – 5:00PM; pool use is free to the community.


Book explores nature of the universe

CELEBRATE KNOXVILLE – It’s National Star Wars Day, and Celebrate Knoxville spent a little time on the phone today with UCLA researcher and astrophysicist Dr. Jeff Zweerink to discuss his recent book, “Whose Afraid of the MultiVerse?” Written in easy-to-read style, with illustrations from popular culture including Star Wars movies, the book explores ideas about space, time, matter, and energy.

Zweerink

CK: Thanks for talking with us on National Star Wars Day, Dr. Zweerink!

JZ: Glad to do it. I didn’t realize that was today.

CK: Is most of your work analyzing data or do you actually get to do experiments with gamma rays?

JZ: About 40 percent of my time is spent on experiments. We’re currently building a balloon that (once we get the funding) we will send out to collect data.

CK: When you talk about The Big Bang in ‘Whose Afraid of the MultiVerse?’, why do you use the word ‘inflation’ and not ‘explosion’ to describe what happened?

JZ: It’s a scientific term to describe the expansion of the fabric of space.

CK: As a layperson, it makes me think that the universe took a breath, like lungs filling up. Doesn’t using the word ‘inflation’ imply that something was sucked in from somewhere else, and what would that substance be?

JZ: I can see what you mean by that. Scientists use this word to describe one possible (scenario) that is like a balloon with dots on it. When the fabric expands, the dots move apart.

CK: On page 14 of your book, you said ‘the only real controversial aspect of the level one model (of the universe) is its spacial extent, or size.’ Are there really scientists out there in California that think the universe has a finite size, like a box, or like the earth is sitting on the back of a tortoise (to use Native American mythology)?

JZ: You can think of the universe as flat, in three dimensions like a piece of paper, but there are other ways to think about it. In a closed model, like the one on page 11 of the book, the universe would be ball-shaped with closed geometry.

CK: In your introduction, you inform the reader that you are a scientist with a Christian world view. Do you think that God placed the planets in such a way that it models sub atomic particles and helps us understand the nature of the unseen?

JZ: I think that there are signs both in the way the universe has been presented and in what we know about quantum physics that reveals the designer, creator, God. Whether they are exact mirrors of each other, I can’t say.

CK: I love how you use illustrations from popular movies like Star Wars, The Matrix, and Back to the Future, to help people understand some of these interesting but complex scientific ideas. Have you ever seen the television series, Lost?

JZ: I have.

CK: Do you think (as an astrophysicist who is also a Christian) that the story is a good example of a shared consciousness, and that we, as believers, are co-creating Heaven, a shared consciousness, with God?

JZ: There are some serious (mainstream Christianity) theological issues with that point of view, especially about the soverignty of God. He doesn’t need our help.

CK: But we do co-create with Him when we pray, right? We make things happen that otherwise might not have happened unless we were involved?

JZ: Yes, we do. That’s an interesting point. Not certain that applies to Heaven, though. Would make some interesting further discussion. When I first became a scientist, I thought that science and faith were enemies. Now I have come to understand that revelations from both science and faith (Scriptural revelation) will inform the other and both will agree.

CK: In your book you said that “Scientists are aware that their equipment selects what data they measure.” How does that relate to changes made by the Observer in quantum physics?

JZ: That’s one of the philosophical questions discussed in the book–in having the point of view as the universe being designed by a Creator to support life, we ourselves are Observer and are working within the realm we’re working to describe. We can’t argue for a universe that does not support life, since we are here and we are alive.

CK: That’s the topic of a new book?

JZ: Yes, my new book is about Exoplanets, planets outside our solar system, exploring questions about the possibility of life out there.

CK: And if there is life out there, Jesus died for them too, and would not have to be born on their planet to (provide spiritual revelation) enlightenment?

JZ: If they are human. Jesus being born as human, the incarnation, is crucial.

CK: But what is human? Scripture says God created man from dirt. And any other planet out there would have dirt of some kind, right? Or are you saying in the case of life not being carbon-based…

JZ: Well now we’re talking about the same kinds of issues with the multiverse, where we have infinite possibilities in infinite time…

CK: And I love how in your book, you say that Marty McFly’s time line where he does not go back into the future still exists!

JZ: If the multiverse exists.

CK: And would you say that if the multiverse does exists, the life, death, resurrection of Christ is the only event that does happen without change, and is central to all other events, which could and would be free to happen any number of ways and still be meaningful?

JK: If the multiverse exists, that would have to be true. You know there is a group that meets in Knoxville that discusses these kinds of questions, and is open to all people interested in science, regardless of world view.

CK: I saw that. We actually have several science-related Meet Up groups in Knoxville. And of course Knoxville is a college town with the University of Tennessee, so there are plenty of opportunities to get involved with scientific studies there too. So fun! For my last question, how can people get a copy of “Whose Afraid of the MultiVerse?” or find out more about your work?

JZ: Send them to the web site, Reasons.org.


UT Gardens hosts plant sale

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. – Spring has sprung and now is the ideal time to shop for some unique plants for your garden. The University of Tennessee Gardens in Knoxville is holding its spring plant sale on Saturday, April 9, 2016 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

A preview sale will be held on Friday, April 8, from 4 p.m. until 7 p.m. for all UT employees, Gardens volunteers, and Friends of the UT Gardens. Friends will also receive a 10 percent discount on all purchases. If you are not a Friend yet, you will also be able to sign up for a membership at the preview sale and receive the member discount on purchases.

This year’s event will be offering brief informational sessions throughout the day on many of the choice selections of perennials, trees, shrubs, roses, delicious spring greens, cloned and new Lenten rose (hellebore) introductions, blueberry planting basics and flower garden design. Special guest and author, John Tullock will be speaking and signing his newest book: Seed to Supper: Growing and Cooking Great Food No Matter Where You Live–100+ Delicious Recipes & Growing Tips for Windowsills to Wide Open Spaces.

Featured spring-blooming perennials at the sale are bleeding hearts and baptisia (false indigo). Some edibles include Blueberry varieties: ‘Brightwell’, ‘Pink Lemonade’, ‘Tifblue’, and ‘Premier’. Thornless blackberries: ‘Natchez’ and ‘Triple Crown’. Figs: ‘Black Mission’, ‘Brown Turkey’, ‘Ischia’, and ‘Panache’. A vast array of herbs including Italian parsley, assorted mints, hardy selections of rosemary and lavender, and various thymes and sages. Ornamental perennials, trees and shrubs that will be available include a wide selection of choice conifer selections not easily found, the new ‘Alley Cat’ variegated redbud tree, the new seedless and double flower ‘Smoothie’ series of Rose-of-Sharon shrub, ‘Moonlight’ Chinese hydrangea vine, and new selections of Chinese fringe flower shrub.

UTKitchenGardens

UT Gardens is located at 2431 Joe Johnson Drive, Knoxville. The spring plant sale will be held on Saturday, April 9, 2016 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Photo by Celebrate Knoxville.


Premier wins motorcoach award

Knoxville’s Premier Transportation, a market leader in customer safety and driver welfare, has been named 2016 Operator of the Year by the Tennessee Motor Coach Association (TMCA).

“At Premier Transportation, customers and employees are our top priorities,” said Nick Cazana, owner of Premier Transportation. “We use safety features and the latest technology to make our customers’ trips the best they can be. Our driver programs ensure that our employees are rested, alert and ready to complete their routes.”

With Tennessee operations in Knoxville, Chattanooga and Greeneville, Premier Transportation’s fleet is 100-percent seat belt-equipped, which will become federal law for all buses and coaches by the end of 2017. Premier’s buses have GPS tracking systems so administrators can locate them in the event of an emergency. The tracking system encourages a proactive safety environment for the Department of Defense-certified fleet.

