Tales and Tamales in Knoxville

KNOXVILLE, TN – The Knoxville History Project (KHP) will be hosting “Tales and Tamales at Gallows Hill,” on Thursday, October 26, 2017 at 6 p.m., at 516 West Vine Avenue. The event is a fundraiser to support the work of the Knoxville History Project which researches and promotes the history of Knoxville. Tickets are $100 each (tax-deductible contribution) can be purchased via knoxvillehistoryproject.org/events.

Event Features:

-Knoxville Halloween Stories with renowned historian Jack Neely – tales of how Knoxvillians have celebrated October 31 throughout the city’s history.

-Music from Kukuly and the Gypsy Fuego, the Django-style string-jazz combo, the likes of which probably played in the Carpenters Union ballroom during the 1940s and featuring one of the spookiest songs in Knoxville’s history, Leola Manning’s 1930 cult classic, “Satan is Busy in Knoxville.”

-Special Shadow Side Ghost Tour of Gallows Hill – the area around the north end of downtown – with historian Laura Still from Knoxville Walking Tours. Every guest will leave with a signed copy of Laura’s in-depth book “A Haunted History of Knoxville.”

-Good old tamale dinner, provided by Good Golly Tamale, who in recent years have been reviving a Knoxville tradition that “Tamale King” Harry Royston started near the Old City in 1887.

-This will be Knoxville History Project’s very first event in the historic ca. 1946 building where KHP calls home. The event will be held upstairs in the old meeting hall that once hosted both union meetings and community dances.

The Knoxville History Project (KHP) is an educational nonprofit with a mission to research and promote the history and culture of Knoxville.


Monsters at Museum is Oct 28

KNOXVILLE, TN – The East Tennessee Historical Society is hosting “Monsters in the Museum,” an event highlighting superstitions that have called East Tennessee home over the years, on October 28, 2017, from 11am to 2pm. From the wampus cat to eerie Victorian mourning traditions, museum staff will delve into the region’s history of sightings and folklore. The event will feature a variety of Halloween themed children’s games, crafts, and storytelling. Children will Trick or Treat to various stops around the East Tennessee History Center. Costume contests will take place on the hour with prizes for most creative, funniest, and scariest costume.

Museum admission is free during the Monsters at the Museum event. Exhibits currently on view include the feature exhibition, Stories in Stitches: Quilts from the East Tennessee Historical Society’s Permanent Collection, an East Tennessee Streetscape and Corner Drug Store, and Voices of the Land: The People of East Tennessee, a look at 300 years of history, from the Cherokee to the 1982 World’s Fair.

The Museum of East Tennessee is located at the East Tennessee History Center, 601 S. Gay Street, Knoxville.

For more information, call 865-215-8824 or visit www.eastTNhistory.org.


Trunk or Treat at Marble Springs

Knoxville, TN – Marble Springs is hosting Trunk or Treat on Saturday, October 28, 2017 from 5:00pm-8:00pm for some Halloween fun! Families can enjoy a bonfire and trick-or- treating at the 35 acre scenic historic property and five historic structures that will be eerily lit by candlelight. Families will also have the opportunity to have their pictures taken with Halloween decorations and beautiful fall scenery. Trunk-or- treat at Marble Springs State Historic Site is a fun and safe event for families to enjoy Halloween festivities.

For those wishing to bring your vehicle to participate in the trunk-or- treat portion of the event, please call and register. You bring your candy and participate in bringing Halloween fun to this community event. Decoration of your vehicle is encouraged, but not required. Set up for the event will take place from 4:00 till 5:00.

This event is free. Donations are appreciated and all proceeds will go towards educational programming and the continued maintenance of Marble Springs State Historic Site.

For more information call (865)573-5508 or email info@marblesprings.net or visit the website at www.marblesprings.net.

 


Author highlights new novel

KNOXVILLE, TN – Popular Appalachian author and New York Times best-seller Sharyn McCrumb will be at the East Tennessee History Center on October 10, 2017 as part of a launch tour for her new book, The Unquiet Grave. Set in 19th century West Virginia, McCrumb’s novel is based on the true story of one of the strangest murder trials in American history — the case of the Greenbrier Ghost.

McCrumb uses genealogical research and historical documents to uncover the complex characters and details behind the 1897 death of Zona Heaster in Greenbrier, West Virginia, a story well known to American folklorists. Heaster, a beautiful and willful 24 year-old, marries the town blacksmith and moves to a farm twenty miles from her family, only to die several weeks later of complications from a fall. Zona’s mother claims she was visited by the ghost of her daughter, who came to tell her that she had been murdered. The mother is determined to seek justice for her daughter. An autopsy is conducted that supports her claims and a trial follows. Through The Unquiet Grave Sharyn McCrumb brings to life the interesting characters, the defense attorney, a pro-Union bridgeburner and former slave owner; and the mother of the murdered woman, who relentlessly sticks to her ghost story—all seen through the eyes of a young black lawyer on the cusp of a new century.

The October 10 event at the East Tennessee History Center begins with a light reception at 6:30 p.m., followed by a lecture and book signing 7:00 p.m. The program is free and open to the public.

McCrumb, who was named a “Virginia Woman of History” in 2008 for Achievement in Literature, received the 2011 Perry F. Kendig Award for Achievement in Literary Arts from the Blue Ridge Arts Council of southwest Virginia. McCrumb’s many honors include: Appalachian Writers Association Book of the Year Award; the Wilma Dykeman Award for Literature given by the East Tennessee Historical Society; the Audie Award for Best Recorded Book; AWA Outstanding Contribution to Appalachian Literature Award; the Chaffin Award for Southern Literature; the Plattner Award for Short Story; and AWA’s Best Appalachian Novel. She was the first writer-in-residence at King College in Tennessee. In 2005 she was honored as the Writer of the Year at Emory & Henry College.

About the ETHS
Established in 1834, the East Tennessee Historical Society is widely acknowledged as one of the most active history organizations in the state and enjoys a national reputation for excellence in programming and education. For 183 years the East Tennessee Historical Society has been helping East Tennesseans hold on to our unique heritage—recording the events, collecting the artifacts, and saving the stories that comprise the history we all share.

About Friends of the Knox County Public Library
Friends of the Knox County Public Library is a non-profit organization whose mission is to foster a love of libraries, books and reading in the Knox County area. The organization raises funds to sponsor community outreach programs, represent the interests of Knox County library patrons, and support a variety of services offered by the local library system that would otherwise not be available due to budget or staff restrictions.

The free event is presented by the East Tennessee Historical Society and the Friends of the Knox County Public Library. The reception begins at 6:30 p.m., with the presentation at 7:00 p.m., followed by a book signing. The East Tennessee History Center is located at 601 S. Gay Street, Knoxville. Ms. McCrumb will be signing books following her lecture. For more information on the lecture, exhibitions, or museum hours, call 865-215-8824 or visit the website at www.EastTNHistory.org.


Blount Mansion plans Halloween event

KNOXVILLE, TN – Ghosts, goblins, witches, haints, and The Mysterious Past of Blount Mansion all come together for one event. Blount Mansion’s annual Halloween event will be bigger and better than ever this year with ghost stories, scary legends, history about death and dying in the 18th and 19th centuries, and tours of the Blount Mansion property.

There will be candy for the kids and some extra special fun with the other house on-site the Craighead-Jackson House, which event organizers say is one of the most haunted sites in Knoxville. There will be three tours starting at 8, 9, and 10 p.m. on Saturday October 28, 2017. On Monday October 30th and Tuesday October 31st, the tours will be at 8 and 9 p.m.

Tickets are $10 and available at BlountMansion.org.


UT’s Cronan is luncheon speaker

KNOXVILLE, TN – The Historic Homes of Knoxville are pleased to invite the public to a luncheon on Tuesday, October 3, 2017, at 11:30 AM at The Foundry to celebrate the founding of the City of Knoxville 226 years ago. Joan Cronan, Women’s Athletics Director Emeritus at the University of Tennessee Knoxville, and Dr. Bruce Wheeler, University of Tennessee Department of History Professor Emeritus, will discuss “Women Who Made a Difference”.

Knoxville’s key leaders will come together to celebrate and promote the city and its most precious properties, including Blount Mansion, Crescent Bend House & Gardens, Historic Ramsey House, James White’s Fort, Mabry-Hazen House, Marble Springs State Historic Site, and Historic Westwood. Proceeds from the luncheon will benefit the joint promotional activities of the Historic Homes.

Purchase tickets through www.knoxalliance.store or by calling 865-523-7543 by September 28.

UT’s success in both the athletic and academic realms speak volumes to Cronan’s decision-making and leadership ability, as demonstrated by appointment to the 2010 NCAA Division 1 Leadership Council and selection of her peers as the president of the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics (NACDA) in 2008-09.

Professor William Bruce Wheeler was chosen by the University’s National Alumni Association as an outstanding teacher, and he has twice been awarded the L.R. Hesler Award for service to students. From 1987 to 1994, he was the director of the University Honors Program. In 2002, he received the National Alumni Association Award for Public Service. His responsibilities in the department’s graduate program are graduate courses, seminars, theses, and doctoral dissertations in United States Early National History.

Joan Cronan, Women’s Athletics Director Emeritus at the University of Tennessee Knoxville, will be a special speaker at the luncheon on Tuesday, October 3, 2017, at 11:30 AM at The Foundry to celebrate the founding of the City of Knoxville 226 years ago. Photo submitted.

The Historic Homes of Knoxville is a partnership that shares resources and participates in joint marketing to present the history, culture, and heritage of Knoxville and East Tennessee: www.hhknoxville.org.


KJO celebrates Sarah Vaughn

KNOXVILLE, TN – The Knoxville Jazz Orchestra’s 2017-18 concert season begins on Tuesday, September 12, 2017 at 8pm with “Tribute to Sarah Vaughan Featuring Deborah Brown”. The program will be held at The Mill and Mine at 227 West Depot Avenue, in Knoxville.

Join the KJO and vocalist-extraordinaire Deborah Brown as we pay tribute to one of the most beloved artists of the 20th century, Ms. Sarah Vaughan. Dubbed “The Divine One” and “Sassy,” Vaughan’s interpretations of popular songs helped canonize what is now known as the Great American Songbook. Vocalist Deborah Brown might well be the heir-apparent to Vaughan, possessing a flawless technique, incredible range of expression, masterful sense of swing and effortless command of subtle harmony. A native of Kansas City, Deborah brings with her a wealth of experience, expertise and exciting arrangements of classic songs. A must see event for all music lovers!

The Knoxville Jazz Orchestra is a 17 piece big band comprised of professional musicians from across the region. Since its inception in 1999, the orchestra has performed dozens of concerts in East Tennessee, appeared on major jazz festivals in Europe, performed and recorded with internationally acclaimed guest artists, and released four critically acclaimed CD recordings.

Tickets for the event are $36.50 adult, $15.00 student. Tickets are available in advance at http://www.knoxjazz.org


WDVX celebrates 20 years of music

Knoxville, TN. – From its humble origins situated in a camper located in an East Tennessee campground, through to its present stature as one of America’s — make that the world’s — foremost authoritative voices for authentic Americana, WDVX has established an enviable niche in the realms of roots music and other indigenous forms of folk, rock, blues and country. Lauded by listeners and artists alike, many of whom received their initial exposure on the station’s airwaves, WDVX has become a true bastion of Americana music in all its many forms.

To commemorate that remarkable legacy, the station will present the WDVX 20 Year Celebration on November 17, 2017 beginning at 7:30 p.m. at the historic Bijou Theatre in downtown Knoxville. In addition, the concert will also be broadcast live on WDVX.

Co-produced by Senior Creative Consultant and On-Air Personality Tony Lawson and WDVX Program Director Katie Cauthen, the festivities will feature an impressive array of artists spanning all realms of the Americana spectrum, including a number of special guests to be announced later. Each portion of the live variety show will be introduced by a WDVX personality, along with a special set focusing specifically on East Tennessee artists, hosted and curated by Cruz Contreras and Sam Quinn, from Knoxville’s own nationally-known band The Black Lillies. In addition, two-time IBMA award winner Phil Leadbetter has gathered many of the leading lights of the Bluegrass world for a special performance that promises to be one of many remarkable offerings showcased throughout the evening.

Tickets go on sale to the general public on September 8 through all TicketMaster locations, by phone at 800-745-3000 and online at KnoxBijou.com. In addition, a limited number of tickets will be offered in advance at the free WDVX “Cheers to 20 Years” concert taking place in Knoxville’s Market Square on Friday, September 1.

East Tennessee’s Own WDVX is a listener supported public broadcaster heard locally on 89.9, 102.9, and 93.9 and streaming on WDVX.com. WDVX is a service of Cumberland Communities Communications Corporation, a 501c3 organization.


Johnson Architecture wins award

The Masonry Institute of Tennessee recently awarded Johnson Architecture the 2017 Merit Award in Masonry for the firm’s design of renovations at Maryville College’s iconic Anderson Hall. Johnson Architecture, Joseph Construction Company and masonry partner, F.L. Lay Masonry Contractors in Knoxville, worked collaboratively to ensure that the masonry design maintained the integrity of the historic brick building that has long been recognized as an anchor of the campus.

“We knew from historical records that the original brick was fired on campus in the late 1800s,” said Daryl Johnson, founder and president of Johnson Architecture. “Our challenge was to preserve the history of those bricks while repairing and replacing the damaged pieces while creating a state- of-the- art educational environment.”

The firm’s design of Anderson Hall at Maryville College protected historical features, such as wide staircases, arched entryways and high ceilings, while updating other amenities, including adding an elevator, security system, flexible classroom designs and 30 faculty offices. Photo submitted.

“As we designed each new amenity, we ensured that the original construction of the building was acknowledged,” Johnson said. “We framed a small section of the interior wall to expose brick, allowing visitors to see the original construction.”

Since Anderson Hall’s reopening in 2015, Johnson Architecture has earned several accolades for the project, including the Blount County Historic Trust Design Award in 2015 and both the Knox Heritage East Tennessee Preservation Award and East Tennessee Historical Society Award of Distinction in 2016.


Marble Springs hosts Soiree

Marble Springs Historic Site is hosting the annual Sevier Soiree on Friday, September 15th from 6:30-8:30pm. This event is a celebration of the rich history and scenic beauty of the historic farmstead of John Sevier with music and a Southern inspired dinner prepared by Bradford Catered Events. Guests also will enjoy touring the scenic 35 acre property, 5 historic structures, and a silent auction.

Marble Springs State Historic Site is the only historic site charged with interpreting the life and times of the first governor of Tennessee, John Sevier. Marble Springs is operated and maintained by a non-profit organization, the Governor John Sevier Memorial Association. This fundraiser will help the site’s mission of education and preservation of the historic farmstead, ensure quality school tours and educational programs, and assist in the continued maintenance of our arboretum and hiking trails. Marble Springs is funded under an agreement with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Tennessee Historical Commission, and supplemented by additional funds raised by the Governor John Sevier Memorial Association.

Tickets are $50 per person and must be purchased by Sept. 2. Guests may purchase online from the Marble Springs website at www.marblesprings.net. A portion of your ticket price is tax deductible.

 


ETHS presents students’ documentaries

(Knoxville, TN) East Tennessee History Day this year will include an ETHS Brown Bag Lecture with documentaries by student winners at noon, Wednesday, August 9, 2017.

The National History Day (NHD) competition is an annual contest for middle and high school students. Each year middle and high school students advance from school, district, and state levels to compete in the national finals at College Park, Maryland. East Tennessee students have proven amazingly competitive. This program will feature video documentaries by East Tennessee students who have won first place or scored high in nationals.

It is especially significant that these entries are based on local stories: a family farm lost to a TVA Dam, a 1929 strike by women workers at a rayon plant in Elizabethton, and the story of a minister/physician who left a lucrative career to establish a mission in the mountains of Sevier County, where his many baby deliveries included the little girl who grew up to become Dolly Parton. Some 500,000 students participate nationally. ETHS is the coordinator for the East Tennessee Region, an affiliate of the national contest.

The program is sponsored by the Gentry Griffey Funeral Chapel & Crematory and is free and open to the public. The lecture will begin at noon at the East Tennessee History Center, 601 S. Gay Street, Knoxville. Guests are invited to bring a “Brown Bag” lunch and enjoy the lecture. Soft drinks will be available.

For more information on the lecture, exhibitions, or museum hours, call 865-215-8824 or visit the website at www.EastTNHistory.org.


History comes alive in Knoxville

Knoxville’s 10th Annual East Tennessee History Fair is scheduled for 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., Saturday, August 19, 2017. This event will celebrate the region’s history with reenactments, activities, and tours.

Presented by the East Tennessee Historical Society, along with dozens of businesses, historical organizations, museums, musicians, and individuals from across the region, the East Tennessee History Fair features fun and educational activities highlighting the people, places, stories, and events that comprise the shared history of our 35-county region. The event is free and open to the public.

Special highlights include:

–Free admission to the Museum of East Tennessee History for the day, including Voices of the Land: The People of East Tennessee and Stories in Stitches exhibitions, plus the Streetscape with Streetcar 409 and Corner Drug Store, c. 1920-1930

–Antiques Fair—downtown Knoxville’s only antiques fair with vendors selling a wide variety of primitives, antiques, and tabletop items, sponsored by Case Antiques and Building Systems Technology, Inc.