Premier Transportation is a charter motor coach company, headquartered in Knoxville, Tenn. With additional offices in Greeneville and Chattanooga, the company has a fleet of nearly 40 motor coaches, each seating from 14 to 81 passengers and including various amenities.

For more information, visit http://www.premiertransportation.net.


Writers meeting features improv

The art and science of improv will take center stage at the Thursday, April 7, 2016 meeting of the Knoxville Writers Guild. Noted improv performers James Newport, founder of the Gatlinburg Improv Festival, and Paul Simmons, a founder of Einstein Simplified improv troupe, will speak.

The meeting will be in the fellowship hall of Central United Methodist Church, 201 3rd Avenue in Knoxville, which is handicapped accessible The meeting is open to the public. A $2 donation is suggested.

Improv, according to the Einstein Simplified website, is comedy in which “one or more performers present unscripted material, such as games, scenes, monologues, musical montages, what-have-you, before an audience; usually basing this material on suggestions received from the audience. This is not sketch comedy (i.e. Mad TV, Saturday Night Live or The Carol Burnett Show). Nor is it stand-up comedy.”

Newport has nearly 30 years of improv performing, directing, and teaching experience. Before moving to the Knoxville area, Newport performed with SAK Theatre and Comedy Lab, in in Orlando, FL, where he was performer, teacher, and then SAK’s Artistic and Managing Director.

Simmons was a co-founder of Einstein Simplified and has taught many courses in comedy and improv over the years. Einstein Simplified has been entertaining Knoxville, TN and the surrounding area since 1994. The troupe has performed more than 1100 shows of comedy improv. It now performs at 8:15 p.m. every Tuesday at Scruffy City Hall on Market Square.


Residents CBID meeting tonight

The Downtown Knoxville Central Business Improvement District will host a residents meeting on March 29, 2016 at the Knoxville Chamber office, 17 Market Square, Suite 201. Residents are invited for a social time starting at 5:45 p.m.

The evening’s program agenda includes a panel discussion from 6:15pm – 7:00pm. The topic is “Property Management: 101, What Every Residential Property Owner Should Know.”

Discussion will focus on three different types of Home Owners Association (HOA) Management. The types include those organizations that hire an in-house employee to manage their HOA (presented by Greg Sherrill), those that have a contract with an outside agency to manage the HOA (presented by Rhonda Bird), and “Do It Yourself” HOAs that are self-managed by owners (presented by Amanda Mohney).

For more information, contact Michele Hummel at 865-246-2654.


Girl Scouts name Fugate CEO

The Girl Scout Council of Southern Appalachian’s (GSCSA) board of directors has named appointed Lynne Lawson Fugate as CEO of the council following an extensive search process.

Lynne Fugate

Lynne Lawson Fugate Fugate, former Executive Director for Nine Counties, One Vision from 1999-2005, has been named CEO of The Girl Scout Council of Southern Appalachia. She holds a B.S. in Business Administration from the University of Tennessee and currently serves on the Knox County Board of Education. Photo submitted.

“Lynne’s extensive experience as a leader and member of business and community organizations, combined with her proven leadership in the private and non-profit sectors, make her an ideal fit for GSCSA and its current needs,” said Jennifer Knight, Board Chair, Girl Scout Council of the Southern Appalachians. “Our search committee was impressed with her insights, intuition, and an eagerness to connect with the people who comprise our diverse stakeholders across the council. We congratulate Lynne and look forward to GSCSA flourishing under her leadership.”

Fugate was Executive Director for Nine Counties, One Vision from 1999-2005. She holds a B.S. in Business Administration from the University of Tennessee and currently serves on the Knox County Board of Education.

The Girl Scout Mission is to build girls of courage, confidence and character, who make the world a better place. The council has approximately 9,000 girl members and 2,000 adult volunteers in the Knoxville, Chattanooga, and Tri-Cities metros. Membership is always open to girls and volunteers.


KWG hosts local publisher

Knoxville Writers’ Guild will host local publishing marketer Caitlin Hamilton Summie at their March 3, 2016 program.

The event, which will be open to the public, will begin at 7 p.m. in Central United Methodist Church’s Fellowship Hall at 201 E. Third Ave. Attendees should enter off of the large parking lot behind the church. A $2 donation is requested at the door. The building is handicapped accessible.

Hamilton Summie is a book marketer and publicist who works with small and large house authors, as well as the self-published, to promote their works. She is the former marketing director of MacMurray & Beck, BlueHen Books/Penguin Putnam, and founded her own firm in 2003. In addition to marketing, she has also published both short stories and poems, and was an independent bookseller.

“I’m excited to discuss publicity basics, the importance of marketing for authors, and take questions from local writers,” Caitlin said. “I want writers to know what it takes to make our voices heard in 2016!”

The Knoxville Writers’ Guild exists to facilitate a broad and inclusive community for area writers, provide a forum for information, support and sharing among writers, help members improve and market their writing skills and promote writing and creativity.


Cloggers dance into Knoxville

More than 650 participants will compete at the Clogging Champions of America’s (CCA) 19th annual National Showdown of Champions at the Knoxville Civic Auditorium on Friday, Jan. 22, and Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016. To receive an invitation for this competition, teams and individuals must have won or placed in a regional competition.

The competition features individual dancers and teams from 20 states who will compete in multiple categories. Saturday’s schedule includes the team dance competitions beginning at 7:30 a.m. with an award ceremony concluding the day’s events at midnight. The clogging team routines features between 10 and 15 dancers and often incorporates other genres of dance, including jazz and hip hop.

“This is one of the largest and prestigious clogging competitions in the country,” CCA president Lynne Ogle said. “Clogging is family-oriented and fun for all ages. The event is open to the public, so I hope that people will come down and see what clogging is all about.”

The Showdown of Champions is open to the public for an admission of $10 per day. The Knoxville Civic Auditorium and Coliseum is conveniently located near the junction of Interstates 75 and 40 and sits downtown near the University of Tennessee campus.

 


KWG offers slam poetry workshop

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. – Hip-hop spoken word artist and six-time nationally ranked slam poet Black Atticus will teach the “Write or Die” workshop with slam-poetry techniques from 1 to 3 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 27, 2016 at Central United Methodist Church’s Fellowship Hall at 201 E. Third Ave.

Sponsored by the Knoxville Writers’ Guild, cost is $35 for KWG members and $40 for nonmembers. The building is handicapped accessible.

Atticus will walk attendees through the thought process and techniques he’s used when coaching other poetry slam teams. These will involve his newest book and CD, “Park City Pedestrian”.

“I’m excited to help aspiring poets enhance their basic understanding of one’s audience, as well as use of one’s voice,” Atticus said. “My workshop is based around one sole principal: we can’t begin to heal from our troubles or approach our problems if we can’t even talk about them. Before we get to that stage, we have to be able to at least write about it first.”

To register for the workshop, visit http://knoxvillewritersguild.org/events/write-or-die-slam-poetry-workshop or send your check to KWG Workshops, P.O. Box 10326, Knoxville, TN, 37939-0326.

For more information about Atticus, visit his website: http://blackatticus.wix.com/officialhomepage#!biography

About the Knoxville Writers’ Guild

The Knoxville Writers’ Guild exists to facilitate a broad and inclusive community for area writers, provide a forum for information, support and sharing among writers, help members improve and market their writing skills and promote writing and creativity. Additional information about KWG can be found at www.KnoxvilleWritersGuild.org.

 


Tiger Lily presents A Doll’s House

Knoxville’s Tiger Lily Theatre Company is pleased to present Henrik Ibsen’s timeless play “A Doll’s House.” Performances are Friday, December 11, 2015 at 8pm, Saturday, December 12th at 8pm, and Sunday, December 13th at 2pm. Tickets are $15 for adults, $12 for students.

Reimagined against a post-depression American backdrop, this this production of Ibsen’s most famous play highlights the timelessness of a woman’s struggle against the confines of societal norms and a marriage that is not what it seems.

Featuring a cast of local actors, this production will take place at Broadway Academy of Performing Arts, 706 N. Broadway St, for one weekend only. Parking is available at the rear of Broadway Academy on Lamar St.

Tiger Lily Theatre is dedicated to furthering opportunities for women in the Knoxville arts community and was recently selected to represent the state of Tennessee in the 2016 Southeastern Theatre Conference Community Theatre Festival Competition.

Tiger Lily currently produces two performances per season, including a series of short, original works in the spring. Submissions for the short play production are accepted via email at tigerlilytheatre@yahoo.com.

 


Knoxville Writers host holiday meetup

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. – Members of the Knoxville Writers’ Guild writing groups will share their works and hold a mix and mingle potluck for the 2015 December monthly program. Both current members and those simply curious about joining the guild are encouraged to attend and to bring a covered dish.

The event, which will be open to the public, will begin at 7 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 3 at Central United Methodist Church’s Fellowship Hall, 201 E. Third Ave. CUMC is a new venue for monthly KWG programs, and attendees should enter off of the large parking lot behind the church. A $2 donation is requested at the door. The building is handicapped accessible.

About the new venue, KWG president, Donna Kapa, said, “The church can host our general meetings as well as our workshops in a variety of comfortable, hospitable and affordable rooms.”

More than 15 writing groups are currently part of the KWG, with genres including poetry, playwriting, literary fiction, crime and mystery, sci-fi/fantasy, prompt writing and creative non-fiction. The guild also features two groups specifically designed for teen writers. A representative from most groups will be available, and writers are encouraged to bring copies of their books to sell in anticipation of the holidays. Sales tables will also be provided for those KWG members not currently part of one of the groups.

The Knoxville Writers’ Guild exists to facilitate a broad and inclusive community for area writers, provide a forum for information, support and sharing among writers, help members improve and market their writing skills and promote writing and creativity. Additional information about KWG can be found at www.KnoxvilleWritersGuild.org.


Premier Transportation expands fleet

Premier Transportation continues its expansion with the acquisition of Chattanooga-based All Aboard USA, bringing the Knoxville company’s total fleet to nearly 40 motor coaches stationed throughout East Tennessee.

“This pivotal expansion positions Premier as the leading provider of charter coaches in East Tennessee,” said Nick Cazana, Premier Transportation owner. “Having established offices in Greeneville and Knoxville, we viewed Chattanooga as a natural fit to allow us to better serve the region.”

The company’s new location will be known as Premier Transportation – Chattanooga, with the name change official Nov. 24. The operation initially will include five motor coaches and is expected to double in size over the next year. The additional office brings Premier’s total fleet of motor coaches to nearly 40 vehicles.

Randy Ingram, All Aboard owner and operator, has joined Premier Transportation to manage the Chattanooga location, which brings the Premier Transportation team to 85 employees.

All Aboard USA will maintain its tour business in the market. Tour locations include Atlanta, GA; Charleston, SC; Nashville, TN; New York City, NY; and Washington, D.C., among others.

“We are impressed with Premier Transportation’s solid reputation,” Ingram, who was a founding member of All Aboard USA, said. “We share the commitment to follow a strict set of ethical, financial and professional standards. I’m pleased to have this opportunity to offer even better service to our current customers and grow to reach a new customer base.”

The 2015 expansion into Chattanooga follows Premier’s 2014 merger with Greene Coach Company Inc. of Greeneville.

Premier’s priority of “Safety First” and an unwavering commitment to customer service will be the company standards in all locations, as will stringent equipment safety inspections, strict hiring policies for drivers and ongoing training requirements. Seatbelts, Wi-Fi and satellite television are among the safety benefits and amenities offered to groups using Premier coaches.


Ramsey House plans holiday events

Historic Ramsey House will hold its Annual Candlelight Tour on Sunday, December 13, 2015 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Enjoy holiday treats, Christmas carols, and tours of the beautifully decorated, historic home. Admission is free, but donations are appreciated.

The annual Ramsey House wreath workshop will be held on Saturday, December 12, 2015 starting at 12:30 p.m. with refreshments; instruction begins at 1 p.m. Attendees need to bring a pair of small garden shears and garden gloves. Every year Julia Shiflett and her “wreath elves” pick the finest fresh greens and holly berries, tie beautiful bows, and find the most fragrant cloves and oranges for participants to make a beautiful holiday wreath and pomander.The cost of the workshop is $35 per person. For more information or reservations, call Historic Ramsey House at 865-546-0745.

Christmas Dinner with the Ramsey’s will be held December 4-8 starting at 6:30 p.m. each night. Each evening will feature a candlelight tour of the beautifully decorated home and lovely holiday dinner prepared by Rosa’s Catering. The dinner will be held in the 1797 home of Francis Alexander Ramsey, his wife Peggy, and their children. This is a great opportunity to entertain the special people in your life, employees, or clients. Seating for a total of twenty guests in the dining room and the parlor is available each evening, and individual ticket purchases are also welcome. All proceeds go directly to Historic Ramsey House. Reservations are a must and will be taken on a first-come, first-serve basis. Tickets are $125 per person ($100 of the cost is a tax-deductible donation). For more information or reservations, call Historic Ramsey House at 865-546-0745.


4th & Gill hosts ARToberfest

The Historic Fourth and Gill neighborhood in Knoxville hosts the 2nd Annual ARToberfest from 2-9pm on Saturday, October 24, 2015. The celebration takes place on Morgan Street, between Gratz Street and Third Avenue near Central United Methodist Church.

An ever-expanding event for the whole family, ARToberfest festivities include a showcase featuring over 50 art vendors, live music by the Knoxville Polka Kings, Misty Mountain String Band, and Uptown Stomp, artistry by the Cattywampus puppets, a chalk walk, geocaching, and the Tennessee at Alabama game on the big screen. The standard fare is brats (meat and vegetarian), beer, wine, and non-alcoholic beverage options.

Tickets cost only $10, and an advanced ticket purchase comes with one free beverage of choice; kids 12 years old and under are admitted free of charge.

Located less than two miles from downtown Knoxville, the Historic Fourth and Gill neighborhood features over 280 residential structures, including single-family homes, duplexes, and apartment and condominium buildings.

Visit www.artoberfestknox.com.


Parkridge home tour is October 25

The Historic Parkridge Neighborhood will be hosting a 1945-Era Home Tour on Sunday, October 25, 2015 from 1:00-6:00 p.m. Present-day Parkridge encompasses the early Edgewood subdivision which contains many houses built by George Barber, a 19th-century, Victorian house architect. This tour features a variety of homes with a focus on occupants during the Swing era, immediately after WWII. Learn about this history as you tour 8 open houses and 3 homes in the Park Place condominiums. Additionally, WWII living historians will help set the ambiance. Park Place will open up the condos and Swing Dancing with period music will be offered in their gymnasium at 6pm, following the main portion of the home tour. Ticket holders may participate in the dancing at no additional cost.

The homes will span the eras from the 1890’s to the 1945, and are good examples of the ongoing revitalization of the neighborhood. In addition, a walking tour of 20 homes not open to the public will be included. The walking tour will focus on the history of the homes and their former occupants in 1945.