–WDVX Music Stage featuring Russ and Becky Jeffers, Travelin’ Caudells, Good Thymes Ceilidh Band, Knox County Jug Stompers, Early Morning Stringdusters, and Seven Pine

–Living History Timeline—spanning the region’s history from the Cherokee to Vietnam War

–Abraham Lincoln and wife Mary Todd, Mary Anna Custis Lee and Robert E. Lee, and many other historical characters will roam the crowd

–More than fifty historical and genealogical societies representing county, regional, and state organizations from across the region

–“Old Fashioned Tennessee Checkers Skirmish” sponsored by Mast General Store

–Book sales by Friends of the Knox County Library featuring Civil War, WWII, and other local and American history-themed books for children and adults

–“History Hound” Dog Costume Contest—guests are invited to bring their pets to Krutch Park dressed as their favorite historical character. Registration begins at 9:30 a.m. and the contest begins at 10:15. Celebrity judges will award fabulous prizes from PetSafe for “Best Costume” and “Most East Tennessee Spirit.”

–Tours of Underground Gay Street
–Walking tour with Jack Neely on the history of the Worlds Fair Park
–Walking tour with Knoxville Walking Tours on “Spies, Spooks, and Scoundrels”
–Craft demonstrations–spinning, quilting, blacksmithing, tinsmithing, raku pottery, woodworking, chair caning, basket making, natural fibers, clay work, lye soap making, primitive handmade items, and more
–Art Market Gallery will be celebrating being a part of Knoxville’s history for 35 years. They will feature a special exhibition of works by gallery members entitled Original Art of East Tennessee’s Spaces and Places, and give out Cherry Coke
–An enlarged children’s activity area with special crafts, games, and storytelling by the “King of The Wild Frontier,” Davy Crockett, along with a birthday party with cake for Davy’s 231st birthday
–Jump on the Big Love Bus for tours of downtown’s historic homes, including Blount Mansion, James White’s Fort, Mabry Hazen House, and Bethel Cemetery
–Market Square Farmers Market
–Home style food, goodies, cool treats, kettle corn and barbeque
–Vintage films by the Tennessee Archive of Moving Image and Sound at the Tennessee Theatre—Open House with free tours of the Tennessee Theatre

Attendees of the East Tennessee History Fair often have a chance to chat with historical characters and reinactors who also have a love for history. Photo by Celebrate Knoxville.

For more information on the History Fair, please visit www.easttnhistory.org/eastTNhistoryfair or call 865-215-8824.


Quilts on display at ETHC

Knoxville, Tenn. – From histories handed down to mysteries that remain, the new feature exhibition at the Museum of East Tennessee History provides visitors the opportunity to learn the “stories in stitches” from the quilts that have been entrusted to the East Tennessee Historical Society.

Stories in Stitches features more than two dozen quilts with dates ranging from c. 1820 to 2001. The exhibition will be on display in the Rogers-Claussen Feature Gallery of the East Tennessee History Center from August 7, 2017 – January 2, 2018. Stories in Stitches is dedicated to Linda Claussen and Ginny Rogers for their years of service and support of the East Tennessee Historical Society’s quilt collection.

The exhibition highlights more than two dozen quilts in a variety of fabrics, and patterns, and highlights some of the families who have made and cherished them. Patterns include everything from Rose of Sharon and “Knoxville Crazy Quilt” to a Civil War memory quilt and one pieced together out of clothing labels. The quilters range from John Sevier’s wife Bonny Kate to the Smoky Mountain Quilters of Tennessee.

The Museum of East Tennessee History is open 9:00 am to 4:00 pm, Monday through Friday; 10:00 am to 4:00 pm, Saturday; and 1:00 pm to 5:00 pm, Sunday. Museum Admission is $5.00 for adults, $4.00 for seniors, and FREE for children under 16. Each Sunday admission is FREE to all and ETHS members always receive FREE admission. The Museum is located in the East Tennessee History Center, 601 South Gay Street, Knoxville, TN 37901.

For more information about booking the exhibition, scheduling a school tour, or visiting the museum, call (865) 215-8824, email eths@eastTNhistory.org, or visit www.easttnhistory.org.

“Rising from the Rubble,” 2001. Made and gifted by Joan McGinnis of Knox County, in memory of those who died in 9/11 attacks and all veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Photo submitted.


History Hound contest at Fair

Have a blast with the past at the East Tennessee History Fair! The “History Hound” Dog Costume Contest is just one of the many activities to enjoy at the 10th Annual East Tennessee History Fair being held on Saturday, August 19, 2017.

Local celebrities will be judging for “Most East Tennessee Spirit” and “Best Historic Costume.” Registration begins at 9:30 a.m. in Krutch Park in downtown Knoxville. The contest begins at 10:15 a.m. Some costume suggestions include a coal miner, Civil War soldier, Abe Lincoln, moonshiner, Davy Crockett, or a pioneer dog.

The event is free to the public to attend and participate, with prizes provided by PetSafe.

The East Tennessee History Center is located at 601 S. Gay Street in downtown Knoxville.

Clementine, dressed as Dolly Parton, poses for judges at the 2015 History Hound contest where she claimed the title of Most East Tennessee Spirit. Photo submitted.


Knoxville High School tour offered

Knoxville, Tenn. – On Friday, July 28, 2017 Knox Heritage is hosting a behind the scenes tour of the renovations to the Knoxville High School building located at 101 E 5th Avenue in Knoxville. The event will be held from 5:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m.. Developer, Rick Dover, will be on hand to talk about the future of the site. Reservations are required. Refreshments will be served. Street parking is available.

The iconic Neoclassical Revival building dating back to 1910 operated as a high school until 1951 and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1994. During the school’s 40-year history, it was best known as an athletic powerhouse, earning 13 Tennessee state championships in football, as well as national championships in 1930 and 1937.

Quite a few notable Knoxvillians are graduates of Knoxville High School including Pulitzer Prize-winning author James Agee, opera singer and the voice of Walt Disney’s Sleeping Beauty, Mary Costa, award-winning actress, Patricia Neal and industrialist and philanthropist, Guilford Glazer.

To reserve a spot, email RSVP@knoxheritage.org or call (865) 523-8008.

New members can join at the door for a one time only $20 household membership.

Knox Heritage hosts Behind the Scenes Tours for its members each spring and fall and they’re FREE with an annual membership. Members help save historic places across East Tennessee while enjoying the many other benefits of being a part of an exciting and engaged community.


Mabry Hazen hosts culinary feast

KNOXVILLE, TN – On Saturday, August 5, 2017, the Mabry-Hazen House will cordially invite twenty guests into the historic home for an evening of eating, drinking, and learning. Partnering with Heartfire Culinary and Craft Accommodations, the Mabry-Hazen House will exhibit the tastes, ingredients, and culinary history of 1920s America. The dinner will immerse guests in the period as each course and beverage was inspired by culinary experiences typical of the 1920s.

Guests will dine in the historic dining room and parlor and enjoy a seven-course dinner prepared local chefs Amber Lloyd (former executive chef at The Orangery, RT Lodge, and Bistro by the Tracks) and Chris Cantrell of Heartfire Culinary as well as cocktails and non-alcoholic beverages mixed by mixologist Palmer Mason of Craft Accommodations. Before the dinner, Patrick Hollis of the Mabry-Hazen House will guide diners through the fascinating and nuanced culinary histories of the Hazens, Knoxvillians, and Americans during the “Roaring” Twenties.

Tickets are $180 per person. All proceeds benefit the Hazen Historical Museum Foundation. Tickets may be purchased in advance by visiting www.mabryhazen.com or call 865-522-8661 for more information. Event takes place rain or shine. Seating is limited and tickets are non-refundable.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Built in 1858, Mabry-Hazen House is strategically located on the highest hill east of downtown Knoxville with spacious views in all directions. The home was occupied and defended by both armies during the Civil War. It housed three generations of the same family for 130 years, and the museum showcases one of the largest original family collections in America. Your attendance will help support the museum’s mission to preserve and educate the public about an important part of East Tennessee history.

Please call 865-522- 8661 or visit www.mabryhazen.com for more information.


Forensic science topic of lecture

(Knoxville, TN) In a Brown Bag Lecture on Wednesday, July 12, 2017, Arthur Bohanan will discuss his new book, Prints of a Man, detailing his career of 55 years in the criminal justice field. A curious mind and a high school interest in fingerprints took him from Sevier County, Tennessee to the top of his profession as a forensics specialist, inventor, and crime solver with awards and honors too numerous to list.

Bohanan is perhaps best known for his invention of a method to take fingerprints from a dead body and for his work to identify bodies from the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center. His pioneering work included the discovery of the chemical composition of children’s fingerprints and their change at puberty from a water base to an oil base, a key factor when working with the AMBER Alert system and missing children. Bohanan will also discuss his latest fascinating research to discover the rate of decay, cemeteries washed out by floods and hurricanes, and to locate and gender the long dead, in which he reports a 99 percent accuracy on blind testing.

The program is sponsored by the Gentry Griffey Funeral Chapel and Crematory and is free and open to the public. The lecture will begin at noon at the East Tennessee History Center, 601 S. Gay Street, Knoxville. Guests are invited to bring a “Brown Bag” lunch and enjoy the lecture. Soft drinks will be available.

For more information on the lecture, exhibitions, or museum hours, call 865-215-8824 or visit the website at www.EastTNHistory.org.


Blues society raffles custom guitar

Knoxville, TN – Smoky Mountain Blues Society, a 501 (c) (3) non profit organization, is giving everyone an equal opportunity to win a custom built signature guitar from Rigney Custom Guitars, an instrument that is not only one of a kind, but one which also bears the signatures of an amazing array of iconic Blues artists — Bonnie Raitt, Buddy Guy, Delbert McClinton, Derek Trucks, and Susan Tedeschi, among them.

The guitar will be raffled off from July 1-September 30, 2017 with the drawing scheduled to take place on October 15 aboard the Star of Knoxville during the Smoky Mountain Blues Society’s monthly Blues Cruise. Raffle tickets cost $20 each with a maximum of 500 tickets offered for sale.

Proceeds from the raffle will benefit Blues in the Schools, one of the fundamental outreach programs provided by the Smoky Mountain Blues Society. The program, which was initiated in 1995, is offered free to schools and other youth-oriented organizations for the sole purpose of exposing young people to Blues music and to educate them about the importance Blues music plays in the overall umbrella of traditional American music. In 2016, the program reached over 1,400 children in East Tennessee, students ranging in age from Elementary School to High School.

Artists who have signed the Smoky Mountain Signature Guitar to date: Ronnie Baker Brooks, Buddy Guy, Nick Moss, Carlos Johnson, Mike Ledbetter, Susan Tedeschi, Coco Montoya, Corey Dennison, Derek Trucks, Delbert McClinton, Bonnie Raitt, Ori Naftaly, Jellybean Johnson, Pat Travers, Jerry Hunt, Maurice John Vaughn, Mac Arnold, and Tinsley Ellis.

Tickets, complete list of the Raffle rules, and a calendar of events are available at the Smoky Mountain Blues Society website: smokymountainblues.org.


Celebrate July 4th at Mabry-Hazen

Mabry-Hazen House will host its second annual Fourth of July Celebration on Tuesday, July 4th, 2017. On historic Mabry’s Hill attendees will enjoy a great view of the July 4th fireworks show, good food, and live music by Eli Fox. Tours of the historic home will begin at 6 pm, and dinner will be served at 7:30. Alcohol is BYOB.

Mabry-Hazen House offers food and entertainment without the traffic. Tickets are $60 per adult and children under 12 are free when accompanied by a ticket holder. Tickets are limited to 200 adults to ensure a quality event. Purchase your tickets in advance to guarantee your attendance. There is plenty of parking and the site offers easy access to I-40 without traffic concerns. Tickets may be purchased in advance by visiting www.mabryhazen.com or call 865-522-8661 for more information. The event will take place rain or shine. Tickets are non-refundable. Sponsored by WDVX, All Occasions Party Rentals, and Crowne Plaza Knoxville.

Built in 1858, Mabry-Hazen House is strategically located on the highest hill east of downtown Knoxville with spacious views in all directions. The home was occupied and defended by both armies during the Civil War. It housed three generations of the same family for 130 years, and the museum showcases one of the largest original family collections in America. Your attendance will help support the museum’s mission to preserve and educate the public about an important part of East Tennessee history.

Please call 865-522-8661 or visit www.mabryhazen.com for more information.


Museum of Appalachia hosts event

The Museum of Appalachia will once again celebrate Independence Day with an old fashioned “anvil shoot.” Every 4th of July, the Museum uses gunpowder to launch a 200-pound anvil hundreds of feet into the air. The anvil shoot is the centerpiece of a celebration that includes a bell-ringing ceremony, flag procession, old-fashioned games, music, and demonstrations from blacksmiths, beekeepers, patriotic re-enactors, and woodworkers. The Museum is also hosting a pie-baking contest; registration information and other details can be found at www.museumofappalachia.org.

“When the gunpowder ignites and the anvil soars into the air, the earth will literally shake,” says Museum President, Elaine Meyer. “The sound of the explosion can be heard for several miles.”

Anvil shoots were once a common way for pioneers to commemorate holidays, elections, and other special occasions. While the tradition of anvil-shooting is nearly obsolete, the Museum keeps a piece of history alive for a 21st century audience. Photo courtesy Museum of Appalachia.

July 4th anvil shoots are a nearly 30-year tradition for the Museum, but the event remains as exciting as ever. Garden & Gun magazine named the event the “Editors’ Choice” for “Goings-on in the South” in their June/July issue.

Anvil shoots are scheduled for 10:00 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 1:00 p.m., and 2:30 p.m.

The Museum is open from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., with special Independence Day activities from 10:00 a.m. until 3:00 p.m.

On this day, only, the Museum is offering a special family rate of $35. The event is free for Museum members. Tickets may be purchased at the Museum on the day of the event. For more information, visit the Museum’s website, or call 865-494-7680.


Mabry-Hazen celebrates July 4th

Mabry-Hazen House will host its second annual Fourth of July Celebration on Tuesday, July 4, 2017. On historic Mabry’s Hill attendees will enjoy a great view of the July 4th fireworks show, good food, and live music by Eli Fox. Tours of the historic home will begin at 6pm, and dinner will be served at 7:30. Alcohol is BYOB.

Mabry-Hazen House offers food and entertainment without the traffic. Tickets are $60 per adult and children under 12 are free when accompanied by a ticket holder. Tickets are limited to 200 adults to ensure a quality event. Purchase your tickets in advance to guarantee your attendance. There is plenty of parking and the site offers easy access to I-40 without traffic concerns. Tickets may be purchased in advance by visiting www.mabryhazen.com or call 865-522-8661 for more information. The event will take place rain or shine. Tickets are non-refundable. Sponsored by WDVX, All Occasions Party Rentals, and Crowne Plaza Knoxville.

Built in 1858, Mabry-Hazen House is strategically located on the highest hill east of downtown Knoxville with spacious views in all directions. The home was occupied and defended by both armies during the Civil War. It housed three generations of the same family for 130 years, and the museum showcases one of the largest original family collections in America. Your attendance will help support the museum’s mission to preserve and educate the public about an important part of East Tennessee history.

Please call 865-522-8661 or visit www.mabryhazen.com for more information.


Knox Heritage names Fragile 15

The French Broad River corridor is among Knox Heritage’s recently announced 2017 list of the most endangered historic buildings and places in Knoxville and Knox County. The announcement took place at Knoxville High School, 101 E. Fifth Avenue.

Every May during National Preservation Month, Knox Heritage releases its list of the most endangered historic buildings and places in Knox County to inform the public and local leaders about the plight of significant historic resources. Often, the endangered buildings and places are representative of issues that endanger other centerpieces of our heritage across the community.

The historic places included on the list are selected by the Knox Heritage Board of Directors from nominations received from members of Knox Heritage and the general public. The list provides a work plan for the organization over the next 12 months. Preservation strategies are developed for each site on the list and can include working with current property owners, government officials, citizens and/or potential new owners to preserve these important parts of Knox County’s heritage. Knox Heritage is committed to acting as an advocate for the endangered properties. The community is invited to join in efforts to save endangered heritage through advocacy and action. To volunteer, please contact Knox Heritage at 523-8008 or info@knoxheritage.org.
2017 Fragile Fifteen

1. Standard Knitting Mill – 1400 Washington Avenue

2. Estabrook Hall – 1012 Estabrook Road

3. Knoxville College Historic District – 901 Knoxville College Drive

Representative Properties:

a. McKee Hall

b. Wallace Hall

c. Elnathan Hall

d. McMillan Chapel

e. Giffen Memorial Gymnasium

f. President’s House

4. Fort Sanders House & Grocery – 307 18th Street, 1802, 1804, & 1810 Highland Ave

5. Rule High School – 1901 Vermont Avenue

6. Sanitary Laundry – 625 N. Broadway

7. First Friends Church – 2100 Washington Avenue

8. The Eugenia Williams House – 4848 Lyons View Pike

9. Burlington Commercial District

10. Lucky Inn – 4625 Asheville Highway

11. The Sterchi Mansion/Stratford – 809 Dry Gap Pike

12. The Paul Howard House – 2921 N. Broadway

13. The Knaffl-Stephens House – 3738 Speedway Circle

14. Greyhound Bus Station – 100 E. Magnolia Avenue

15. French Broad River Corridor (pictured below)

Visit KnoxHeritage.org.