Tickets are $10 per person if purchased in advance and $12 on the day of the event. Children under 12 are admitted for free. Parking is available at the Ashley Nicole Park, 620 Winona Street, 37917. Tickets may be purchased in advance at K-Brew, Saw Works Brewery, Three Rivers Market, or until 4 pm the day of the tour at Ashley Nicole Park. Walking is necessary and many houses have steps. Parkridge is a bike-able neighborhood and tour-goers are welcome to ride bicycles.
For more information call 865-951-6614.

History of Historic Parkridge

Parkridge is an urban neighborhood built mostly from the 1880s to the 1930s. The houses are close together, with sidewalks connecting its residences to major roadways and businesses. The neighborhood is less than 2 miles from downtown Knoxville. Parkridge has gained notoriety for having the largest concentration of George Barber homes in the nation. This area has been known as part of Park City to residents and former residents for over 100 years. Today the Park City Historic District is on the National Register of Historic Places, and the Edgewood Park section, with its concentration of Barber-design houses, has historic overlay protection.


KWG names 2015 writing awards

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. – The Knoxville Writers’ Guild is excited to announce the winners of its annual writing contest. Out of the many entries received, 14 writers were selected for recognition in the 2015 Knoxville Writers’ Guild Contests. Winners for each category are listed below:

Leslie Garrett Award for Literary Fiction
First Place: “An Encounter with Yesterday” by Susan Lindsley
Second Place: “An Immodest Proposal” by Jane Sasser
Third Place: “Living in Shitsville” by Amber Hart

Genre Fiction
First Place: “The Old Lady and the Coyotes” by Susan Lindsley

Novel Excerpt
First Place: “Return to Taylor’s Crossing” by Janie Dempsey Watts
Second Place: “Prosperity” by Gerhard Schneibel
Third Place: “Our Little Domestic Heroine” by Carol J. Luther

Creative Nonfiction
First Place: “Hangin’ at the Dump” by Linda Myers
Second Place: “Accommodation” by Stephanie Levy
Third Place: “At the Clinic” by Diane Montgomery

Libba Moore Gray Award for Poetry
First Place: “Learning to Mother” by Connie Jordan Green
Second Place: “Flesh and Blood” by Carlos Andres Gomez
Third Place: “Migraineur” by Jane Sasser

Young Writers
First Place: “At the End of Tornado Alley” by Delaney Thurston

KWG congratulates the winners and expresses its thanks to all who participated. For more information about future contests and events, visit www.knoxvillewritersguild.org.

 


Talent Trek agency hosts workshop

On Saturday, Sept. 19, 2015, Knoxville’s own Talent Trek Agency will host a workshop about all aspects of talent representation and management as part of this year’s Knoxville Film Festival. Katherine Olsen, a New York talent manager, and opera star and actor Gary Simpson (THE KNICK) will share their experience with attendees.

The workshop takes place at Regal Downtown West Cinema 8 at 10 am.

Olsen is the Founder of Encompass Arts LLC in New York City. Her talent management clients include leading Broadway, Film, Stage and Operatic talent. They include: John Cullum, television, film screen and theater star, Anthony Laciura of HBO’s “Boardwalk Empire” Marcello Giordani, leading tenor of the Metropolitan Opera, Two-Time GRAMMY AWARD winner, Sylvia McNair as well as Tony Award Nominee, Willy Falk. Encompass Arts has actors this season on NASHVILLE, ORANGE IS THE NEW BLACK, THE KNICK, UNFORGETTABLE, THE GOOD WIFE, among many others.

GARY SIMPSON is a Metropolitan Opera Principle Artist and can be seen as Hobart Showalter in HBO/Cinemax’s new series “The Knick” starring Clive Owen and directed by Steven Soderbergh

The mission of the Knoxville Film Festival is to recognize and celebrate the art of independent cinema. It exists to provide a stimulating gathering in which the lovers and creators of independent cinema come together to see and discuss interesting works from local, regional, national, and international filmmakers.

For more information call 865.637.4561.


Melnik joins Keep Knoxville Beautiful

Knoxville, TN – The Board of Directors of Keep Knoxville Beautiful is pleased to announce that Patience Melnik has joined the organization as executive director. Patience brings a background in nonprofit project development and management to the position.

“The wealth of experience Patience has in grant writing and relationship building made her an ideal candidate for this position,” said Bob Graves, president of the board of directors.  “We are energized by her presence and look forward to her leadership as we continue the important work of keeping Knoxville beautiful.”

Patience fills the vacancy created by former Executive Director Allison Teeter’s departure in May to join the Knox County Health Department.

Before joining Keep Knoxville Beautiful, Patience served as Director of Environmental Health Programs at the Tennessee Clean Water Network (TCWN), a nonprofit statewide environmental organization located in Knoxville, Tennessee. At TCWN, she was instrumental in creating, funding, and implementing the Bringing Tap Back project, which increased access to drinking water in Tennessee’s public places by providing water bottle refill stations to schools, universities, municipalities, and other organizations.

“I am thrilled to join Keep Knoxville Beautiful,” Melnik said. “At nearly 40 years old, the organization has such a long history of partnerships with other organizations and with countless volunteers to make Knoxville a cleaner, greener, and more beautiful place to live. It is an honor to have the opportunity to build upon the foundation laid by so many people over so many years.”

To welcome Patience, please join Keep Knoxville Beautiful for a Meet and Greet at the Fieldhouse Social located at 2525 UT Commons Way on Thursday, August 27, 2015 from 5:30 until 7pm.


Knoxville hosts preservation conference

The annual East Tennessee Preservation Conference will be held in Knoxville on October 22-24, 2015. This popular event emphasizes finding solutions for securing the future of historic places while capitalizing on cultural heritage.

Primary sessions will be held at the East Tennessee History Center and the conference will include an opening reception and hands-on workshops at Historic Westwood. This year’s keynote speaker and special guest will be Donovan Rypkema from Washington, DC, recognized as an industry leader in the economics of preserving historic structures.

The Tennessee Historical Commission will be providing specialized training for Certified Local Government and Historic Zoning Commission members and AIA continuing education credits will once again be offered.

A variety of walking tours to sites in downtown Knoxville will be available.

Register for the conference by calling 865-523-8008.

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The city of Knoxville and East Tennessee offer a wealth of historic buildings and cultural opportunities for residents and visitors alike. Photo of downtown Knoxville in the early 1900s courtesy the East Tennessee Historical Society.

 


Knoxville Urban League donates shoes

Thanks to the efforts of the Knoxville Area Urban League and Enterprise Rent-A-Car, more than 1,200 children received new tennis shoes and school supplies at the 13th annual Shoes for School held this past weekend.

The event at Caswell Park was timed for the start of the new academic year, giving the children a boost of confidence and sending them into the classroom on the right foot. Each child received shoes and an assortment of school supplies.

“Shoes for Schools is one of the Knoxville Area Urban League’s signature community events, and it’s one of my favorite days at work,” said Phyllis Y. Nichols, president and CEO of the Knoxville Area Urban League. “The joy we share with the children as we give them new shoes and school supplies is irreplaceable for us and for them.”

2015-08 Knoxville Area Urban League Shoes for Schools

The Urban League, Enterprise and other sponsors hosted a festive atmosphere with food, games and inflatables provided by booth sponsors representing area businesses, nonprofit organizations, church groups and others. The Shoes For School event is a community effort and something that families and volunteers eagerly anticipate each year. Photo submitted.

“We are so grateful for our staff and sponsors who work so hard to make this event successful each year,” Nichols said.

Since 1968, the Knoxville Area Urban League has assisted disadvantaged people attain social and economic stability and self-sufficiency through direct services and advocacy. The League works to provide a skilled and diverse workforce; to increase homeownership; to support economic and small business development, and to enhance education efforts for youth. The Knoxville Area Urban League is a United Way partner agency and affiliate of the National Urban League. The League’s work and results are evident in the lives of the over 8,000 people it impacts each year.

For more information, call 865-524-5511 or visit www.thekaul.org.


Democrat Women support education

KNOXVILLE, TN – When school starts back for the 2015-2016 term, students at Maynard Elementary School can expect a real treat. Free books are on the way.

Due to a program launched by Martha Rose Woodward, a retired school teacher, Betty Reddick, Democratic Women of Knoxville’s leader and Sid Gwyn, local businessman, students in grades 2nd through 5th will be given free books each to take home and keep.

More books will be given to the students during this school year in hopes of increasing reading practice. Democratic Women of Knoxville, a club that recently celebrated its 25th year, sponsors programs and events that support education.

As a long-time member of Friends of the Library, Woodward said that she negotiated with the group in order to purchase books left over from their big sale held in May at a discounted rate.

“After Betty’s group paid for the books, I selected the ones I knew would coordinate with the skills being taught in each grade. After I boxed up the books, we needed a place to store them. Betty was going to rent a storage unit, but my good friend, Sid Gwyn, had an empty house he offered as space for storage until time for school to begin,” said Woodward.

The books were sorted according to grade levels and placed in bags made by the members of the club from tee-shirts.

Contact was made with the principal of Maynard Elementary School, Kim Wilburn-Collum, who was thrilled for her students to have the opportunity to be given free books. A date was set and free books will be going home with the lucky students soon.

“We wanted a program like this one,” said Wilburn-Collum. “We just didn’t know how it might happen. This fits the needs of our students.”

Anyone in the community who would like to make a donation for the program may contact Betty Reddick via e mail at Jsrdk@aol.com.

Democratic Women of Knoxville meets on the first Monday of the month at 12:00 noon at the Knoxville-Oak Ridge Area Central Labor Council, located at 1522 Bill Williams Drive. Membership is open.

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Democratic Women of Knoxville’s Club made no-sew bags using old tee-shirts to hold the free books being distributed at Maynard Elementary School in Knoxville. Photo by M. Woodward.


Clarence Brown tickets on sale Aug 9

Individual Tickets for 2015/2016 Clarence Brown Theatre Season go on sale Sunday, August 9, 2015.

“Created right here in Knoxville for our community, the CBT’s 2015/2016 Season promises the absolute best in live theatre,” said David B. Byrd, CBT Managing Director. “From a hilarious send-up of one of motion picture’s greats, to dueling holiday offerings, to a stalwart of the musical theatre canon, there’s something for everyone this season. Don’t wait to purchase tickets and be in control by purchasing online, anytime.”

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The 2015/2016 Clarence Brown Theatre Season includes: “The 39 Steps” by Patrick Barlow; “Of Mice and Men” by John Steinbeck; “Mr. Burns, a Post-Electric Play” by Anne Washburn; “A Christmas Carol” by Charles Dickens; “The Santaland Diaries” by David Sedaris; “Titus Andronicus” by William Shakespeare; “A Lesson Before Dying” by Earnest J. Gaines (The CBT is pleased to be partnering with the Knox County Public Library on “The Big Read,” a series of ancillary events associated with this production and the novel by Ernest J. Gaines); “The Open Hand” – A CBT-Commissioned World Premiere by Rob Caisley; “South Pacific” with music by Richard Rodgers and lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II.

For more information, tickets or accessibility accommodation requests including Open Captioning, ASL, and assistive technologies, please call the CBT Box Office at 865-974-5161 or visit online at clarencebrowntheatre.com/access.


Editor offers fiction writing workshop

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. – Hugo and Stoker Award-nominated editor and publisher Jason Sizemore will speak at the Thursday, Aug. 6, 2015 program of the Knoxville Writers’ Guild. The event, which will be open to the public, will begin at 7 p.m. at the Laurel Theater, at the corner of Laurel Avenue and 16th Streets (in Fort Sanders). A $2 donation is requested at the door. The building is handicapped accessible. Additional parking is available at Redeemer Church of Knoxville, 1642 Highland Ave.

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Jason Sizemore is the owner/operator of Apex Publications, a small press that focuses on science fiction, fantasy and horror. Its “Apex Magazine” has been nominated for the Hugo Award three times. He is the featured speaker August 6, 2015 at the Knoxville Writers Guild August monthly program and will offer a hands-on writing workshop on Saturday, August 8, 2015. Registration for the workshop is available at www.KnoxvilleWritersGuild.org.

In addition, he’ll read a chapter from his latest book, “For Exposure: The Life and Times of a Small Press Publisher” (Apex 2015).

“I will read a condensed version of the chapter that relates slush pile facts and a couple of the more worrisome submissions I’ve received,” he said. “The authors will find it informative and hopefully entertaining.”

The book follows his unconventional professional path as it winds through a tiny, overheated Baptist church deep within the coal fields of Appalachia, Kentucky, past a busted printer and a self-serving boss that triggered an early mid-life crisis and the epiphany that he should open a magazine spreading the gospel of science fiction to the masses, all the way to WorldCon 2012 and his first Hugo Awards ceremony. For more information, visit www.jason-sizemore.com or www.apexbookcompany.com. Copies of “For Exposure” and his collection, “Ireedemable” (Seventh Star Press 2014), will be available for purchase at the program.

Sizemore also is slated to lead a workshop Saturday, Aug. 8 titled, “Writing Science Fiction and Fantasy: Liftoff!”The event is scheduled for 12:45-3:45, at  Central United Methodist Church, 201 3rd Avenue, Knoxville. (This is one block off Broadway in the 4th and Gill neighborhood.)

About the Knoxville Writers’ Guild

The Knoxville Writers’ Guild exists to facilitate a broad and inclusive community for area writers, provide a forum for information, support and sharing among writers, help members improve and market their writing skills and promote writing and creativity.

 


Five Points redevelopment begins

Knoxville’s Community Development Corporation has entered into an agreement with The Communities Group to serve as co-developer on upcoming phases of the Five Points revitalization.

“This relationship with The Communities Group is a very important one,” KCDC Executive Director and CEO Art Cate said. “We have searched for a master developer partner from candidates across the country and were tremendously impressed with the company’s expertise and decades of experience in affordable housing redevelopment. Its talented staff will be an asset to us for Five Points and other major development and redevelopment initiatives.”

The initial agreement with The Communities Group outlines a 50/50 co-developer relationship to assist KCDC staff with planning, design, land use, development, construction and the securing of financing on Phases 2 through 4 of the Five Points Master Plan.

“We are excited to formalize and expand our partnership with The Communities Group.” said Dan Murphy, chair of the KCDC Board of Commissioners. “As the housing and redevelopment authority of the City of Knoxville and Knox County, KCDC is a regional model of a progressive, innovative agency. With The Communities Group, we have access to even more knowledge, expertise and resources for local projects and to offer our partners in the region.”

KCDC, The Communities Group and Thomas Point Associates currently are working with the City of Knoxville on the Jackson Avenue predevelopment market study, which includes the KCDC-owned former sites of the McClung Warehouses. The report will guide the next steps of redevelopment in that area.

Based in Washington, D.C., The Communities Group is one of the top affordable housing development experts in the country. The firm has experience with redevelopment funded through various U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) programs and grants, including HOPE VI, Choice Neighborhoods and Neighborhood Stabilization Program grants, among others.

KCDC is the housing authority and redevelopment agency for Knoxville.

For more information, visit http://www.kcdc.org.


Knoxville hosts history fair

The 8th Annual East Tennessee History Fair takes place at the East Tennessee History Center and several downtown Knoxville locations from 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m., August 15, 2015.