Gilded Age on display

KNOXVILLE—The McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, opens the new exhibition “Fish Forks and Fine Furnishings: Consumer Culture in the Gilded Age,” on May 26, 2017.

The American Gilded Age, defined in the exhibition as 1870-1900, saw rapid growth in mass manufacturing, trade and travel—all of which gave Americans greater access to, and interest in, goods from around the world.

From fish forks and fashionable dress to furniture and fine china, the exhibition explores the personal and household objects that served as visible symbols of wealth, power and social class. The 100-plus objects in the exhibit point to the great changes that were occurring in America at the time, and also to our continuing preoccupation with the objects we choose to buy, wear and display. Image: Three-piece Afternoon Dress, c. 1880s, American, maker unknown. Cotton, velvet, silk. Gift of G.P. Gaut, 1947. Photo courtesy McClung Museum.

“The period’s fixation on wearing the right dress or setting an elegant table is no different than today’s focus on having the right style for one’s home or consuming the right foods or status bag as dictated by Pinterest, celebrities or the thousands of lifestyle gurus that all seem to have blogs and personal brands,” said Catherine Shteynberg, museum assistant director. Shteynberg curated the exhibit with curatorial assistant Melinda Narro.

The exhibit will include an installation of Knoxville native Frederick Bonham’s parlor in the Plaza Hotel in New York City, period dress and accessories, an array of unusual serving utensils and a formal dining table arrangement, and imported goods from across the world. Objects were collected by area families and come from the McClung Museum’s permanent collections, the UT Special Collections Library and the Museum of East Tennessee History.

The McClung Museum is located at 1327 Circle Park Drive. Museum admission is free, and the museum’s hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to Saturday and 1 to 5 p.m. on Sundays. Groups may schedule tours by calling 865-974-2144 or emailing museum@utk.edu.

Free two-hour museum parking passes are available from the parking information booth at the entrance to Circle Park Drive on weekdays by request. Free parking is available on Circle Park Drive on a first-come, first-served basis on weekends. Free public transportation to the museum is also available via the Knoxville Trolley Vol Line.

For more information about the McClung Museum and its collections and exhibits, visit mcclungmuseum.utk.edu.


Historic sites celebrate Statehood Day

Knoxville, TN – June 1, 2017 marks the 221st anniversary of Tennessee’s admission as the 16th state in the union. East Tennessee’s most important cultural heritage sites are partnering to celebrate Statehood Day on Saturdays, May 27 and June 3, and Sundays, May 21 and May 28. The sites include places of historical significance in the exciting journey from the creation of our country to the founding of our state. The Historic Homes of Knoxville include: Blount Mansion, Crescent Bend, James White’s Fort, Mabry-Hazen House, Marble Springs, Ramsey House, and Historic Westwood. Each site will have individual ways of celebrating the birth of Tennessee. These are free museum days to the public.

Westwood (Sunday, May 21, 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM)
Built as a “wedding promise” in 1890 by John Edwin Lutz and his wife, Ann Adelia Armstrong Lutz, on property owned by her grandfather, Drury P. Armstrong. The highlight and most significant component of Westwood is the studio which was designed by Ann Adelia Armstrong Lutz, an accomplished artist. Today Historic Westwood is home to Knox Heritage and the East Tennessee Preservation Alliance. The home will be open for free tours. Parking available at Laurel Church of Christ. Address: 3425 Kingston Pike, Knoxville, TN 37919. Information: 865-523-8008, www.historicwestwood.org

Blount Mansion (Saturday, May 27, 10:00 AM – 2:00 PM)
Construction on Blount Mansion began in 1792. The restored mansion was open for tours in 1930, making it the oldest museum in Knox County. Commemorate the creation of the state of Tennessee and celebrate the pioneers who settled and transformed the southwest territory into the vibrant state of Tennessee. Hosting free admission. Address: 200 W. Hill Avenue, Knoxville, TN 37902. Information: 865-525-2375, www.blountmansion.org

James White’s Fort (Saturday, May 27, 10:00 AM – 3:00 PM)
Built in 1786, James White’s Fort was home to the founder of Knoxville. More than 10,000 visitors tour the Fort each year and experience the frontier lifestyle through hands-on interpretations. Tennesseans for Living History volunteers will be demonstrating the lifestyle of 1796: open hearth and fire pit cooking, weaving, spinning, and other pioneer era tasks. Free admission; donations gratefully accepted. Address: 205 E. Hill Ave, Knoxville, TN 37915. Information: 865-525-6514, www.jameswhitefort.org

Mabry-Hazen House (Saturday, May 27, 10:00 AM – 3:00 PM)
Built in 1858 and housing three generations of the same family from 1858-1987, the Mabry-Hazen House served as headquarters for both Union and Confederate forces during the Civil War. The Civil War, a gunfight on Gay Street in 1882, and a Breach of Promise lawsuit in the early 1930’s are only a few stories that bring life and color to a visit to the museum. Hosting free admission with living historians. Donations are appreciated. Address: 1711 Dandridge Avenue, Knoxville, TN, 37915. Information: 865-522-8661, www.mabryhazen.com

Marble Springs (Saturday, May 27, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM and Sunday, May 28, 11:00 – 4:00 PM)
Marble Springs was the home of John Sevier (1745-1815), Tennessee’s first governor and Revolutionary War hero. Marble Springs State Historic Site will commemorate Statehood Day with a living history weekend. Visitors are invited to experience 18th century demonstrations such as wood carving, spinning, and weaving; 18th century style militia drills; weapons demonstrations that will showcase period appropriate firearms; and much more. Details are subject to change. Free admission; donations gratefully accepted. Address: 1220 West Gov. John Sevier Highway, Knoxville, TN 37920. Information: 865-573-5508, www.marblesprings.net

Crescent Bend House & Gardens (Saturday, June 3, 9:00 AM – 1:00 PM)
Crescent Bend House & Gardens is one of the Southeast’s finest house museums and gardens. Built in 1834 by Drury Paine Armstrong, Crescent Bend was once a 900-acre working farm and so named for its prominent setting overlooking a majestic crescent bend in the Tennessee River just west of downtown Knoxville. Hosting free admission. Address: 2728 Kingston Pike Knoxville, TN 37919. Information: 865-637-3163, www.crescentbend.com

Ramsey House (Saturday, June 3, 12:00 PM – 3:00PM)
Ramsey House was built in 1797 by Knoxville’s first builder, Thomas Hope for Francis Alexander Ramsey, one of Knoxville’s first settlers. Celebrate Statehood Days with one of the founding Families of Knoxville. Ramsey House will host free tours until 3:00 PM, and visitors are invited to stay and enjoy a lively game of vintage baseball until 4:00 PM. Address: 2614 Thorngrove Pike, Knoxville, TN 37914. Information: 865-546-0745, www.ramseyhouse.org

In addition to the Historic Homes of Knoxville, Sequoyah Birthplace Museum (Vonore) and Crockett Tavern Museum (Morristown) will also host Statehood Day events on June 3.

Crockett Tavern Museum (Saturday, June 3, 11:00 AM – 5:00 PM)
The Museum was built on the site of the boyhood home of Davy Crockett. It is a reconstruction of the 1790’s John Crockett Tavern. Open with free admission. Address: 2002 Morningside Drive, Morristown, TN 37814. Information: 423-587-9900, www.crocketttavernmuseum.org

Sequoyah Birthplace Museum (Saturday, June 3, 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM)
The mission of the Sequoyah Birthplace Museum, a property of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, is to promote the understanding and appreciation of the history and culture of the Cherokee Indians in Eastern Tennessee, particularly the life and contributions of Sequoyah. The Museum will collect, preserve, interpret, and exhibit objects and data that support this mission. Free admission. Demonstrators will include corn husk dolls and other activities with living historians. Address: 576 HWY 360, Vonore, TN 37885. Information: 423-884-6246, www.sequoyahmuseum.org

About the Historic Homes of Knoxville
The Historic House Museums of Knoxville is a partnership that shares resources from each historic site in presenting the history, culture, and heritage of Knoxville and East Tennessee: www.hhknoxville.org


Knox Heritage releases endangered list

KNOXVILLE, TENN. – Knox Heritage will announce its 2017 list of the most endangered historic buildings and places in Knoxville and Knox County on Monday, May 15, 2017 at 11:00 a.m. The announcement will take place at Knoxville High School, 101 E. Fifth Avenue. The former Knoxville High School was itself on the Fragile 15 list from 2010 until 2013 and is currently being restored.

Every May during National Preservation Month, Knox Heritage releases its list of the most endangered historic buildings and places in Knox County to inform the public and local leaders about the plight of significant historic resources. Often, the endangered buildings and places are representative of issues that endanger other centerpieces of our heritage across the community.

The historic places included on the list are selected by the Knox Heritage Board of Directors from nominations received from members of Knox Heritage and the general public. The list provides a work plan for the organization over the next 12 months. Preservation strategies are developed for each site on the list and can include working with current property owners, government officials, citizens and/or potential new owners to preserve these important parts of Knox County’s heritage.

Knox Heritage is committed to acting as an advocate for the endangered properties we identify each year. We invite the community to join us in our efforts to save our endangered heritage through advocacy and action. Knox Heritage preserves, restores and transforms historic places. For everyone. Forever. The nonprofit organization was founded in 1974 and now serves the entire 16-county Knoxville region.

For more information visit www.knoxheritage.org.


Family Fun Day at McClung Museum

KNOXVILLE—The McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, will host a free family fun day on Saturday, May 6, 2017, from 1 to 4 p.m.

The “Day of Clay” on May 6 will highlight the museum’s collection of ceramics by featuring clay objects from different cultures and time periods. Visitors will have the opportunity to work with clay and bring home their own work of art.

All materials will be provided and reservations are not necessary.

The McClung Museum is at 1327 Circle Park Drive. Museum admission is free, and the museum’s hours are 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Monday to Saturday and 1–5 p.m. Sundays. Free two-hour museum parking passes are available from the parking kiosk at the entrance to Circle Park Drive during the week. Free parking is available on the weekends. Free public transportation to the museum is available via the Knoxville Trolley Vol Line.


Sheep Shearing Day at Museum

NORRIS, Tenn. –This Friday, from 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m., the Museum will host its second and final Sheep Shearing Day of the year. Students and families are invited to join the Museum as they welcome the warmth of spring by trimming the winter’s heavy growth of wool from their flock of sheep.

Last Friday, more than 1,000 students, parents, and teachers visited the Museum to celebrate a pioneer tradition.

Museum President, Elaine Meyer, said that this is the first year that the Museum is hosting two Sheep Shearing Days. Meyer said, “adding a second Sheep Shearing Day affords us the opportunity to share Appalachian history and culture with an even greater number of young people than ever before.”

The event will feature demonstrations of shearing, carding, spinning, weaving, and other ways that pioneers turned fleece into woven goods. Guests will also enjoy sheep herding, Appalachian music, an animal meet & greet, storytelling, and several historic demonstrations, including soap carving, beekeeping, sawmilling, blacksmithing, pioneer gardening, and dulcimer lessons.

Admission includes a tour of the Museum mountain farm and village, which contains some three-dozen historic log structures, exhibit halls filled with thousands of Appalachian artifacts, gardens, and free-range farm animals. For rates, go here: http://www.museumofappalachia.org/information/plan-your-visit/hours-and-admission.

School groups, homeschools, families, and individuals are all welcome to attend. Special student and group rates are available, and the event is free for Museum members. Groups of 20 or more, please call 865-494-7680 to make a reservation.

The Museum is located 16 miles north of Knoxville, one mile east of I-75, at Exit 122.

Visit MuseumofAppalachia.org.


Museum wins TAM President’s Award

The Museum of East Tennessee History was recently selected to receive the 2017 President’s Award, the highest project-based recognition presented by the Tennessee Association of Museums (TAM), for the Come to Make Records: Knoxville’s Contribution to American Popular Music exhibition.

This exhibit also won TAM Awards of Excellence in the categories of best temporary exhibition and audiovisual component for the introductory film produced by East Tennessee PBS. The President’s Award recipient is chosen from the top five scoring awards and the winner determined by the votes of the past presidents. The awards were presented at the recent Tennessee Association of Museums Conference held in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee.

Come to Make Records was organized by the East Tennessee Historical Society in partnership with the Knox County Public Library and the Tennessee Archive of Moving Image and Sound, a division of the Calvin M. McClung Historical Collection, as a temporary exhibition at the Museum of East Tennessee History and was on display April through October, 2016.

Visit www.eastTNhistory.org.


ETHS hosts annual meeting

(Knoxville, Tenn.) The East Tennessee Historical Society will hold their annual meeting on Tuesday, May 2, at the Foundry on World’s Fair Park. Both members and the general public are invited to attend. The event begins with a reception at 5:30 p.m. and will be followed by the dinner, lecture, and awards presentations which begin at 6:30 p.m.

Keynote speaker Secretary of State Tre Hargett, the chief executive officer of the Tennessee Department of State, which includes the Library and Archives, will address how the Tennessee State Library and Archives (TSLA) houses the collective memory of Tennesseans. In its vast collections are millions of precious documents, including photographs and maps and the state’s constitutions. The Library and Archives preserves these and other irreplaceable state records, as well as family treasures, and provides training, support, and financial assistance to public libraries and county archives throughout Tennessee.

A native of Ripley, Tennessee, Secretary Hargett now lives in Hendersonville with his wife and two sons. He is a strong proponent for Tennessee History Day, a state affiliate of the National History Day competition, for which ETHS is the East Tennessee District coordinator.

The occasion will also feature the presentation of Awards of Excellence to organizations and individuals for special projects to preserve and promote the region’s history. These include the Teaching Excellence Award, History in the Media, Community History Award, Award of Distinction, and the Ramsey Award for Lifetime Achievement. Established in 1834, the East Tennessee Historical Society is widely acknowledged to be one of the most active history organizations in the state and enjoys a national reputation for excellence in programming and education.

The event will be held at the Foundry on World’s Fair Park, 747 World’s Fair Park Drive, Knoxville, and is open to the public. Tickets are $40 per person and include both the lecture and dinner. Reservations are requested by April 27. To make reservations or for additional information call 865-215-8883 or visit www.eastTNhistory.org.


Museum celebrates TN Marble

In conjunction with the feature exhibition Rock of Ages: East Tennessee’s Marble Industry  the Museum of East Tennessee History is inviting public participation in its ongoing efforts to study and document items made from marble quarried in East Tennessee, including  photographs, documents, and stories relating to marble history and workers. Anyone with relevant information is encouraged to bring these to a Tennessee Marble Documentation Day on Saturday, April 15, 2017 at the East Tennessee History Center, 601 S. Gay Street, Knoxville.

East Tennessee marble is prized by architects, builders, and sculptors for its structural and decorative properties. The marble industry was once an important sector of East Tennessee’s economy. By the mid-1850s, East Tennessee marble from Knox County had been chosen for the interiors of the Tennessee State Capitol and marble from Hawkins County was being installed inside the new House and Senate wings of the United States Capitol. In the decades that followed, East Tennessee’s varicolored marble was sought by architects for the interiors of a variety of public buildings: state capitol buildings, courthouses, city halls. Tennessee marble would soon also be ordered for high traffic railroad terminal flooring across the United States and Canada.

Reminders of the once prominent Tennessee marble industry can be seen today, in late 19th, early 20th century buildings on Gay Street and other corners of downtown, in building facades, steps and entranceways, and interior lobbies. The Knoxville Post Office and Federal Building on Main Street is a particularly fine example dating from the 1930s. And Knoxville, a city that has won national recognition for historic preservation, continues to embrace its marble heritage in modern buildings such as the expansion of the U.S. Custom House into the East Tennessee History Center and the exterior marble of the Knoxville Museum of Art.

The event is from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m., with a special panel discussion taking place from 10:30-11:30 a.m. The panel will feature Susan Knowles, Ph.D., of the Center of historic Preservation, Middle Tennessee State University, as moderator, as well as members of four families who were prominent in the marble business—Sonja Jones, Finbarr Saunders, Jean Vestal, and Beth Wolf, who will talk about their family’s experiences relating to the marble industry.

The program is free and open to the public. Visitors will also be invited to tour the museum for free and enjoy the Rock of Ages exhibition. The Museum of East Tennessee History is operated by the East Tennessee Historical Society and is located in the East Tennessee History Center at 601 S. Gay Street in downtown Knoxville. For further information, call (865) 215-8829 or visit www.eastTNhistory.org.

 


DNA testing lecture at ETHC

(Knoxville, TN) In a free workshop on March 25, 2017, from 1-3pm, noted genealogist Dr. George K. Schweitzer will explain how DNA testing works and how you can use it in family research. A frequent lecturer and the author of 22 books on genealogy, Dr. George K. Schweitzer is a professor of chemistry at the University of Tennessee and member of the ETHS Board of Directors.

Every cell in your body has a set of chemical strings called DNA. They contain DNA inherited from many of the ancestors in your family tree. Modern technology permits us to find the portions given to you by your forebears. By correlating this information with your genealogical research, you can trace back to most, if not all, of your ancestors through the past five generations. Comparison of your results with those of others can help you discover unknown cousins who may have valuable genealogical information which lets you expand and enrich your family tree. The test will also estimate your ethnic origins.