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Historical re-enactors are a familiar site at the East Tennessee History Fair in downtown Knoxville. Here, a Civil War doctor explains surgical procedures at a booth display of authentic historical instruments.  File photo by Celebrate Knoxville.

Activities include a living history timeline, live music, historic crafts demonstrations, historical and genealogical groups from across the region, children’s crafts and activities, Davy Crockett’s birthday party, walking tours of downtown, Civil War bus tours and tours of Knoxville’s historic homes, tours of underground Gay Street, “History Hound” dog costume contest, free museum admission, Smoky Mountain film festival at the Tennessee Theatre, vintage baseball games at World’s Fair Park, art exhibits, miniature battles, traditional foods, book sales, and farmers market.

This event is free and open to the public.

The East Tennessee History Center is located at 601 S. Gay Street.


Knoxville great place to bike

Want to learn how to ride your bike safely in Knoxville? Need tips on which routes are best for getting to and from work on your bike?

Take the Ride Smart – Urban Biking 101 class – with I BIKE KNX.

I BIKE KNX promotes bicycling as part of the overall transportation system and is housed within the Knoxville Regional Transportation Planning Organization.

This 1-hour casual ride will teach you where to ride on the road, how to negotiate intersections, and other tips to make you more confident biking in traffic.

Email kelley.segars@knoxtrans.org if you’re interested and want to find out when the next class is available. There is a $15 fee.

In the meantime, enjoy this CelebrateKnoxville.com One Minute Bike Ride in Knoxville’s Old City video by Courtney Connors, June 2015.


KWG welcomes Jason Sizemore

Thinking about dipping your pen into the genre writing pool? The Knoxville Writers Guild welcomes Jason Sizemore, three-time Hugo Award nominee and editor-in-chief of Apex Publications, as featured speaker on August 6, 2015, at 7 p.m. at the Laurel Theater.

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The Knoxville Writers Guild welcomes Jason Sizemore, three-time Hugo Award nominee and editor-in-chief of Apex Publications, as featured speaker on August 6, 2015, at 7 p.m. at the Laurel Theater.

Apex Magazine is an online prose and poetry magazine of science fiction, fantasy, horror, and mash-ups of all three. Each month the magazine brings a mix of originals and reprints, interspersed with interviews and nonfiction.

Apex Magazine received a Best Semiprozine Hugo nomination in 2012, 2013, and 2014. The publication placed two stories in the 2010 Nebula Award category of Best Short Story, and Apex stories won the category in 2014 (“If You Were a Dinosaur My Love” by Rachel Swirsky) and again in 2015 (“Jackalope Wives” by Ursula Vernon. Dozen of stories have been selected for the annual Year’s Best anthologies over the past five years.

Attendees of the speaking engagement will be given an overview of genre market information, guidelines, and resources to help writers find homes for science fiction and fantasy manuscripts.

On Saturday, August 8, Sizemore’s follow-up seminar will cover more in depth which publishers to target, what to avoid in cover letters, tips on surviving the slush pile, popular agents, and a handful of insider tips from an experienced editor that might help give you a slight edge over other writers.

Both novel and short fiction markets will be covered in the seminar and cost is $40 to attend.

To register for the workshop, Email jason@apexbookcompany.com.

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Highlands benefits Knox Heritage

To commemorate the Highlands Grill’s 5th Anniversary, Tom Weiss is hosting an elegant dinner party in support of historic preservation. The event takes place June 17, 2015, and all proceeds will support the Knox Heritage J. Allen Smith Endangered Properties Fund used to save threatened historic places across the region. Live jazz, delicious food and wine pairings will create a special evening to remember.

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Menu

Starter: Lump Blue Crab Cake, Fried Green Tomato Jalapeño Pepper Jelly, Remoulade

Salad: Tuscan Kale and Romaine Caesar with Cornbread Crouton, Kalamata Olives, Asiago Dressing OR Wedge of Iceberg with Highland’s Bleu Dressing, Blistered Tomatoes, Benton’s Bacon, Shaved Red Onion, Walnut Pesto

Entrée: Grilled 8oz Bison Center Cut New York Strip Prepared Medium Rare with Highland’s Potato Gratin, Haricots Verts, White Truffle Butter, Roasted Wild Mushrooms OR Pan Roasted Red Grouper with Lobster Creole Sauce, Smoked Gouda Grits, Sweet Corn & Okra Maque Choux

Dessert: Bourbon Pecan Pie with Crème Anglaise OR Strawberry Shortcake

Wine pairings will be featured with each course courtesy of Constellation Brands.

The Grill at Highlands is located at 4705 Old Kingston Pike. Cost is $100 per person.

For more details and to reserve your place, please contact Mickey Mallonee at mickey@knoxheritage.org or 865.523.8008.


KCDC elects board officers

Knoxville’s Community Development Corporation (KCDC) has announced the appointment of new board officers following its annual board meeting.

Dan Murphy, a University of Tennessee professor of accounting specializing in federal taxation, will serve as chairman. Murphy was appointed by Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero to the Board of Commissioners in 2013.

Jacqueline Arthur, general manager of the community-owned food cooperative Three Rivers Market, was appointed vice chairman. Arthur also was appointed to the KCDC board by Rogero in 2013.

Resident commissioner Phyllis Patrick, administrative assistant at Evergreen Presbyterian Ministries, Inc., will serve as treasurer. Art Cate, KCDC executive director and CEO, was elected secretary.

KCDC’s Board of Commissioners is a seven-member body appointed by the Knoxville mayor to oversee programs provided by the agency, including affordable public housing administration, redevelopment and rental assistance. The board members began their one-year term as officers at the board’s annual meeting on May 28.

Other board members are: John Winemiller, partner at the law firm Merchant & Gould; David Hutchins, architect and president of Hutchins Associates P.C.; Lisa Wagoner, supervisor of health services for Knox County Schools; and Dr. John Turner, retired senior vice president of education, training and diversity at the Tennessee Valley Authority.

Since 1936, KCDC has been dedicated to enhancing the quality of life for the citizens of Knoxville. KCDC’s mission is to improve and transform neighborhoods and communities by providing high-quality affordable housing, advancing development initiatives and fostering self-sufficiency.

For more information, call 865-403-1100 or visit http://www.kcdc.org.


Burke to speak to writers guild

KNOXVILLE, TN – On Thursday, June 4, 2015, the monthly meeting of the Knoxville Writers’ Guild will feature novelist and screenwriter Shannon Burke.

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Shannon Burke will read from his newest book, “Into the Savage Country” (Pantheon, February, 2015) at this event that is open to the public.

The event is 7 p.m. at the Laurel Theater, at the corner of Laurel Avenue and 16th Streets (in Fort Sanders). A $2 donation is requested at the door. The building is handicapped accessible. Additional parking is available at Redeemer Church of Knoxville, 1642 Highland Ave.

“Into the Savage Country” is a historical adventure novel that mostly takes place on a trapping brigade in the 1820s. It follows Burke’s successful first novels: “Safelight” (Random House 2005) and “Black Flies” (Soft Skull Press 2008) a New York Times Notable Book and a finalist for the Believer Book Award.


TN Arts announce grants

The Tennessee Arts Commission announces its popular Arts Build Communities (ABC) grant and will invest over $39,000 in East Tennessee arts projects and programs taking place August 16, 2015 through June 15, 2016. The funding, which will be distributed through the Arts & Culture Alliance of Greater Knoxville, provides vital financial support for projects that broaden public access to the arts and enhance the quality and viability of cultural arts experiences.

The ABC grants will be distributed throughout all arts disciplines as recognized by the Tennessee Arts Commission, including dance, music, opera/musical theatre, theatre, visual arts, design arts, crafts, photography, media arts, literature, interdisciplinary and folk arts.

ABC grants are available through the Arts & Culture Alliance for eligible arts and cultural organizations in Anderson, Blount, Campbell, Knox, Loudon, Monroe, Morgan, Pickett, Roane, Scott, Sevier, and Union counties. Applicants must be state-recognized, nonprofit 501(c)3 organizations or government entities and must be able to provide a dollar-for-dollar match towards the proposed project.

Awards range from $500 to $2,000. The online application deadline is 4:30 p.m. (CST) on Wednesday, July 1.

A free grant workshop for interested applicants will be held on Wednesday, April 29, from 1:30-3:00 PM at the Emporium Center, 100 S. Gay Street, in downtown Knoxville.  For directions and more information, please call (865) 523-7543.


Fourth and Gill tour scheduled

The Historic Fourth and Gill neighborhood in Knoxville will celebrate its 25th Anniversary Tour of Homes on Sunday, April 26, 2015 from 1-6pm. Participants will tour Knoxville’s premier historical districts and step inside several neighborhood homes and two condominiums inside the recently renovated Brownlow School Lofts. The Tour begins at the stately Central United Methodist Church, one of the city’s most beautiful examples of Gothic Revival architecture.

Tour guests can take a leisurely walk through the neighborhood to visit homes, or guests can ride a red trolley bus – with a resident tour guide host – from point to point. Tickets purchased on the Tour day cost $12 (free for children 12 and under) at the Central United Methodist Church (201 Third Avenue) from 1:00-5:00pm.

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The Fourth and Gill tour coincides with the Dogwood Arts Open Gardens and Walking Trails that showcase four neighborhood gardens and notable trees. Maps (which include addresses for the gardens) for the self-guided tour are located inside the special event mailbox on the west side of Luttrell Street, adjacent to the Brownlow School Lofts. Photo of downtown Knoxville dogwood trees by CelebrateKnoxville.com.

Located less than two miles from downtown Knoxville, the Historic Fourth and Gill neighborhood features over 280 residential structures, including single-family homes, duplexes, and apartment and condominium buildings. The Fourth and Gill Neighborhood Organization is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization whose purpose is to build and to sustain a vital urban community by protecting and preserving the historic architecture of the area and by promoting a strong sense of community. Organization contact is PO Box 3845, Knoxville, Tennessee, 37927-3845.


Knoxville hosts bike summit

City of Knoxville officials will present the finalized Bicycle Facilities Plan at a public meeting to be held Wednesday, April 8, 2015 at 6 p.m. at the East Tennessee History Center, 601 South Gay Street. The plan identifies the improvements that could develop a system of connected bike corridors, including on- and off-road facilities, that is focused on improving the accessibility, safety and convenience of traveling by bicycle.

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Knoxville city planners will present a map of the proposed corridor enhancements and the priority list of more than 100 projects including new bike lanes or other safety accommodations, to be designed to account for traffic flow and road conditions, at a public meeting in April. Photo by Celebrate Knoxville.

In addition, Knoxville is hosting the TN Bike Summit April 23 – 24, 2015. This event is a chance for the Knox area community to discuss how to build safe roads, strong communities, and a Tennessee where everyone is able to enjoy the benefits of bicycling and walking.

The keynote speakers for the Bike Summit are Gil Penalosa and Martha Roskowski, both of whom were featured speakers at the international Pro Walk/Pro Bike/Pro Place conference in 2014.

Visit knoxtrans.org.


Poets featured at Knoxville Writers Guild

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. – In celebration of National Poetry Month, the Knoxville Writers’ Guild will feature award-winning poets Connie Jordan Green and Art Stewart during its April 2015 program.

The event, which will be open to the public, will begin at 7 p.m., Thursday, April 2 at the Laurel Theater, at the corner of Laurel Avenue and 16th Streets (in Fort Sanders). A $2 donation is requested at the door. The building is handicapped accessible. Additional parking is available at Redeemer Church of Knoxville, 1642 Highland Ave.

Stewart and Green both have been recognized by the East Tennessee Writers Hall of Fame. He is a 2013 inductee into the hall of fame, and she has received a Lifetime Achievement Award.

Books from both poets will be available for purchase at the program.


IJAMS hosts Bird Nesting program

KNOXVILLE – Ready to get out and do something fun this weekend? Join IJAMS Nature Center senior naturalist Stephen Lyn Bales Saturday, March 7, 2015, from 9-11 a.m. for an indoor program on “Bird Nesting.”

Bluebirds need pine needles, titmice need hair, wrens need a hidey-hole and robins just need a flat surface and mud. Learn quick tips on how you can help your backyard birds nest successfully. After the program, enjoy hiking around the IJAMS Nature Center.

The fee for the Bird Nesting program is $7 for Ijams members and $12 for non-members.

IJAMS’ chef Peg will also be serving a traditional breakfast.

Please call (865) 577-4717, ext. 110 to register.

IJAMS Nature Center is a 300-acre urban greenspace and environmental learning center in downtown Knoxville.


Don Pablos brings Tex Mex flavor

(Feb. 25, 2015) Knoxville native Mark Vandewart says he is thrilled to be deep in the heart of Texas right now, being trained to start his new management gig with local restaurant Don Pablos.

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“It’s an 8-week training program here in Fort Worth, and I am really loving the family atmosphere of this business,” Vandewart told Celebrate Knoxville in a phone interview. “I wil start my new job at the Don Pablos in Knox Center Mall in March, so I only have a few weeks left here before returning.”

Vandewart says the restaurant concept of “Big Tex, Bold Mex,” is about fresh food with flavors that are so familiar in Texas where the restaurant began in Lubbock.

“My training has been so extensive, from learning guest satisfaction policies to safety to hosting/serving to bartending,” Vandewart said. “I love how the crew works together here and I love the detail-oriented menu. I have already had a lot of restaurant experience but this is a really great concept. Don Pablos has a really good following with repeat business and groups.”

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A quick visit to the Don Pablos restaurant web page highlights some of the menu items: Cinco Combo, which is crispy beef taco, a soft chicken taco plus three enchiladas – cheese & onion, beef, and chicken. (Served with Mexican rice and choice of one side.)

“I hope that Celebrate Knoxville readers will visit me in Knox Center Mall after March 18, and say ‘hi,'” Vandewart said. “We have had our share of cold weather even out here but I am anxious for things to warm up and looking forward to getting back to East Tennessee.”


Sustainable Coffee Bread recipe

Sustainable Cooking by Mary June Thompson, Food Writer, Celebrate Knoxville, February 20, 2015. – There are a lot of ways to utilize a sustainable cooking philosophy in the kitchen, and not just with food. At my house, we drink a lot of coffee, and we prefer a specific brand that is sold in tin cans. Not only do those cans keep the coffee very fresh, but they have a myriad of other handy uses once the coffee is consumed, including bacon grease cans, paint cans, storage cans, and even baking vessels.

Bread that has finished baking in the can

So today I would like to share a recipe I developed that not only reuses the coffee grounds, but also repurposes the coffee tin as well. It would also make a great homemade gift idea, as the bread is actually very simple to make, especially for a yeast bread, and a load of bread baked in a coffee can makes a whimsical and fun presentation.

My bread is purposely quite a bit less sweet than one would expect a chocolate bread to be. I made it this way for a couple of reasons: First, the coffee notes in the bread are more noticeable with less sugar, and second, I wanted a bread that I could enhance with sugary things and not be overwhelmed by an excess of sweetness. This bread is absolutely perfect with a smear of Nutella, and it is also complemented by maple syrup when used as the basis for chocolate French toast. Add some fresh sliced strawberries on top, and you’ve got a perfect breakfast, brunch, or snack time treat that is fresh, healthy, and sustainable.