The workshop is part of the East Tennessee History Center’s free genealogy courses presented by the East Tennessee Historical Society, Knox County Public Library, McClung Historical Collection, and Knox County Archives. The workshops are free and open to the public. The lecture will begin at 1:00 p.m. in the auditorium at the East Tennessee History Center, 601 S. Gay Street, Knoxville.

For more information on the lecture, exhibitions, or museum hours, call 865-215-8824 or visit the website at www.EastTNHistory.org.


ETPA seeks property nominations

Knoxville – The East Tennessee Preservation Alliance (ETPA) is now accepting nominations for the 2017 East Tennessee Endangered 8, a listing of the eight most threatened historic sites in our region. The objective of the list is to inform our communities about the real threat of losing these important sites to development, demolition or lack of maintenance as well as the value of what will be lost if action isn’t taken soon to avoid their destruction. Nominations are due by March 30, 2017 and are accepted for sites at least 50 years old and located in Anderson, Blount, Campbell, Claiborne, Cocke, Grainger, Hamblen, Jefferson, Knox, Loudon, Monroe, Morgan, Roane, Scott, Sevier and Union counties. The 2017 East Tennessee Endangered 8 will be announced on May 1, 2017 to kick-off National Preservation Month. The nomination form and more information is available online at www.knoxheritage.org/ETPA.

ETPA has presented a list of endangered heritage sites in our region since 2010. The organization seeks to develop preservation strategies for each property included on the list. Endangered properties can be saved by working with property owners, developers, government officials, citizens and local historic organizations to find preservation solutions that work. Past endangered heritage lists can be found online at www.knoxheritage.org/ETPA.

About the East Tennessee Preservation Alliance

The East Tennessee Preservation Alliance works to preserve the structures and places with historic or cultural significance in Anderson, Blount, Campbell, Claiborne, Cocke, Grainger, Hamblen, Jefferson, Knox, Loudon, Monroe, Morgan, Roane, Scott, Sevier, and Union counties.

ETPA partners with Knox Heritage to serve as the regional arm for preservation activities in the 16 counties mentioned above. The ETPA board of directors is comprised of local leadership from each of the 16 counties. ETPA advocates on issues of major importance to historic preservation, collaborates with other organizations with similar interests and goals, works to educate the public on the many benefits of historic preservation and actively seeks strategies for addressing challenging historic preservation issues in the region.


McClung Museum hosts ‘Mr. Mummy’

KNOXVILLE—The McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, will host Dr. Bob Brier, one of the world’s foremost experts on mummies and Egyptology, to lecture on ancient Egyptian mummification processes on February 21, 2017 at 7:30 p.m.

The lecture, which is organized by The East Tennessee Society of the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) and the McClung Museum, reveals why the ancient Egyptian mummified and then goes on to describe a modern mummification.

Dr. Bob Brier, known as ‘Mr. Mummy,’ worked with Ronald Wade in 1994 to become the first people in 2,000 years to mummify a human cadaver in the ancient Egyptian style, using ancient tools and materials. The goal of the project was to learn more about the tools and surgical procedures used by ancient embalmers.

Brier and Wade went to Egypt to obtain natron, the dehydrating agent used by the ancient embalmers and also obtained frankincense and myrrh, just as the Egyptians did. Working at the University of Maryland Medical School, the two researchers used replicas of ancient tools to remove the brain through the nose and the internal organs through a three-inch abdominal incision. The project was the subject of a National Geographic television documentary

The lecture is part of exhibition-related programming for Divine Felines: Cats of Ancient Egypt, which runs at McClung Museum through May 7, 2017. The exhibition, which is organized by the Brooklyn Museum, explores the role of cats, lions, and other feline creatures in Egyptian mythology, kingship, and everyday life through nearly eighty different representations of cats from the Brooklyn Museum’s world-famous Egyptian collection.

The McClung Museum is located at 1327 Circle Park Drive. Museum admission is free, and the museum’s hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to Saturday and 1 to 5 p.m. on Sundays. Free two-hour museum parking passes are available from the parking kiosk at the entrance to Circle Park Drive during the week. Free parking is available on the weekends. Free public transportation to the museum is available via the Knoxville Trolley Vol Line.


Open House at Lloyd Branson home

Knoxville, TN – Knox Heritage will be hosting an open house at the recently renovated Branson House, former residence of acclaimed Knoxville artist Enoch Lloyd Branson, on Saturday, February 18, 2017 from 10AM to 2PM. The house is located at 1423 Branson Avenue in North Knoxville.

Built in 1922, the culturally significant Lloyd Branson House had been declared blighted by the City of Knoxville and included in the annual Knox Heritage Fragile Fifteen list of endangered historic places. After an initial design concept by Brian Pittman and two-year renovation by High Oaks Construction, the three bedroom, three bath house is ready for its new homeowners.

The renovation of the historic house was made possible by generous grants and donations from 1772 Foundation, City of Knoxville Preservation Fund, The Lloyd Branson Family, Chapman Family Foundation, Valspar and the National Trust for Historic Preservation, Scripps/HGTV, Modern Supply, Ferguson Plumbing, Knox Heritage Vintage Properties Committee and SESCO Lighting.

Knox Heritage was able to purchase the home through the City of Knoxville’s Homemaker program which seeks buyers for properties needing significant renovation. Initial funding came through the organization’s J. Allen Smith Endangered Properties Fund.

For more information about this event visit www.knoxheritage.org.

About Lloyd Branson

Enoch Lloyd Branson (1853–1925) was best known for his portraits of Southern politicians and depictions of early East Tennessee history. One of the most influential figures in Knoxville’s early art circles, Mr. Branson was a mentor to fellow Knoxville artist Catherine Wiley and is credited with discovering twentieth-century portraitist Beauford Delaney. He operated a popular portrait shop with photographer Frank McCrary on Gay Street and is responsible for the development of the neighborhood in which this home is located, serving as the planner and builder for many homes on the street. Originally named Rhode Island Avenue, the street name was changed to Branson Avenue by the City of Knoxville to recognize his cultural contributions.

About Knox Heritage

Knox Heritage works to preserve the structures and places with historic or cultural significance in Knox County, Tennessee. Established in 1974 as a non-profit historic preservation organization, Knox Heritage is chartered by the state of Tennessee and governed by a board of directors representing all areas of our community. Knox Heritage is the only organization in the region that works every day to protect our treasured structures and places. Without Knox Heritage, many of our important buildings, along with the history and charm of the area, would have been demolished.

Knox Heritage carries out its mission through a variety of programs and encourages community support through education and advocacy. Membership in the organization is by annual dues, which are tax deductible, and is open to all individuals, businesses, and organizations recognizing the foresight of historical preservation.


CBT presents The Busy Body

KNOXVILLE, TN – A fast-paced farce packed with memorable characters, “The Busy Body” runs in the Clarence Brown Theatre’s Carousel Theatre February 22 – March 12, 2017. In this comedy, a young woman, her handsome lover, and their friends plot to escape a controlling guardian. Will a nosey nobleman ruin the plan or save the day?

Charlotte Munson as Miranda in the CBT’s “The Busy Body.”  The play was written by Susanna Centlivre in 1709, with adaptations by UT Faculty Misty Anderson and John Sipes. Photo Liz Aaron.

A Pay What You Wish Preview performance, where patrons can name their own price, will be held Wednesday, February 22 from Noon to 7 pm at the theatre. A Talk Back with the actors will take place Sunday, March 5 following the matinee. A panel discussion in association with the Commission for Women will take place on March 9 at 3:30 pm in the Carousel Theatre. The Open Captioned performance is Sunday, March 12 at 2:00 pm.

According to Restoration scholar Anderson, Centlivre’s comedy was the most popular play written by a woman in the eighteenth century and among the 10 most popular plays of the entire period. Audiences in Charleston, Williamsburg, Baltimore, New York, and other colonial theatre towns in the early days of America flocked to it. It even played in Havana and Kingston, Jamaica! The play’s pace calls for the kind of physical comedy one might have seen on “The Carol Burnett Show.”

“The Busy Body” gives us a window into the world of marriage at a time when women’s roles were just beginning to change, and playwrights like Centlivre were beginning to see women as equals to men. Manners and codes of conduct required curtsies, bows, and polite forms of address, but marriage contracts were also big business.
The two heroines struggle against arrangements that would turn them into mere goods traded between men using secret identities, tricks, messages in code, and helpful waiting maids. The results are hilarious and surprisingly modern; the young women are frank, spunky, and unstoppable, and their lovers seem to love them all the more for it.

Free and convenient parking is available in the McClung Tower Garage on Volunteer Boulevard.


Ancient Egyptian cats at McClung

KNOXVILLE—The McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, opens the new exhibition “Divine Felines: Cats of Ancient Egypt” on Saturday, Feb. 4, 2017.

From domesticated cats to mythic symbols of divinities, felines played an important role in ancient Egyptian imagery for thousands of years. Now, 80 items from the Egyptian holdings of the Brooklyn Museum will be on view in “Divine Felines” at the museum through May 7, 2017. Stela with the Gods Bes and Tutu, 332-30 B.C.E.. Limestone, Brooklyn Museum. Charles Edwin Wilbour Fund. Image courtesy McClung Museum.

Likely first domesticated in ancient Egypt, cats were revered for their fertility and valued for their ability to protect homes and granaries from vermin. But felines were also associated with royalty and deities. Combining a lion’s body and a king’s head, sphinxes guarded temple entrances and provided protection as temple objects. The ferocious goddess Sakhmet, depicted as a lioness or lion-headed woman, and the goddess Bastet, represented as a cat or a cat-headed woman, together symbolized the duality of feline nature — caring yet dangerous. The male leonine gods Bes and Tutu were popularly worshiped as protectors of fertility, health and fortune.

Exhibition programming, all free and open to the public, also will include:

A lecture on mummification in ancient Egypt by scholar Bob Brier, co-sponsored by the East Tennessee Society of the Archaeological Institute of America, at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 21.

Two free family fun days—”Purrs from the Past,” 1–4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 25, and “To Kitties’ Health,” 1­–4 p.m. Saturday, March 25.

A stroller tour for caregivers and infants through four-year-olds, “Kitties and Toddlers,” at 10 a.m. Monday, Feb. 27.

A lecture on cat behavior by Julie Albright from UT’s School of Veterinary Medicine at 2 p.m. Sunday, March 19.
“Divine Felines” is organized by the Brooklyn Museum and Yekaterina Barbash, associate curator of Egyptian Art at the Brooklyn Museum.

The exhibition is presented by the Elaine A. Evans Museum Fund, Aletha and Clayton Brodine Museum Fund, the First Tennessee Foundation, UT Ready for the World, Audrey Duncan, Wahid and Samia Hanna, the Archaeological Institute of America, the UT College of Veterinary Medicine and the Arab American Club of Knoxville. Additional support is provided by Knox County, the City of Knoxville, and the Arts and Heritage Fund.

The McClung Museum is at 1327 Circle Park Drive. Museum admission is free, and the museum’s hours are 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Monday to Saturday and 1–5 p.m. Sundays. Groups may schedule tours by calling 865-974-2144 or emailing museum@utk.edu. Free two-hour museum parking passes are available from the parking information building at the entrance to Circle Park Drive on weekdays by request. Free parking is available on Circle Park Drive on a first-come, first-served basis on weekends. Free public transportation to the museum is also available via the Knoxville Trolley Vol Line.


Basketball Hall of Fame names finalists

Knoxville, TN – The Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame announced its 12 finalists for induction into the 2017 Hall of Fame; they are: Yelena Baranova (player), Rose Marie Battaglia (coach), Sally Bell (official), Evelyn Blalock (coach), Joan Bonvicini (coach), Nora Lynn Finch (contributor), Christine Grant (contributor), Rick Insell (coach), Louise O’Neal (veteran), Crystal Robinson (player), Sheryl Swoopes (player), and Kara Wolters (player).

The six-member Class of 2017 will be selected from the 12 finalists and announced on ESPN on February 12.

The Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame Board of Directors serves as the selection committee in determining the individuals to be inducted each year. Voting is based on minimum candidate requirements, which include record of performance, national or international recognition, and contributions to the game of women’s basketball.

The mission of the Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame is to “honor the past, celebrate the present, and promote the future” of women’s basketball.

For information regarding the Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame or the 2017 Induction Ceremony please visit www.wbhof.com.


Stargazing event at Marble Springs

Marble Springs will host a Winter Stargazing Session on Saturday, January 28, 2017. This session will be led by Gary Noland, adjunct instructor of Astronomy at the University of Tennessee. Guests will meet at the cottage where they will begin with a discussion about navigating from constellations.

The stargazing will begin at about 7 pm and go until 9 pm where guests will search for night sky landmarks such as winter constellations as well as identifying planets that are visible during the winter months. Participation in our nighttime viewing sessions is a $1 donation per person. Details are subject to change.

All nighttime viewing sessions will take place at Marble Springs State Historic Site at 1220 W. Gov. John Sevier Highway, Knoxville, TN 37920. For more information email info@marblesprings.net or call (865)573-5508.

Programming assistance for this event is provided by Knox County. Marble Springs is funded under an agreement with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Tennessee Historical Commission, and supplemented by additional funds raised by the Governor John Sevier Memorial Association.

Marble Springs State Historic Site is the last remaining home of John Sevier. Born in Virginia in 1745, John Sevier made a name for himself as a Revolutionary War Hero during the Battle of Kings Mountain (1780), a key player & Governor of the short-lived State of Franklin (1784-1788), and ultimately was elected to serve as the first Governor of the State of Tennessee (1796).

Marble Springs was the approximate 350-acre farm that Sevier lived on from 1801-1815, the last years of his life. Sevier named his farm Marble Springs because of the Tennessee Rose Marble that was quarried on site and the natural springs that flowed on the property.

While visiting Marble Springs, visitors will have the opportunity to tour several historic structures that are designed to represent various aspects of John Sevier’s life and times. These structures include: the Tavern, Loom House, Smoke House, Spring House, and the John Sevier Cabin and detached kitchen.


Jazz Lunch features top brass

The next concert in the Knoxville Jazz Lunch series will feature “Top Brass with Thomas Heflin & Mitch Butler.” The event will take place on Wednesday, February 1, 2017 from noon to 1 p.m. at The Square Room, located in Market Square in downtown Knoxville.

Though sometimes overlooked, the quintet with a front line of trumpet and trombone has a rich history in straight ahead jazz. Giants like Clark Terry & Bob Brookmeyer, Woody Shaw & Steve Turre, JJ Johnson and Nat Adderley, et al, left behind an enormous body of work.

For this special concert, trumpeter Thomas Heflin (a former KJO member) and trombonist Mitch Butler team up to pay tribute to the great masters of brass who pioneered this exciting sound. Keith Brown (piano), Tommy Sauter (bass), and Kenneth Brown (drums) will join Heflin and Butler for this special jazz lunch concert.

Admission to the concert is $15 and includes a lunch buffet served up by Café 4. Tickets are available online at http://www.knoxjazz.org or by visiting Café 4 in person prior to the show.

The Square Room is a new, state-of-the-art performance venue in downtown Knoxville, TN in the Historic Market Square district. It is housed in the rear of the 4 Market Square Building along with its counterpart Café 4, a full-service restaurant and coffee bar.

For more info visit: http://www.knoxjazz.org/


Knox Library celebrates O’Connor

In January 2017, Knox County Public Library System is exploring the life and work of Flannery O’Connor, the woman who arguably created “Southern Gothic” literature with her haunting stories and eccentric characters. Join us for a six-part series led by Ed Francisco, Professor of English and writer-in-residence at Pellissippi State Community College.

The series kicks off on Sunday, January 8, 2017 with a screening of the award-winning documentary Flannery O’Connor: Uncommon Grace followed by a discussion with its filmmakers, Bridget Kurt and Michael Jordan.

The series continues each Tuesday evening in January at Lawson McGhee Library with a discussion of one of O’Connor’s seminal short stories.

January 10: “Good Country People”
January 17: “A Displaced Person”​
Sunday, January 22, the series will screen John Huston’s Wise Blood.
January 24: “A Good Man is Hard to Find”
January 31: Conclusion

Despite her premature death at age 39, Flannery O’Connor left behind one of the most haunting and strikingly original bodies of work in 20th century literature. With the rural South as her backdrop, she brought to life a string of eccentric characters torn between their worldy ambitions and the need for a more enduring truth. While critics called her stories “brutal” and “grotesque,” O’Connor said, “All my stories are about the action of grace on a character who is not very willing to support it.”

The Lawson McGhee Library is the main library of Knox County Public Library in Knoxville, Tennessee. It is located at 500 West Church Avenue in downtown Knoxville.


Lecture offered on TN marble

(Knoxville, TN) “From the Archives: Finding East Tennessee’s Marble Story” is the subject of a lecture to be presented by Dr. Susan W. Knowles, Wednesday, December 7, 2016 at the East Tennessee History Center.

Her interest piqued by Tennessee marble she saw in the United States Capitol, Knowles set out to learn more about marble from the East Tennessee region and its use in buildings and monuments across the nation. The resulting research, images, and interviews became the subject of her doctoral dissertation and now form the basis of a feature exhibition Rock of Ages: East Tennessee’s Marble Industry, of which Knowles is the guest curator.