A Few Simple Ingredients Make a Lovely Home Baked Bread

Chocolate Coffee Can Bread

Special Equipment:

Candy thermometer

Cheesecloth

½ pound metal coffee can (Note: Don’t use one with a coated lining for health
reasons!)

Kitchen string

Ingredients:

Non-stick cooking spray

½ cup milk

2 Tablespoons used coffee grounds

1 teaspoon fast-acting yeast

1 Tablespoon sugar

½ teaspoon kosher salt

¾ cup bread flour, plus an extra cup or so for kneading

¼ cup cocoa powder

2 Tablespoons neutral-tasting oil, such as canola, vegetable, or safflower

1 large egg, at room temperature

Coffee Grounds Bundle

Method:

Spray interior of coffee can thoroughly with non-stick cooking spray and set aside.

Using at least four layers of cheesecloth, cut out a section large enough to hold the
coffee grounds with enough additional space to tie the bundle at the top. Place coffee grounds in center of cheesecloth and tie together securely with kitchen string. (See photo.)

In a large bowl, sift together the flour, cocoa powder, sugar, and salt. In another
small bowl, whisk together the egg and oil. Set both bowls aside.

In a small saucepan, add the milk and bundle of coffee grounds. Warm the milk over
medium heat to reach 110°F on a candy thermometer, pressing occasionally on bundle to release the liquid and infuse the milk with coffee flavor.

Once the milk has reached 110°F, remove from heat, press all liquid from the coffee
bundle, discard coffee bundle, and stir in yeast. Add the milk mixture to the flour mixture, then add the egg mixture and stir until incorporated. You should have a moist, sticky dough at this point. (See photo.)

Flour a large, flat work surface and the exterior of the dough ball generously. Place
dough on floured surface and begin to knead the dough with floured hands, adding a small amount of flour as needed, just enough to keep the dough from being sticky. Knead dough until smooth and elastic, about 5-6 minutes. Place dough into prepared coffee tin. Cover coffee tin with a clean kitchen towel and set in a warm place for an hour to an hour and a half, or until dough has risen above rim of can. Pre-heat oven to 375°F.

Once dough has risen, place can into the center of the pre-heated oven and bake for 15-20 minutes, or until a cake tester inserted into center of dough comes out clean. Let the bread cool in the can until the can is cool enough to touch. Remove bread and cool thoroughly on a wire rack before slicing, or return to can if giving as a gift.

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Mary June Thompson has been cooking and entertaining for nearly two decades. During this time, her cooking style has expanded and evolved from typical American fare to encompass many different types of cuisines, including Italian, French, Greek, Asian, Mediterranean/North African, and Latin American. Focusing on obtaining the best available ingredients and preparing fresh, healthy dishes with bold flavor defines her cooking style, regardless of cuisine.


KWG announces winners

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (Feb. 17, 2015) – The Knoxville Writers’ Guild is excited to announce the winners of its annual writing contest.

Winners for each category are listed below:

Leslie Garrett Award for Literary Fiction
First Place: “A Family Meeting” by Phyllis Gobbell
Second Place: “The Clam” by Kirsten Rudberg
Third Place: “Choked” by Cathy Kodra

SciFi/Fantasy
First Place: “Metaphor Man – Chapter 2” by David Booker

Crime/Mystery
First Place: “Elsie” by Bob Godwin

Romance
First Place: “A Place for Lovers” by Patricia Hope

Novel Excerpt
First Place: “Maranatha Road” by Heather Bell Adams
Second Place: “Hold String and Fly” by Heather Bell Adams
Third Place: “The Hungry Years” by Connie Green

Creative Nonfiction
First Place: “Weighing Up the Risks” by Pauline Mary Curley

Libba Moore Gray Award for Poetry
First Place: “Carbon Monoxide” by Embley Veronica Noechel
Second Place: “Three Poems: ‘November 1862,’ ‘Three Men,’ and ‘An American Painting'” by John Mannone
Third Place: “Backwater Blues” by Faith Gomez

Young Writers’ Poetry Prize
First Place: “Easy Does It,” “Paper Doll” and “Space Traveler” by Jessica Moore
Second Place: “Entombed,” “Makeshift” and “To Whom It May Concern” by Elizabeth Wilson

Young Writers’ Fiction Prize
First Place: “Big Jim’s Antiques” by Abby Douglas

One Act Play
First Place: “Still Waters” by Mark McGinley

KWG congratulates the winners and expresses its thanks to all who participated. For more information about future contests and events, visit www.knoxvillewritersguild.org.


A1LabArts promotes book sharing

KNOXVILLE – A1LabArts is hosting a Little Free Library Workshop on Saturday, February 21, 2015 from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. at the Center for Creative Minds, 23 Emory Place, in Knoxville.

For $50 per box, participants can create a Little Free Library to place in their neighborhood. What is a Little Free Library? It’s a “take a book, return a book” gathering place where neighbors share their favorite literature and stories.

Participants will be provided with all of the supplies necessary to assemble a box and instructions on how to install the box in their neighborhood. Groups are encouraged to participate. Email Donna at donnamoore32@mac.com to register.

A1LabArts is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization founded in 1995 by a group of local artists. It is dedicated to multi-disciplinary and experimental exploration of contemporary art issues in all media.


KWG announces 2015 board members

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. – The Knoxville Writers’ Guild is excited to announce its 2015 Board of Directors, which will include several new faces as well as experienced board members.

Sara Keller and Kara McLain will continue to serve on the board. Keller has served since 2012 as the guild’s treasurer and will fill that office once again in 2015. McLain has been a board member and secretary since 2013 and will continue as secretary in the upcoming year. Robert Beasley, who moderates the guild’s fiction writing group based out of Maryville, will serve another year on the board. Finally, 2013-14 KWG president, Erin (Atchley) Rowland, was re-elected to the board. Rowland has been on the board since 2011.

“I feel we now have a board that is going to be absolutely dynamic in 2015. Look for a strong return of workshops and KWG presence in the Knoxville community, as well as better communication with members,” Rowland said about the 2015 board.

Newly elected board members include: Melanie Hutsell, Betty Southworth, Debra Dylan, Donna Kapa, Kelly Norrell, Doug Romig and Robert Vogel. Each of these individuals will begin their three-year term on Jan. 1, 2015.

Additional information about KWG and its members can be found at www.knoxvillewritersguild.org.


Knoxville Writers Guild invite new members

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. – Members of the Knoxville Writers’ Guild writing groups will share their works and hold a mix and mingle potluck for December’s monthly program. The event, which will be open to the public, will begin at 7 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 4, 2014 at the Laurel Theater, at the corner of Laurel Avenue and 16th Streets (in Fort Sanders).

Both current members and those simply curious about joining the guild are encouraged to attend and to bring a covered dish. A $2 donation is requested at the door. The building is handicapped accessible. Additional parking is available at Redeemer Church of Knoxville, 1642 Highland Ave.

More than 15 writing groups are currently part of the KWG, with genres including poetry, playwriting, literary fiction, crime and mystery, sci-fi/fantasy, prompt writing and creative non-fiction. The guild also features two groups specifically designed for teen writers. A representative from most groups will be available, and writers are encouraged to bring copies of their books to sell in anticipation of the holidays. Sales tables will also be provided for those KWG members not currently part of one of the groups.

The Knoxville Writers’ Guild exists to facilitate a broad and inclusive community for area writers, provide a forum for information, support and sharing among writers, help members improve and market their writing skills and promote writing and creativity.

Additional information about KWG can be found at www.KnoxvilleWritersGuild.org.