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East Tennessee marble is prized the world over. The exhibition explores the industry and offers a first-time look into the factors that launched the rock’s fame and crowned Knoxville as the Marble City. The beautiful exhibit features an array of artifacts, videos, and photographs showcasing the importance and diversity of East Tennessee’s marble industry. Lecture attendees are invited to tour the exhibition following the lecture

Susan W. Knowles is a graduate of the Public History program at MTSU, with an M.A. in Art History from Vanderbilt University, and a Master of Library Science degree from George Peabody College. She currently serves as the Digital Humanities Research Fellow for the Center for Historic Preservation at Middle Tennessee State University. Knowles served project curator for “Trials and Triumphs: Tennesseans’ Search for Citizenship, Community, and Opportunity,” a website and digital collection on the “Jim Crow” era in Tennessee. She is currently overseeing the graduate research assistants at MTSU and coordinating building the “Southern Places” online research collections, which document more than thirty years of field work at the Center for Historic Preservation.

The program is sponsored by Consolidated Nuclear Security, LLC and is and free and open to the public. The lecture will begin at noon at the East Tennessee History Center, 601 S. Gay Street, Knoxville. Guests are invited to bring a “Brown Bag” lunch and enjoy the lecture. Soft drinks will be available. For more information on the lecture, exhibitions, or museum hours, call 865-215-8824 or visit the website at www.EastTNHistory.org.


History Museum hosts holiday event

The East Tennessee Historical Society will host a Holiday Open House on Saturday, December 10, 2016, with entertainment by the Smokyland Sound Chorus of the Greater Knoxville Chapter of the Barbershop Harmony Society. Activities include craft demonstrations and the sale of handmade items, free ornament and craft making for the kids, and holiday refreshments. Local crafter Karen Micheletta will have a selection of her handmade items made from antique quilts to purchase.

ETHS staff will lead a special activity called “A Christmas Story: Traditions Old and New from Me to You,” where audience members, young and old, will contribute to a composition of Christmas memories from yesterday and today to create a unique Christmas story or poem.

Visitors are invited to browse the ETHS Museum Store for a 10% discount on a great selection of traditional gifts, history books, and children’s items. The 10 percent public discount is good for this day only. ETHS members receive a 10 percent discount throughout the year and 15% off throughout the month of December.

Holiday Open House events are free and open to the public from 11 a.m. – 3 p.m. The Museum of East Tennessee is located at the East Tennessee History Center, 601 S. Gay Street, Knoxville.

For more information, visit www.eastTNhistory.org or call 865-215- 8824.


Concert features Mike Baggetta

The next concert in the Jazz Lunch series will feature a tribute to Ornette Coleman with Mike Baggetta and will take place on Wednesday, December 7, 2016, from noon to 1pm at the Square Room in downtown Knoxville. Admission to the concert is $15 and includes a lunch buffet served up by Café 4. Tickets are available online at http://www.knoxjazz.org or by visiting Café 4 in person prior to the show.

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Drawing from the works of the Free-Jazz pioneer, saxophonist and composer Ornette Coleman, Mike Baggetta has assembled a group of fearless improvisors with whom to reinterpret Coleman’s music with a newfound experimentalism paying tribute to the spirit of its creator. Photo: Knoxville Jazz Orchestra.

Patrons to this Jazz Lunch may expect classic Ornette tunes like Lonely Woman and Ramblin’ next to lesser known masterpieces like What Reason Could I Give and War Orphans, among others. Matt Nelson (bass) and Nolan Nevels (drums) will join Mike Baggetta for this special jazz lunch concert.

Special thanks to East Tennessee PBS, WUOT 91.9 FM, The Square Room, and Weird Monkey Studios for support of the Jazz Lunch Series.

The Square Room is a new, state-of- the-art performance venue in downtown Knoxville, TN in the Historic Market Square district. It is housed in the rear of the 4 Market Square Building along with its counterpart Café 4, a full-service restaurant and coffee bar.


Mabry-Hazen offers free tours

Mabry-Hazen House in Knoxville invites the public to join them for their annual Christmas Tours. This is the final event of the year before the historic property closes for the winter.

Rooms of the house will be decorated in the spirit of the holiday season. Tours are scheduled for Saturday, December 10th from 5-8pm and Sunday, December 11th from 2-5pm. The event is free of charge and light refreshments will be served. Donations are encouraged and appreciated. Mabry-Hazen House will be open by appointment from December 12th until March 1st, 2017.

Built in 1858, the Mabry-Hazen House is strategically located on the highest hill east of downtown Knoxville with sweeping views in all directions. The home was occupied and defended by both armies during the Civil War. It housed three generations of the same family for 130 years, and the museum showcases one of the largest original family collections in America.

Please call 865-522-8661 or visit www.mabryhazen.com for more information.


Call for artists for MLK tribute

The Arts & Culture Alliance of Greater Knoxville and the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemorative Commission announce a call for entries for the third annual Gallery of Arts Tribute, developed to recognize local artists and honor the life and times of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Approximately 40-50 fine art works of all media will be selected for display in the Atrium, North Wall, and display case galleries of the beautifully-restored Emporium Center at 100 S. Gay Street, Knoxville’s downtown arts anchor location, from January 6-27, 2017.

The Emporium is free and open to the public Monday-Friday, 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM and additional hours for special events.

Artwork should be delivered on Tuesday, January 3, between 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM.

The exhibition seeks to feature:
Works by African and African American artists living within 50 miles of Knoxville; and/or
Works that pertain to the themes of Unity, Community, Love, Reconciliation, Social Justice, and Civil Rights by any artist living within 50 miles of Knoxville.

Entries must be original and completed within the last five years in the following categories: 2-D (painting, drawing, mixed media, printmaking, photography) and 3-D (sculpture of all media). The maximum allowed size is 60” x 60” in any direction including frame or stand. Weight is not to exceed 50 lbs. unless special arrangements are made. Artwork must be suitably framed/mounted and wired for installation.

There is no entry fee. Each artist may bring up to three pieces for consideration. Submitted works will be juried by staff members of the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemorative Commission and the Arts & Culture Alliance.

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The Gallery of Arts Tribute in 2015 featured the work of 26 local artists. Pictured works from the 2015 Tribute, by: Hawa Ware-Johnson, Albert Baah, and Tina Curry. Photo submitted.

The mission of the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemorative Commission is to reaffirm and reflect upon the American ideals of freedom, justice and peace. To that end, we pledge to work inclusively with community partners to: lift and live principles of non-violence, equality and love; tell the stories of the struggles; and provide education and leadership training for adults and youth.

Artists may view the information, complete the entry form, and/or download an application at www.knoxalliance.com/mlk-tribute/.

 


See Ramsey House by candlelight

Knoxville’s historic Ramsey House will once again offer a unique holiday experience with the fundraising candlelight tour and dinner in the beautifully decorated, 1797 historic home of Francis and Peggy Alexander Ramsey on December 2-3, 2016, at 6 p.m.

The event will be held at Historic Ramsey House 2614 Thorn Grove Pike, Knoxville, Tennessee. Tickets are for individuals or groups up to ten persons; $125 per person donation to benefit Historic Ramsey House. Reservations are required 865-546- 0745.

For more information, Email judy@ramseyhouse.org.

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Also known as Swan Pond, the Ramsey House was constructed circa 1797 by English architect Thomas Hope for Colonel Francis Alexander Ramsey (1764–1820), whose family operated a plantation at the site until the U.S. Civil War.  In 1969, the house was added to the National Register of Historic Places for its architecture and its role in the region’s early 19th-century history. Photo courtesy Ramsey House.


Free museum visits for veterans

The East Tennessee Historical Society invites all veterans, active duty military, and their families to visit the Museum of East Tennessee History as our guests on Veterans Day, November 11, 2016 from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.

“Tennesseans have a proud tradition of stepping to the fore in defense of our nation and earning the state the nickname, the ‘Volunteer State,’” says ETHS Director Cherel Henderson. “We are pleased to honor the contributions of our military, past and present, by inviting them to visit the museum as our special guests on this day.”

The signature exhibition Voices of the Land: The People of East Tennessee explores three centuries of life in our region. Visitors will find stories and artifacts from the Revolutionary War to the War of 1812, and the Civil War to World War I and World War II. The Museum of East Tennessee History is open to the public before and after the Veterans Day Parade, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Museum of East Tennessee History is located at the East Tennessee History Center, 601 S. Gay Street, Knoxville.

About East Tennessee Historical Society
Established in 1834, the East Tennessee Historical Society is widely acknowledged as one of the most active history organizations in the state and enjoys a national reputation for excellence in programming and education. For 182 years the East Tennessee Historical Society has been helping East Tennesseans hold on to our unique heritage—recording the events, collecting the artifacts, and saving the stories that comprise the history we all share.


KKB helps preserve train mural

Keep Knoxville Beautiful (KKB) is on a mission to preserve the Knoxville Historic Train Mural, located on South Central Street in the courtyard of the Love Shack Restaurant in the Old City. Commissioned by KKB and created in 2001 by Walt Fieldsa, Eva Allawos, and Randall Starnes, the mural has stood for 15 years and shows significant deterioration. Keep Knoxville Beautiful has a goal of raising $4,500 to fund the restoration by original artist Walt Fieldsa.

The recent and devastating loss of KKB’s Knoxville Music History Mural from the wall of 116 East Jackson in the Old City highlighted the importance of ongoing stewardship for KKB’s second mural.

“The Knoxville Historic Train Mural is our only remaining mural and we are passionate about restoring it as soon as we can,” states Patience Melnik, Keep Knoxville Beautiful’s executive director. “Restoration work of this kind becomes more difficult and costly as the original artwork fades with time.”

Like the Music Mural, the Train Mural is faded and cracked from age and the elements, and the ownership of the building has changed since KKB originally obtained permission to create it. In this case, new owners Laura and Shawn Lyke guarantee the mural’s protection and are very supportive of efforts to revitalize it.

The mural depicts an important era in Knoxville’s historic development. It commemorates the impact that railroads had on the development of our city—both culturally and economically. After the introduction of the railroad around 1850, Knoxville grew from a river town with only 2,000 residents to a major wholesale center for the Southeast. In 1901, Knoxville saw the introduction and establishment of the Southern Railway Company, which built the Southern Terminal on Depot Street, just blocks from the Historic Train Mural.

To donate or for more information on Keep Knoxville Beautiful and the Historic Train Mural Restoration Project please visit www.keepknoxvillebeautiful.org.

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Book celebrates local music

(Knoxville, TN) Knoxville’s Mid-Day Merry-Go-Round and its cast of musicians are the subject of a lecture and book signing by Ruth B. White at the East Tennessee History Center, November 6, 2016. The occasion celebrates the launch of White’s new book, Knoxville’s ‘Merry-Go-Round,’ Ciderville, and the East Tennessee Music Scene.

The noonday show was broadcast live from WNOX for more than twenty years and attracted a loyal and enthusiastic audience. The host of on-air talent include many who went on to Nashville to become country greats, such as Roy Acuff, Chet Atkins, Archie Campbell, Don Gibson, the Carters, Homer and Jethro, and Carl Smith, to only name a few.

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Knoxville’s ‘Merry-Go-Round,’ Ciderville, and the East Tennessee Country Music Scene is a warm, sometimes hilarious, insider’s look back at this early period of country music, the stories behind the lyrics, and the shared laughter, tragedies, and tears of the Merry-Go-Round cast.

Ruth married Harold White in 1965. He had been a steel guitarist on the Merry-Go-Round and was playing with Grand Ole Opry superstar Hank Williams when they met. Together they became an important part of the Nashville music scene, Harold as a musician and “song plugger,” and Ruth in music publishing.
David West and the Cider Mountain Boys will provide a nostalgic look at music popular in the Merry-Go-Round heyday. A banjoist, David played with the Bonnie Lou and Buster Show, then as a regular on the Cas Walker Show until it went off the air. An astute businessman, he is involved in many local enterprises, but his real love is the operation of Ciderville, selling musical instruments and one of the largest Martin Guitar dealers in the country. It also serves as a popular venue for country music performances. Ruth devotes a chapter in her book to David and Ciderville, describing it as a place where “sounds Nashville has forgotten, original sounds of the mountains and rural areas” are still being played.

A foreword by WNTT-AM radio host James Perry introduces the book.

The program at the East Tennessee History Center is from 2:30-4:30 p.m., Sunday, November 6. The event is free and open to the public. The East Tennessee History Center is located at 601 S. Gay Street, Knoxville. For more information on the lecture, exhibitions, or museum hours, call 865-215-8824 or visit the website at www.EastTNHistory.org.


Authors to speak on TN history

Tennessee Technological University professors Calvin Dickinson and Michael Birdwell will discuss their new book People of the Upper Cumberland: Achievements and Contradictions in a Brown Bag Lecture at noon on Wednesday, October 12, 2016. The anthology, recently named the “Tennessee History Book of the Year” by the Tennessee Library Association, presents a complex view of the rich history and culture of the Tennessee-Kentucky Upper Cumberland, an area composed of the 24 counties that mostly border the eastern half of the Cumberland River.
Birdwell and Dickinson will discuss the history of the region, politicians, moonshiners, changing medical practices, women’s roles, race relations, and more. Also featured will be a few of the Upper Cumberland’s most famous residents, Cordell Hull, John Gore, John Catron, Charles Faulkner Bryan, and Champ Ferguson. The book will be available for purchase and signing by Dickinson and Birdwell following the lecture.

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Dr. Michael E. Birdwell is a professor of history at Tennessee Technological University and the author of several books, including Celluloid Soldiers: Warner Brothers Campaign against Nazism and Rural Life and Culture of the Upper Cumberland. Birdwell also serves as the chair of the Tennessee Great Wars Commission. Dr. W. Calvin Dickinson is a professor emeritus of history at Tennessee Technological University. He currently serves on the Tennessee Historical Commission and has written or co-authored more than 22 books, including Sister States, Enemy States: The Civil War in Kentucky and Tennessee and Tennessee: State of the Nation.

The program is sponsored by Consolidated Nuclear Security, LLC and is free and open to the public. The lecture will begin at noon at the East Tennessee History Center, 601 S. Gay Street, Knoxville. Guests are invited to bring a “Brown Bag” lunch and enjoy the lecture. Soft drinks will be available.

For more information on the lecture, exhibitions, or museum hours, call 865-215-8824 or visit the website at www.EastTNHistory.org.


Fall great time to get a new tat

CELEBRATE KNOXVILLE – While you’re thnking about fall decorations, why not add a little color to yourself? This week Celebrate Knoxville paid a visit to Liquid Ink Tattoo to chat with artist Tony Maskevich about industry trends and to ask if Knoxville has its own tat vibe.

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Tony Maskevich (pictured above) says he has worked as a tattoo artist since October of 1991, and since that time he has “heard it all from folks sitting in the chair” and has developed his own strict standards for a clean shop. He has even been a special speaker on industry standards at the University of Tennessee and has expanded his art into creating custom framed artwork (including airbrush) as well as custom design and installation of signage for other businesses. Photo by Laura Long Martin for Celebrate Knoxville.

“Tennessee has some pretty strict standards for this work, but I go even beyond that,” Maskevich says. “You saw my daughter in the lobby, right? I want this shop to be clean enough for me and for my family, as well as for all my clients. Some of the things I do here, (he points with a gloved hand to disposable plastic coverings on the ink lines from his machine and on containers on his desk) aren’t law, but I do them anyway.”

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Cleanliness and hygiene are always important for Liquid Ink Tattoos, and they are inspected six times a year, Maskevich said. Fines for health inspection infringements can range from $50 to $500. The company has strict standards that go beyond what the law requires, and the excellent inspections history for the company is a testimony to high standards.

As far as trends go, Maskevich says geometric patterns from Europe are making their way into the Knoxville market, as well as tattoos designed to look like watercolor paintings. In urban cities like Knoxville, Tennessee, he sees a lot of steampunk, mandalas, and a lot of images that morph into other images like M. C. Escher paintings. As often as he can, he goes to conventions such as Tattoo Carnival of Mayhem in Pasadena, Texas, to learn tricks of the trade from other artists and to keep up with trends.

“Tribal will never go away,” he says, referring to designs that look like black and white drawings. “And I can’t tell you where those designs came from in the beginning, but now it is a standard in this business.”

Editor’s Note: Wiki says the word “tattoo” comes from the Polynesian word “tatau”, meaning “to write.”

Traditional tattoos refer to enduring symbols of a variety of nations and cultures, such as tigers, eagles, stars, swords and other weapons, and fire.

“Traditional tattoos are old school, and are respected designs among equipment makers and ink manufacturers,” Maskevich said. “That would be like the tiger with the sword through his head, or the nautical star, which is considered by some to be a reminder to seek balance in life (star points north, to find your way home).” Other symbolic designs may indicate that a person has spent time in prison (cobweb), survived a suicide attempt (semicolon) or witnessed and/or committed a murder (teardrop).

Maskevich says in 26 years in business he has heard many stories from clients, and since tattoos can be deeply personal, there is a measure of confidentiality to his work. He loves clients that bring in art that they want him to duplicate, but sometimes gets annoyed with people who bring in a photo from Pinterest and want that exact tattoo, which is a challenge sometimes, especially if the design is complicated.

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Maskevich says he works hard to produce the style of work clients are looking for, if not that specific design. Costs for a simple tattoo start at about $60 and can go up into hundreds, even thousands of dollars for large pieces, such as back pieces, or sleeves that cover part or all of an arm. Clients that also want body piercing can choose from a wide variety of jewelry at the shop. Gift certificates are also available.

The business often gets involved with fundraisers, and in October this year Liquid Ink plans to donate a portion of the proceeds to a friend, Bobbi Foster, who is a survivor of breast cancer.

Does Knoxville have its own tat vibe?

“Every state has tattoos that are popular for that place,” he says. “Here in East Tennessee, you better stock up on orange (ink).”

Liquid Ink is located at 12215-B Chapman Highway in Seymour, Tennessee. Call for an appointment at 865-333-5963.


Historic Parkridge offers Home Tour

The Historic Parkridge Neighborhood will be hosting a Home Tour on Saturday, October 8, 2016 from 1:00-6:00 p.m. Present-day Parkridge encompasses the early Edgewood subdivision which contains many houses designed by George F. Barber, Knoxville’s famous 19th-early 20th century, Victorian house architect. Parkridge has gained notoriety for having the largest concentration of George Barber homes in the nation. This area has been known as part of Park City to residents and former residents for over 100 years. Today the Edgewood-Park City Historic District is on the National Register of Historic Places.

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The homes will span the eras from the 1890’s to the 1920s, and are good examples of the ongoing revitalization of the neighborhood. In addition, a walking tour of about 30 homes not open to the public will be offered. The walking tour will focus on the history of the Barber-designed homes and their former occupants.

Tickets are $10 per person if purchased in advance and $12 on the day of the event. Children under 12 are admitted for free. Parking is available at the Ashley Nicole Park, 620 Winona Street, 37917. Tickets may be purchased in advance at Last Days of Autumn Brewery, Three Rivers Market, or online at www.parkridgecommunity.wordpress.com. Tickets may be purchased until 4:00pm the day of the tour at Ashley Nicole Park. Walking is necessary and many houses have steps. Parkridge is a bike-able neighborhood and tour-goers are welcome to ride bicycles.

More information is available at historicparkridge@gmail.com, or 865-406-4364.


Knox Heritage hosts fall events

Knox Heritage has a lot going on for fall 2016, including a “behind the scenes” look at the restoration of the Farragut Hotel in downtown Knoxville and the Big Bash at Buck Brothers celebrating the restoration of the historic Rexall Building in Lenior City.

Be among the first revelers to celebrate the return of the Buck Brothers Building on October 22, also known as the Waller or Rexall Building. This century-old icon on Broadway in downtown Lenoir City is being restored and we are celebrating its history as a mercantile business, drug store, and dance hall. Enjoy flavors from the past and present with dishes that are Loudon County favorites. Start the evening with a trip back in time at the Lenoir City Museum next door. Then progress into the exciting Buck Brothers project to meet and hear from the developers Diane Powell and Mark Uhran. Dine and dance the night away to a premier band.

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The “Behind the Scenes Tour” of the historic Farragut Hotel is October 21, 2016. This free event for Knox Heritage members will allow guests to see the $22 million transformation of this local icon while it’s underway thanks to Dover Development. The end result in 2017 will be a Hyatt Place Hotel that respects the historic character of the building. Festive beverages and savory snacks will be served.

Not a member of Knox Heritage yet? All memberships include your entire household and free admission to at least two “Behind the Scenes Tours” each year, our Preservation Awards Celebration in November, early access to Summer Suppers tickets, plus discounts at local retailers and restaurants and other perks.

For more information, email to rsvp@knoxheritage.org or call the Knox Heritage office (865) 523-8008.


Mayor to proclaim Louie Bluie Day

Sixteen years after legendary stringband musician and artist Howard “Louie Bluie” Armstrong performed at the Laurel Theater as part of a celebrated homecoming visit to East Tennessee, his son Ralphe will pay tribute to his father’s legacy with a concert at the same venue. In honor of the occasion, Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero will personally present a proclamation designating September 22, 2016 as “Louie Bluie Day.”

Ralphe Armstrong, a Grammy-nominated jazz and rock bassist based in Detroit, will perform as part of the Armstrong Legacy Trio, which also includes guitarist Ray Kamalay and violinist/mandolin player John Reynolds. The concert is Thursday, September 22, 8 p.m. at the Laurel Theater.

Through her proclamation, Mayor Rogero’s will acknowledge Tennessee native Howard Armstrong’s musical virtuosity and his part in music history as a member of the Tennessee Chocolate Drops, who recorded for Vocalion during the St. James recording sessions of 1929. Howard, who was born in Dayton and grew up in LaFollette, received a WC Handy Award (now Blues Music Award), and the National Endowment for the Arts called him a “national treasure” when they made him a National Heritage Fellow award in 1990.

Tickets to the concert are $20 for Jubilee Community Arts members, $21 for non-members. Advance tickets are available online at JubileeArts.org; remaining tickets will be sold at the door starting at 7:30 p.m.

Ralphe was performing with his father by age 5. By 13, he played with Smokey Robinson and the Miracles; by 16 he affiliated with Jean-Luc Ponty and Frank Zappa (which continued for many years). The original bassist in the Mahavishnu Orchestra with John MacLaughlin, Ralphe has performed and recorded with Aretha Franklin, James Carter, Sting, Roger Daltrey, Eminem, and many more artists in a wide variety of genres. Earlier this year, Ralphe was honored by his hometown and voted “Best Jazz Instrumentalist” at the Detroit Music Awards.

Kamalay has shared stages with Mark O’Connor, Doc Watson, Jethro Burns, Steve Goodman, and others. He began performing with Howard and Ralphe in 1988 when the three of them formed the Howard Armstrong Trio.

Reynolds was influenced by a number of traditional music masters including Howard Armstrong, with whom he performed for decades.

The Armstrong Legacy Trio’s performance at the Laurel Theater previews their 4:15 p.m. set at the 10th Louie Bluie Music & Arts Festival on Saturday, September 24, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. at Cove Lake State Park in Caryville, Tenn. For more information about the festival, visit LouieBluie.org.


Carpetbag Theatre receives grant

The Carpetbag Theatre, Inc. is proud to announce the receipt of a major multi-year grant awarded from The Roy Cockrum Foundation in support of the organization’s 50th Anniversary Celebration Series.

The Carpetbag Theatre, Inc. will be utilizing the funds received to remount six of the most beloved plays from the theatre’s past, as well as supporting the future creation and development of Carpetbag’s newest original work currently entitled, “Bricks.”

With generous support from The Roy Cockrum Foundation, Carpetbag will be remounting these original works as fully produced performances at fully equipped Knoxville and Maryville, Tennessee venues. The performances will take place over the course of the three years leading up to the Anniversary celebration (2017, 2018, 2019) with two productions per year. CBT will invite former ensemble members who have remained in the professional field to return as guest artists and directors of the project.

The scheduled plays to be presented are as follows: Between A Ballad and A Blues, Nothin’ Nice, Dark Cowgirls and Prairie Queens, Ce Nitram Sacul, SWOPERA (a Spoken Word Opera), and Red Summer. The development of Carpetbag’s newest work, “Bricks” will trace the history of the African American brick making industry and its significance to the region.

The Carpetbag Theatre is a Professional African American Legacy Theater company with a rich history of service to diverse populations. As an intergenerational ensemble company, the company’s efforts are to engage communities of color and other disenfranchised communities. An ensemble company both artistically and administratively, CBT works collaboratively to fulfill this mission, to build communities and to develop social capital, emphasizing inclusion and cross-cultural dialogue.

The mission of The Roy Cockrum Foundation is to award grants to support world-class performing arts projects in not-for-profit professional theaters throughout the United States.


Living History at Marble Springs

THIS WEEKEND Marble Springs State Historic Site is pleased to host a weekend of Living History in celebration of the life and times of the first governor of Tennessee, John Sevier, in commemoration of his 271 st birthday. John Sevier Days Living History Weekend will take place Saturday, September 17, 2016 from 10:00 AM– 5:00 PM and Sunday, September 18, from 11:00 – 4:00 PM. You can expect to enjoy 18th century demonstrations such as open-hearth cooking, spinning and weaving, blacksmithing, weapons demonstrations that will showcase period-appropriate firearms, 18th century style militia drills, regional craft demonstrations, historic lecture, and hands on archeology activities. Food, drinks, and special treats will be available.

Admission for Sevier Days is $5.00 per adult (16+); $3 per child (7-15); 6 and under FREE; Parking is free. All proceeds benefit the mission of preservation and education of the Marble Springs State Historic Site.

For more information call (865)573-5508 or email infor@marblesprings.net or visit www.marblesprings.net.

Programming assistance for this event is provided by Knox County. Marble Springs is funded under an agreement with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Tennessee Historical Commission, and supplemented by additional funds raised by the Governor John Sevier Memorial Association.

All activities take place at the Marble Springs State Historic Site: 1220 West Governor John Sevier Highway.

About Marble Springs State Historic Site

Marble Springs State Historic Site is the last remaining home of John Sevier. Born in Virginia in 1745, John Sevier made a name for himself as a Revolutionary War Hero during the Battle of Kings Mountain (1780), a key player; Governor of the short-lived State of Franklin (1784-1788), and ultimately was elected to serve as the first Governor of the State of Tennessee (1796). Marble Springs was the approximate 350-acre farm that Sevier lived on from 1801-1815, the last years of his life. Sevier named his farm Marble Springs because of the Tennessee Rose Marble that was quarried on site and the natural springs that flowed on the property.


Lecture highlights radio history

(Knoxville, TN) For decades, Julian Burke has collected unique pieces of broadcasting equipment, including the original announcer microphones from WNOX, the legendary Knoxville radio station known as the “Cradle of Country Music.” In a Brown Bag Lecture on Wednesday, September 14, 2016, at noon, Burke will share early history and artifacts from WNOX’s studio.

The lecture is held in conjunction with the exhibition, Come to Make Records: Knoxville’s Contributions to American Popular Music, on display at the Museum of East Tennessee History through October 30. The exhibit examines the 1929 and 1930 Brunswick Records’ Vocalion label’s recordings that took place at the St. James Hotel in downtown Knoxville and invited locals to come make records. These old-time, jazz, blues, and gospel recordings added Knoxville’s voice to American popular music and inspired the next generation of country music stars. The exhibition features an array of artifacts, videos, sound recordings, and photographs showcasing East Tennessee’s diverse musical heritage and the importance of WNOX Radio.

Julian Burke is recognized locally as one of the foremost experts on old televisions and radios. He has been a lifelong lover of electronics and started collecting old radios by going door to door at age 7, and he hasn’t stopped since. By 13, he was repairing radios and televisions around Knoxville.

The program is sponsored by Consolidated Nuclear Security, LLC, and is and free and open to the public. The lecture will begin at noon at the East Tennessee History Center, 601 S. Gay Street, Knoxville. Guests are invited to bring a “Brown Bag” lunch and enjoy the lecture. Soft drinks will be available.

For more information on the lecture, exhibitions, or museum hours, call 865-215-8824 or visit the website at www.EastTNHistory.org.


Marble Springs hosts Living History

KNOXVILLE, TN – Marble Springs State Historic Site will host a weekend of Living History in celebration of the life and times of the first governor of Tennessee, John Sevier, in commemoration of his 271st birthday.

John Sevier Days Living History Weekend will take place Saturday, September 17, 2016 from 10:00 AM– 5:00 PM and Sunday, September 18, from 11:00 – 4:00 PM. You can expect to enjoy 18th century demonstrations such as open-hearth cooking, spinning and weaving, blacksmithing, weapons demonstrations that will showcase period-appropriate firearms, 18th century style militia drills, regional craft demonstrations, historic lecture, hands on archeology activities, and more. Food, drinks, and special treats will be available. Details are subject to change.

Admission for Sevier Days is $5.00 per adult (16+); $3 per child (7-15); 6 and under FREE; Parking is free. All proceeds benefit the mission of preservation and education of the Marble Springs State Historic Site.

Programming assistance for this event is provided by Knox County. Marble Springs is funded under an agreement with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Tennessee Historical Commission, and supplemented by additional funds raised by the Governor John Sevier Memorial Association.

Marble Springs State Historic Site is located at 1220 West Governor John Sevier Highway, Knoxville, TN, 37920.

Marble Springs State Historic Site is the last remaining home of John Sevier. Born in Virginia in 1745, John Sevier made a name for himself as a Revolutionary War Hero during the Battle of Kings Mountain (1780), a key player and Governor of the short-lived State of Franklin (1784-1788), and ultimately was elected to serve as the first Governor of the State of Tennessee (1796).

For more information call (865)573-5508.


Museum hosts antique sale

On Friday and Saturday, September 9-10, 2016, the Museum of Appalachia will celebrate its 5th annual “Days of the Pioneer” Antique Show. This two-day event features the finest selection of 18th and 19th century antiques from over 60 of the nation’s preeminent dealers.

Museum President Elaine Meyer says, “With the 65-acre Museum of Appalachia as a backdrop, attendees can tour the Museum and see thousands of early American artifacts in their natural setting, and then have the opportunity to purchase similar items from some of the best antique dealers in the country.”

Held on the grounds of the Museum of Appalachia, the event also features mountain music, Revolutionary and Civil War encampments, and traditional craftsmen demonstrating pioneer skills. Guests will enjoy activities such as sawmilling, blacksmithing, sorghum making, spinning, weaving, and more.

Admission to the Antique Show includes a tour of the Museum mountain farm and village, which contains some three-dozen historic log structures, exhibit halls filled with thousands of Appalachian artifacts, gardens, and free-range farm animals.

Advance tickets are available at a discount through August 22nd. Tickets can be purchased online at www.museumofappalachia.org, by phone, or in-person. This event is free for Museum Members.

The Museum is located 16 miles north of Knoxville, one mile east of I-75 at Exit 122. For more information call (865) 494-7680 or visit the website at www.museumofappalachia.org.

 


Iconic sign gets an upgrade

KNOXVILLE, TN – The Tennessee Theatre will celebrate the return of its iconic vertical sign to Gay Street and the newly refurbished marquee with a free open house and relighting ceremony on Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2016.

“The vertical sign is an important part of downtown Knoxville’s visual identity and our theater’s history,” Tennessee Theatre Executive Director Becky Hancock said. “After more than two months of work, we will welcome back our vertical sign and refurbished marquee, both of which will shine on Gay Street even brighter and better. We look forward to the public joining us for the celebration.”

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During the open house sponsored by McCarty Holsaple McCarty Architects and Interior Designers, the Tennessee Theatre will be open to the public for self-guided tours of the stage and backstage areas from 6-8 p.m. House organist Dr. Bill Snyder will play the Mighty Wurlitzer organ, and a caricature artist will be at the event to draw guests with the iconic Tennessee Theatre marquee.

At 8 p.m., guests will move outside onto Gay Street, which will be closed in front of the theater for the event, for a ceremony featuring Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero, Tennessee Theatre board members and officials from Pattison Sign Group, which handled the project. Elected officials and donors will join Hancock in leading a countdown to the official relighting of the vertical sign and marquee with brighter, more energy-efficient LED light bulbs.

When the marquee project was announced in April, the Tennessee Theatre launched a fundraising campaign to raise $150,000 to cover the cost of the refurbishment. Through cash and in-kind donations, the theater has raised more than $136,000 and is asking for the community’s continued support to completely fund the project.

At the event, guests also will have the opportunity to sponsor a bulb for $25 or purchase several commemorative items, including a hand-crafted vertical sign glass ornament or fine art print of the marquee, to help fund the project. More information on the campaign can be found at www.tennesseetheatre.com/marquee.

The marquee project also was supported by a $65,000 grant from the City of Knoxville, corporate gifts from Pattison Sign Group and Scripps Networks Interactive, and individual donations from the community.

Locally headquartered Pattison Sign Group, one of the largest sign and visual communication companies in the world, donated its services at cost to remove the vertical sign, replace all light bulbs, repair wiring and damage and reaffix the sign to the Burwell Building.

At its facility in South Carolina, Pattison Sign Group divided the four-ton vertical sign into three pieces for accessibility to replace 3,300 light bulbs with energy-efficient LED lighting; install electrical upgrades; repaint the sign; and repair cosmetic damage from daily wear-and-tear and recent hailstorms.

Additionally, the company oversaw repairs on the Tennessee Theatre marquee, which remained in place. Approximately 2,400 light bulbs were replaced, cosmetic damage was repaired, the marquee was repainted and message boards on the marquee were replaced and upgraded.

“The Tennessee Theatre sign is one of the most beloved icons of our region,” said Jeff Allison, sales manager at Pattison Sign Group. “At Pattison, we do work around the world, but this project has been especially meaningful for our employees who live and work in this community. We are pleased to be able to give Knoxville a brighter and more beautiful sign and marquee.”

Pattison Sign Group anticipates that the vertical sign will return to Gay Street about a week before the official relighting and will remain dark until the ceremony. Gay Street will be closed overnight for the sign to be placed back on the Burwell Building, a process expected to take approximately eight hours.

About the Tennessee Theatre

Located in the heart of downtown Knoxville, the Tennessee Theatre opened in 1928 as a movie palace. The Tennessee Theatre is the Official State Theatre of Tennessee and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The Tennessee Theatre is the region’s leading performing arts center with advanced technology, staging and lighting that draws top entertainment to the Knoxville area.

For more information, visit www.tennesseetheatre.com.


East TN History Fair is August 20

The East Tennessee Historical Society is hosting the annual history fair on Saturday, August 20, 2016, in downtown Knoxville. This event is a one-of-a-kind celebration of the region’s history with tours of the city’s historical sites, book signings and artist demonstrations, history-related vendors booths, music performances, film presentations, and more.

SoldiersKnoxvilleHistoryFair

Civil war re-enactors are set to gather at the East Tennessee History Fair in downtown Knoxville on August 20, 2016, giving attendees a chance to learn about local, regional, and national historical events related to Tennessee. File photo by Celebrate Knoxville.

Attendees to this year’s history fair may walk the East Tennessee Timeline, replete with re-enactors interpreting time periods from early settlement to the Vietnam War; participate in hands-on activities that keep cherished crafts alive; board a bus and tour Knoxville’s historic homes.

The Museum of East Tennessee History on Gay Street will offer free admission to the facility’s current exhibits: Signature Exhibit – Voices of the Land: The People of East Tennessee, and Feature Exhibit – Come to Make Records: Knoxville’s Contributions to American Popular Music.

New this year will be twenty of East Tennessee’s best antiques dealers set up on Market Street behind the History Center with a sampling of quality items. Participating Dealers include Malcolm Rogers, Barbara Elder McDonald, Natural Connections Antiques, Clay Good, Tony Lewis, J. R. Cartwright Antiques, The Lion & The Lamb, Russell Kear, Pat Cardwell and Monty Young.

Some artists scheduled to demonstrate their work include:

Jacki & Janis Proffitt – Woodworking
Gerry Valosik – Dry Needle Felting
Dale Liles & Jenny Bennett – Spinning & Fiber
Fox Hollow Creations – Chair Caning & Basket Weaving
Karen’s Country Critters – Primitive Items Made from Quilts
Serendipity Artist Gallery – Painting, Beaded Jewelry, Scarves
Peter Rose – Raku Pottery
Emma Martin – Leather Bound Journals
Wild Child Clay Works – Clay & Fiber /Natural Dying
Lillian Pearl Designs – Handmade Items & Jewelry
Mark & Nancy Shedden – Spinning & Powder Horns

Other highlights include:

–WDVX and Clayton Country Music Stage featuring Russ and Becky Jeffers, Sarah Morgan, Grassroots Gringos, David West and the Cider Mountain Boys.

–Abraham Lincoln and wife Mary Todd, Mary Anna Custis Lee and Robert E. Lee, General William Tecumseh Sherman, and other historical characters will roam the crowd

–More than fifty historical and genealogical societies representing county, regional, and state organizations from across the region.

For a full list of the event’s activities, visit http://www.easttnhistory.org/

HistoryFair2011

Book vendors and other merchants sell items relating to local, state, and national history at the East Tennessee History Fair. File photo by Celebrate Knoxville.


Ramsey House plans Celtic celebration

KNOXVILLE, TN – On September 3, 2016, Historic Ramsey House, 2614 Thorn Grove Pike, will bring to the community A Gathering of Ancient Sounds; Celtic and Appalachian Rhythms. There will be eight exceptional musical groups offering related but diverse music that represents the best of Celtic and Appalachian music from their beginnings.

“These rhythms will keep your toes tapping and your feet ready for dancing,” said Judy LaRose, Executive Director at Historic Ramsey House.

Food vendors, re-enactors and period demonstrators will be there to provide additional enjoyment for our guests. The Historic Home will be open for tours for $5 per person. Gates open at 9am; the event runs from 10am-6pm; tickets at the gate are $10 for Ramsey House Members, $15 for non-members and children 12 and under free along with free parking.

For more information, call Judy LaRose at 865-546- 0745.


Marble Springs hosts stargazing

Venus and Jupiter are two of the brightest planets visible in the night sky. On the evening of August 27, 2016, Marble Springs State Historic Site will be hosting a Stargazing Workshop to view the conjunction of these two bright planets. The workshop will begin at 9:30pm in the cottage with a video/lecture on Venus and Jupiter before moving to the grounds to view the conjunction. The two planets will be visually very close together, appearing only 0.06 degrees apart. This workshop will conclude at 11:30pm.

Participation in stargazing events is a $1 donation. In the event of inclement weather, the video/lecture portion will still take place. Details are subject to change.

This workshop will take place at Marble Springs State Historic Site at 1220 W. Gov. John Sevier Highway, Knoxville, TN 37920. For more information email info@marblesprings.net or call (865)573-5508.

Programming assistance for this event is provided by Knox County. Marble Springs is funded under an agreement with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Tennessee Historical Commission, and supplemented by additional funds raised by the Governor John Sevier Memorial Association.

About Marble Springs State Historic Site

Marble Springs State Historic Site is the last remaining home of John Sevier. Born in Virginia in 1745, John Sevier made a name for himself as a Revolutionary War Hero during the Battle of Kings Mountain (1780), a key player and Governor of the short-lived State of Franklin (1784-1788), and ultimately was elected to serve as the first Governor of the State of Tennessee (1796).

Marble Springs was the approximate 350-acre farm that Sevier lived on from 1801-1815, the last years of his life. Sevier named his farm Marble Springs because of the Tennessee Rose Marble that was quarried on site and the natural springs that flowed on the property.

While visiting Marble Springs, guests have the opportunity to tour several historic structures that are designed to represent various aspects of John Sevier’s life and times. These structures include: the Tavern, Loom House, Smoke House, Spring House and the John Sevier Cabin and detached kitchen.

For more information, call (865)573-5508.


Emory Place plans Block Party

KNOXVILLE – The second annual Emory Place Block Party in North Knoxville will be held on Saturday, August 20, 2016 from 2 pm to 9 pm. The event has been organized to help bring attention to the historic Emory Place area. The goal of the block party is to create an opportunity for locals to get out and meet one another while experiencing what the area has to offer. The event is free to the public and everyone is welcome to join in the fun.

The 2016 Emory Place Block Party will have a more music centered focus with multiple acts preforming at various venues around Emory Place. All of the acts are Knoxville locals and the music is sure to please with a range including reggae, folk, indie-rock, jazz and more. A full line up, including performances by local dance groups, will be released in the coming weeks.

“Last year we had so many people say they didn’t know Emory Place existed before the block party. The area has seen a great amount of growth in the last year so this year it’s less about discovering Emory Place and more about celebrating it as a special little place in the city,” said block party organizer Whitney Manahan.


Enjoy Shakespeare on the Square

From mid-July to mid-August 2016,  bring a blanket or chair to Market Square in downtown Knoxville and enjoy Shakespeare on the Square. This year will feature The Merry Wives of Windsor and King Lear.

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The Merry Wives of Windsor:
July 14, 16, 22, 24, 28, 30
August 5, 7, 11, 13

Featuring one of Shakespeare’s funniest and most unique characters, the dissolute knight Sir John Falstaff, this play was purportedly written at the command of Queen Elizabeth who demanded that Shakespeare write a play showing “Falstaff in love!” In what may be the original situational comedy, Falstaff attempts to court two women at the same time behind their husbands backs, but the fat knight is no match for our fiery heroines who give him his comeuppance.

King Lear:
July 15, 17, 21, 23, 29, 31
August 4, 6, 12, 14

King Lear of Britain, aging and weary from his years of rule decides to divide his kingdom among his three daughters and lay down the burden of governing. But when his youngest daughter, Cordelia, does not show the obsequiousness he seeks, he grows furious and turns his back on her, dividing her portion between his two older daughters, Regan and Goneril. He slowly realizes – all too late – that love is found in actions, not in words.

Performances begin each night at 7pm and are free. To continue this great tradition, a $10 per person donation is suggested with cash or credit cards accepted each night.

Indoor matinees are also available for a small fee. This year indoor matinees will take place in the luxuriously air conditioned and well appointed Scruffy City Hall at 32 Market Square. Both shows begin at 2:00 p.m. and admission is $15.00 at the door.
July 24: The Merry Wives of Windsor
July 31: King Lear

For more information, contact: (865) 546-4280.


Norse genealogy topic of lecture

In a Brown Bag Lecture on Tuesday, July 26, 2016 local author and genealogist Ron Jones will examine the legacy of the Vikings, including current portrayals, common myths and misunderstandings, the nature of their society, and the extent of their travels. The Vikings are remembered in history as ruthless invaders and plunderers. Yet they also left a legacy of craftsmanship, poetry, superior ships, and seamanship. Who were they, what was their ancestral heritage, and what can modern DNA testing tell us about our Viking ancestry?

A member of the First Families of Tennessee, the Scottish Society of Knoxville, and several Scottish clan societies, Ron Jones is the author of three historical novels and is a frequent speaker about the Civil War, the American Revolution, and the Scots. The Knoxville native is a University of Tennessee graduate, registrar and past president of the Knoxville Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution, and a lifetime member and past commander of the Sons of Confederate Veterans.

The program is sponsored by the Gentry Griffey Funeral Chapel & Crematory and is free and open to the public. The lecture will begin at noon at the East Tennessee History Center, 601 S. Gay Street, Knoxville. Guests are invited to bring a “Brown Bag” lunch and enjoy the lecture. Soft drinks will be available. For more information on the lecture, exhibitions, or museum hours, call 865-215-8824 or visit the website at www.EastTNHistory.org.


History Center hosts First Families reunion

(Knoxville, TN) The East Tennessee Historical Society will commemorate the state’s 220th birthday with a First Families of Tennessee Reunion and Jubilee, August 19-21, 2016. The weekend will include a FFT dinner at Marble Springs, home of Tennessee Governor John Sevier, with period music, dances, and living history presentations, and tours of Marble Springs, with special time set aside for attendees to visit, compare research, and meet up with cousins.

A genealogy conference will focus on records and research methods for the pioneer period, as well as the history of the state’s early settlement, including the Watauga Association, the State of Franklin, county and state records, and more. The conference keynote speaker will be Troy Wayne Poteete, chief justice of the Cherokee Supreme Court, Tahlequah, Oklahoma, who will discuss the experiences of the Cherokee after they reached Oklahoma.

On Sunday, August 21, bus tours will travel to important pioneer sites in upper East Tennessee, such as Sycamore Shoals, Tipton-Haynes House, the site of the Battle of the State of Franklin, and replica of the State of Franklin log cabin capitol in Greeneville.

The First Families of Tennessee Reunion will be held in conjunction with the annual East Tennessee History Fair, which will take place on Saturday. The fair features traditional music, children’s games and activities, vintage films, living history presentations from the Cherokee to the Vietnam War, a History Hound costume competition, free admission to the Museum of East Tennessee History, bus tours to historic sites, and a birthday party for Davy Crockett, complete with cake.

First Families of Tennessee is a family heritage program of the East Tennessee Historical Society, with membership open to anyone who can prove descent from an ancestor who was in Tennessee by statehood in 1796. FFT has almost 16,000 members representing all fifty states and eight foreign countries.

All events are open to the public. Most East Tennessee History Fair activities are free. Pre-registration and a fee are required for participation in First Families of Tennessee events. For more information on the schedule of events, costs, and registration, see www.eastTNhistory.org/FFTReunion.

About the East Tennessee Historical Society

Established in 1834, the East Tennessee Historical Society has been helping East Tennesseans hold on to our unique heritage—recording the events, collecting the artifacts, and saving the stories that comprise the history we all share. The historical society pursues its education mission through publications, lectures, conferences, school programs, museum exhibits, and heritage programs such as the popular First Families of Tennessee and Civil War Families of Tennessee. The East Tennessee History Center houses the staff and programs of the East Tennessee Historical Society, the Museum of East Tennessee History, the Calvin M. McClung Historical Collection, and the Knox County Archives.


McClung displays mate to artifact

KNOXVILLE—A prehistoric Native American statue currently on display in the lobby of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville’s McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture is thought to be the female counterpart to a male figure that was named the Tennessee State Artifact in 2014.

Sellars statue_Sellar Statue

The pair appears to have been made by the same sculptor between A.D. 1250 and 1350, and the two rank among the finest prehistoric sculptures ever found in the United States. Both statues were found in the 1930s at the Sellars farm in Wilson County, Tennessee, and they appeared together for the first time in the Tennessee State Museum’s recent “Ancestors” exhibition. Paired male and female statues are thought to represent founding ancestors of the prehistoric Native American societies of the middle South.

The male statue was sold to UT in 1940 by the tenant farmer. The figure has been featured in several scientific and popular publications, including a 1941 issue of “Time” magazine and as a United States postal stamp celebrating the opening of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in 2004. It has been featured in various museums worldwide, including the 1992 exhibition “Tresors du Nouveau Monde” at the Musees Royaux d’Art et d’Histoire in Brussels, Belgium, and the Art Institute of Chicago’s exhibit “Hero, Hawk, and Open Hand” in 2004 and 2005.

The female statue was sold by the Sellars family to Lillard Yeaman, sheriff of Smith County and an amateur archaeologist, and then to John C. Waggoner Jr. of Carthage, Tennessee. Waggoner has loaned the statue to UT, and the pair will be on display in the lobby of the McClung Museum through the end of the year.

Recognizing the importance of keeping the statue in Tennessee and reuniting it with its male counterpart, Waggoner has offered the museum a purchase option. To reach this end, the museum is now engaged in a fundraising effort.

Exhibits at the McClung Museum showcase the geologic, historical and artistic past of Tennessee, as well as cultures from around the globe.

The McClung Museum is at 1327 Circle Park Drive. Museum admission is free, and the museum’s hours are 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Monday to Saturday and 1–5 p.m. Sundays.


Marble Springs celebrates July 4th

Marble Springs State Historic Site will celebrate the Fourth of July with a “Let Freedom Ring” Bell Ringing ceremony. This event is in collaboration with the General Henry Knox Chapter of the Sons of the Revolution and local reenacting community. This event will take place from 10am until 4pm on July 4th and is free to the public, though donations are appreciated.

Activities will include a bell ringing ceremony, a freedom pole, and a long hunter camp. For more information, please call (865)-573- 5508, email info@marblesprings.net or visit www.marblesprings.net. Details subject to change.

All activities will take place at the Marble Springs State Historic Site at 1220 W. Governor John Sevier Highway, Knoxville, TN 37920.

Programming assistance for this event is provided by Knox County. Marble Springs is funded under an agreement with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Tennessee Historical Commission, and supplemented by additional funds raised by the Governor John Sevier Memorial Association.

Marble Springs State Historic Site is the last remaining home of John Sevier. Born in Virginia in 1745, John Sevier made a name for himself as a Revolutionary War Hero during the Battle of Kings Mountain (1780), a key player and Governor of the short-lived State of Franklin (1784-1788), and ultimately was elected to serve as the first Governor of the State of Tennessee (1796).

Marble Springs was the approximate 350-acre farm that Sevier lived on from 1801-1815, the last years of his life. Sevier named his farm Marble Springs because of the Tennessee Rose Marble that was quarried on site and the natural springs that flowed on the property.

While visiting Marble Springs, you will have the opportunity to tour several historic structures that are designed to represent various aspects of John Sevier’s life. These structures include: the Tavern, Loom House, Smoke House, Spring House, the John Sevier Cabin and detached kitchen.


Mabry-Hazen hosts July 4th event

KNOXVILLE, TN – Mabry-Hazen House will host its Fourth of July Celebration on Monday, July 4th, 2016. On historic Mabry’s Hill attendees will enjoy a great view of the July 4th fireworks show, good food, and live music by Lost Fiddle String Band. Tours of the historic home will begin at 6pm, and dinner will be served at 7:30. Alcohol is BYOB.

Previously voted one of the best places to watch the Boomsday fireworks show, Mabry-Hazen House also offers food and entertainment without the traffic. Tickets are $60 per adult and children under 12 are free when accompanied by a ticket holder. Tickets are limited to 200 adults to ensure a quality event. Purchase your tickets in advance to guarantee your attendance. There is plenty of parking and the site offers easy access to I-40 without traffic concerns.

Tickets may be purchased in advance by visiting www.mabryhazen.com or call 865-522-8661 for more information. The event will take place rain or shine. Tickets are non-refundable. Sponsored by WDVX, All Occasions Party Rentals, and Crowne Plaza Knoxville.

Built in 1858, Mabry-Hazen House is strategically located on the highest hill east of downtown Knoxville with spacious views in all directions. The home was occupied and defended by both armies during the Civil War. It housed three generations of the same family for 130 years, and the museum showcases one of the largest original family collections in America. Your attendance will help support the museum’s mission to preserve and educate the public about an important part of East Tennessee history.

Please call 865-522-8661 or visit www.mabryhazen.com for more information.


Author makes historic trek

Author Jerry Ellis will be speaking about his 900 mile walk along the Cherokee Trail of Tears as guest speaker for the Historic Ramsey House Annual Meeting to be held at the East Tennessee Historic Center, 601 S Gay Street on June 21, 2016 at 5:30pm. Ellis, a graduate of the University of Alabama, became, in 1989 the first person in the modern world to walk the Trail of Tears.

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Jerry Ellis

“I did the walk to honor the Cherokee and to raise awareness about Cherokee history,” said Ellis. “I sold all I owned to finance the life-altering, two month trek. I slept mostly in woods and fields along the Trail, though sometimes kind strangers gave me shelter and a meal for the night.”

Random House nominated Ellis’ resulting book, Walking the Trail, One Man’s Journey Along the Cherokee Trail of Tears, for a Pulitzer Prize and a National Book Award. It has been read by more than 600,000, quoted in Reader’s Digest, and went on display in 2011 at the National Teachers’ Hall of Fame.

A meet and greet and book signing will begin at 5:30 with supper and program to follow at 6:15.

Tickets are $20 for members of Ramsey House and $25 for non members. Reservations can be made at 865-546- 0745 or by email at judy@ramseyhouse.org.

 


Enjoy Jewish traditional foods

KNOXVILLE, TN – You might be familiar with bagels and lox, or challah bread. But what about shakshuka or mandlebrot? On May 22, 2016 the greater Knoxville community will have a chance to try both of these Jewish foods, and many more, at the first-ever “Knoshville” Jewish Food Festival. (The event’s name is a play on the Yiddish word “nosh,” which means to snack or nibble.)

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“Knoshville will bring together every Jewish organization in the Knoxville and Oak Ridge area, in celebration and appreciation of Jewish foods and cuisine. The entire community is invited to attend, nosh with us, and learn about the foods that bring us together,” says Deborah Oleshansky, Executive Director of the Knoxville Jewish Alliance. “It’s going to be very fun, and also very delicious.”

Knoshville Jewish Food Festival
Sunday, May 22 • 11:00AM – 3:00PM
Arnstein Jewish Community Center (AJCC), 6800 Deane Hill Drive
Admission is free; minimum food purchase of $10.00
The entire community is invited to attend and nosh! (RAIN OR SHINE.)

Menu items to include:
Bagels and lox (smoked salmon); Shakshuka (Middle Eastern spicy baked egg dish); Bundt cakes; “black and white” cookies; mandlebrot (it’s like biscotti, but better) potato latkes (pancakes); potato knishes (delicious filling covered with dough and baked or fried); matzah ball soup (dumplings in broth); challah (Jewish egg bread)

Please note: In respect of kashrut, the kosher Jewish dietary laws and traditions, no meat or poultry items will be available at this event. Dairy, fish and vegetarian items and some gluten-free items will be available. The Knoxville Jewish Alliance looks forward to announcing a kosher deli event in Fall 2016. Stay tuned!

Participating organizations: Knoxville Jewish Alliance, Heska Amuna Synagogue, Temple Beth El, Knoxville Jewish Day School, Chabad of Knoxville, Jewish Congregation of Oak Ridge, the local chapters of Hadassah and BBYO, and the Young Jewish Adults of Knoxville.

Knoshville will also feature Israeli dancing, music, and an art gallery. An AJCC pool open house will occur from 1:00PM – 5:00PM; pool use is free to the community.


Kid’s night out at the museum

KNOXVILLE—The McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, will host its first “Night at the McClung Museum” family sleepover from 7 p.m. Friday, June 17, 2016 to 8 a.m. Saturday, June 18.

The sleepover will provide children ages 5 to 11 and their parents the opportunity to spend an unforgettable night with dinosaurs and explore the museum’s new special exhibition, “Dinosaur Discoveries: Ancient Fossils, New Ideas,” on loan from the American Museum of Natural History, which reveals a vivid picture of what living, breathing dinosaurs were really like. The event also will feature family-friendly activities including dino-related crafts, a flashlight tour, games, a movie screening and bedtime stories.

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Tickets are $40 a person for museum members and $50 a person for nonmembers and include all activities and craft supplies, a survival pack with an exclusive event-themed bag, flashlight, evening snacks and supplies, and breakfast Saturday morning. Tickets may be purchased online or over the phone at 865-974-2144. Online ticket purchases will incur an additional processing fee. All children must be age 5 to 11 at the time of the sleepover and must be accompanied by an adult chaperone.

Participants can be dropped off and picked up in front of the museum, or parking passes will be available for $10 for those wishing to park their car overnight.

The McClung Museum is at 1327 Circle Park Drive. Museum admission is free, and the museum’s hours are 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Monday to Saturday and 1–5 p.m. Sundays. Groups may schedule tours by calling 865-974-2144 or emailing museum@utk.edu.

Free two-hour museum parking passes are available from the parking information building at the entrance to Circle Park Drive on weekdays by request. Free parking is available on Circle Park Drive on a first-come, first-served basis on weekends. Free public transportation to the museum is also available via the Knoxville Trolley Vol Line.


Book explores nature of the universe

CELEBRATE KNOXVILLE – It’s National Star Wars Day, and Celebrate Knoxville spent a little time on the phone today with UCLA researcher and astrophysicist Dr. Jeff Zweerink to discuss his recent book, “Whose Afraid of the MultiVerse?” Written in easy-to-read style, with illustrations from popular culture including Star Wars movies, the book explores ideas about space, time, matter, and energy.

Zweerink

CK: Thanks for talking with us on National Star Wars Day, Dr. Zweerink!

JZ: Glad to do it. I didn’t realize that was today.

CK: Is most of your work analyzing data or do you actually get to do experiments with gamma rays?

JZ: About 40 percent of my time is spent on experiments. We’re currently building a balloon that (once we get the funding) we will send out to collect data.

CK: When you talk about The Big Bang in ‘Whose Afraid of the MultiVerse?’, why do you use the word ‘inflation’ and not ‘explosion’ to describe what happened?

JZ: It’s a scientific term to describe the expansion of the fabric of space.

CK: As a layperson, it makes me think that the universe took a breath, like lungs filling up. Doesn’t using the word ‘inflation’ imply that something was sucked in from somewhere else, and what would that substance be?

JZ: I can see what you mean by that. Scientists use this word to describe one possible (scenario) that is like a balloon with dots on it. When the fabric expands, the dots move apart.

CK: On page 14 of your book, you said ‘the only real controversial aspect of the level one model (of the universe) is its spacial extent, or size.’ Are there really scientists out there in California that think the universe has a finite size, like a box, or like the earth is sitting on the back of a tortoise (to use Native American mythology)?

JZ: You can think of the universe as flat, in three dimensions like a piece of paper, but there are other ways to think about it. In a closed model, like the one on page 11 of the book, the universe would be ball-shaped with closed geometry.

CK: In your introduction, you inform the reader that you are a scientist with a Christian world view. Do you think that God placed the planets in such a way that it models sub atomic particles and helps us understand the nature of the unseen?

JZ: I think that there are signs both in the way the universe has been presented and in what we know about quantum physics that reveals the designer, creator, God. Whether they are exact mirrors of each other, I can’t say.

CK: I love how you use illustrations from popular movies like Star Wars, The Matrix, and Back to the Future, to help people understand some of these interesting but complex scientific ideas. Have you ever seen the television series, Lost?

JZ: I have.

CK: Do you think (as an astrophysicist who is also a Christian) that the story is a good example of a shared consciousness, and that we, as believers, are co-creating Heaven, a shared consciousness, with God?

JZ: There are some serious (mainstream Christianity) theological issues with that point of view, especially about the soverignty of God. He doesn’t need our help.

CK: But we do co-create with Him when we pray, right? We make things happen that otherwise might not have happened unless we were involved?

JZ: Yes, we do. That’s an interesting point. Not certain that applies to Heaven, though. Would make some interesting further discussion. When I first became a scientist, I thought that science and faith were enemies. Now I have come to understand that revelations from both science and faith (Scriptural revelation) will inform the other and both will agree.

CK: In your book you said that “Scientists are aware that their equipment selects what data they measure.” How does that relate to changes made by the Observer in quantum physics?

JZ: That’s one of the philosophical questions discussed in the book–in having the point of view as the universe being designed by a Creator to support life, we ourselves are Observer and are working within the realm we’re working to describe. We can’t argue for a universe that does not support life, since we are here and we are alive.

CK: That’s the topic of a new book?

JZ: Yes, my new book is about Exoplanets, planets outside our solar system, exploring questions about the possibility of life out there.

CK: And if there is life out there, Jesus died for them too, and would not have to be born on their planet to (provide spiritual revelation) enlightenment?

JZ: If they are human. Jesus being born as human, the incarnation, is crucial.

CK: But what is human? Scripture says God created man from dirt. And any other planet out there would have dirt of some kind, right? Or are you saying in the case of life not being carbon-based…

JZ: Well now we’re talking about the same kinds of issues with the multiverse, where we have infinite possibilities in infinite time…

CK: And I love how in your book, you say that Marty McFly’s time line where he does not go back into the future still exists!

JZ: If the multiverse exists.

CK: And would you say that if the multiverse does exists, the life, death, resurrection of Christ is the only event that does happen without change, and is central to all other events, which could and would be free to happen any number of ways and still be meaningful?

JK: If the multiverse exists, that would have to be true. You know there is a group that meets in Knoxville that discusses these kinds of questions, and is open to all people interested in science, regardless of world view.

CK: I saw that. We actually have several science-related Meet Up groups in Knoxville. And of course Knoxville is a college town with the University of Tennessee, so there are plenty of opportunities to get involved with scientific studies there too. So fun! For my last question, how can people get a copy of “Whose Afraid of the MultiVerse?” or find out more about your work?

JZ: Send them to the web site, Reasons.org.


Stargazing event offered May 9

Marble Springs State Historic Site will host a stargazing workshop conducted by Gary Noland, adjunct instructor of Astronomy at the University of Tennessee on Monday, May 9, 2016, from 7 a.m. until 2:30 p.m. This workshop will feature the relatively rare astronomical event of Mercury’s transit across the sun. During the transit, Mercury will appear in silhouette as a small, dark dot moving in front of the sun. The last transit of Mercury occurred in 2006 and will not be seen again until 2019.

Guests are welcome to view this rare event through a special telescope provided by Mr. Noland. Proper eye protection is absolutely essential for watching the transit of Mercury, else you risk blindness or eye damage. For all guests planning to stay the duration of the workshop, packing a lunch is recommended.

Programming assistance for this event is provided by Knox County. Marble Springs is funded under an agreement with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Tennessee Historical Commission, and supplemented by additional funds raised by the Governor John Sevier Memorial Association.

All activities take place at Marble Springs State Historic Site: 1220 W. Governor John Sevier Highway, in Knoxville.

Marble Springs State Historic Site is the last remaining home of John Sevier. Born in Virginia in 1745, John Sevier made a name for himself as a Revolutionary War Hero during the Battle of Kings Mountain (1780), a key player and Governor of the short-lived State of Franklin (1784-1788), and ultimately was elected to serve as the first Governor of the State of Tennessee (1796).

This event is free, but donations are appreciated. Details are subject to change. For more information please call (865)573-5508, email info@marblesprings.net, or visit the Marble Springs website at www.marblesprings.net.


TN Theatre to upgrade iconic sign

More than a decade after the creation of the new blade sign and marquee, the Tennessee Theatre is launching a fundraising campaign to refurbish the iconic sign and replace the lighting technology with brighter, energy-efficient bulbs.

“The Tennessee Theatre is one of the most photographed landmarks in the state and holds an emotional attachment for East Tennesseans as a symbol of our region,” Tennessee Theatre Executive Director Becky Hancock said. “As part of our commitment to ensuring the theater remains vibrant and protecting the community’s investment of the grand restoration more than 11 years ago, it is time for us to update the technology for the sign and complete necessary maintenance. We are asking the community for support as we undertake this important project.”

Tennessee Theatre will host a free open house Saturday, April 30, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. with backstage tours and Mighty Wurlitzer organ music. Attendees can purchase merchandise, bulbs and letters to support the campaign and learn more about the history of the iconic blade sign and marquee on Gay Street.

To support the marquee campaign, visit www.tennesseetheatre.com/marquee.

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Located in the heart of downtown Knoxville, the Tennessee Theatre opened in 1928 as a movie palace. The Tennessee Theatre is the Official State Theatre of Tennessee and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The Tennessee Theatre is the region’s leading performing arts center with advanced technology, staging and lighting that draws top entertainment to the Knoxville area.


Fourth & Gill tour offered

Knoxville’s Historic Fourth + Gill Neighborhood hosts its 26th Anniversary Tour of Homes on Sunday, April 24, 2016 from 1-6 p.m. The tour begins at the stately Central United Methodist Church, one of the city’s most beautiful examples of Gothic Revival architecture. Visitors may visit one of Knoxville’s premier historical districts and step inside several neighborhood homes, a condominium inside the recently renovated Brownlow School Lofts, and the prominent Greystone mansion.

This year’s tour showcases the art of six local artists whose work will be displayed on porches throughout the neighborhood. The tour coincides with the Dogwood Arts Open Gardens and Walking Trails that feature four neighborhood gardens and several notable trees.

Maps (which include addresses for the gardens) for the self-guided tour are located inside the special event mailbox on the west side of Luttrell Street, adjacent to the Brownlow School Lofts.

Located less than two miles from downtown Knoxville, the Historic Fourth + Gill Neighborhood features over 280 residential structures including single-family homes, duplexes, and apartment and condominium buildings.

The Fourth + Gill Neighborhood Organization is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization whose purpose is to build and to sustain a vital urban community by protecting and preserving the historic architecture of the area and by promoting a strong sense of community.

Tickets may be purchased on the tour day for $12 (free for children 12 and under) at the Central United Methodist Church (201 Third Avenue) from 1:00-5:00pm.

 


UT sponsors medieval event

KNOXVILLE—The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Marco Institute for Medieval and Renaissance Studies has teamed up with Bearden High School and the Tennessee Medieval Faire to host the Marco Madness Medieval Faire from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, April 2, 2016.

It will be held at Bearden High School, 8352 Kingston Pike, Knoxville. Admission is free and complimentary pizza will be served. Medieval food, drink and crafts will be available for purchase. There also will be door prizes. Parking is free but limited. The fair aims to demonstrate how medieval culture and the humanities shed light on today’s world.

“With the popularity of ‘Game of Thrones,’ ‘Lord of the Rings’, ‘The Hobbit,’ Vikings, pirates, Disney princesses and more, there is so much excitement about everything medieval,” said Thomas E. Burman, director of the UT Marco Institute. “We wanted to provide a gathering where this interest could thrive.”

Visitors are encouraged to come in family-friendly costumes, without masks or real weapons, and compete in costume and trivia contests for prizes.

UT professors and graduate students will lead discussions on “Game of Thrones” and Tolkien’s “Lord of the Rings” and “The Hobbit.”

From 11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m., visitors can learn how to be a street character and audition for the Tennessee Medieval Faire, which will be held in May in Harriman, Tennessee.


Dinosaurs return to Knoxville

Travel back in time 65 million years at “Discover the Dinosaurs” at the Knoxville Convention Center on Saturday and Sunday, April 2-3, 2016.

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Now in its fifth year at the Knoxville Convention Center, the interactive exhibition, “Discover the Dinosaurs,” is an educational family outing featuring 40 museum-quality and animatronic dinosaur replicas. Photo submitted.

“Every year at the Convention Center, thousands of kids attend ‘Discover the Dinosaurs’ with their families to learn and have fun,” General Manager Mary Bogert said. “The exhibition features hands-on attractions and lifelike animatronic replicas that move and roar. Kids feel like they are getting up close to living dinosaurs, and parents like that their children are learning about fossils and the prehistoric era.”

The event also features activities , such as Dino Dig, where children pretend to be archeologists hunting for fossils in sand; Dino Den, where young guests climb and interact with dinosaurs their size; Dino Theater, where educational and entertaining videos are shown; coloring station; mini-golf; inflatables; scavenger hunt with clues hidden throughout the exhibit; and Tyrannosaurus rex and Triceratops rides. Additional activities such as gem and fossil mining and face painting are available for an additional charge.

The exhibit is open Saturday, April 2, from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Sunday, April 3, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.

“Discover the Dinosaurs” tickets are $22 for children, age 2-12; $18 for 13 and up and adults; and $15 for seniors. Children under the age 2 may enjoy the exhibit for free. (Tickets available Convention Center box office the day of the event.)


Photography workshop offered

Marble Springs State Historic Site will host a photography workshop on April 23, 2016 at 11am. This event will take place at the Marble Springs State Historic Site: 1220 West Governor John Sevier Highway, Knoxville.

sevier-homestead

This workshop will be taught by Doug Mills, videographer for the award winning Heartland Series. At this workshop guests will be taking pictures of the scenic historic site while developing some basic photography techniques as well as their own artistic vision.

Cost is $20 per person with all proceeds going towards educational programing at Marble Springs.

For more information or to register please call 865-573-5508 or email info@marblesprings.net.


Scott Miller at Laurel Theater

Jubilee Community Arts presents Scott Miller & the Commonwealth Ladies Auxiliary (Rayna Gellert & Bryn Davies) on Friday, April 15, 2016, at 8 p.m. at the Laurel Theater in downtown Knoxville.

Naturalized Knoxvillian Scott Miller returns to the Laurel Theater as part of a powerful acoustic trio featuring Rayna Gellert and Bryn Davies, following the release of his latest album Big, Big World.

Raised in Virginia’ Shanendoah Valley, where he currently resides, Scott’s genuine interest and identity with the lore of the South and the Civil War, along with his intelligent and take-no-prisoners lyrics, set him apart from other roots rock artists and have propelled him to national and international prominence.

Tickets: $18-20, available at brownpapertickets.com. The Laurel Theater is located on the corner of 16th and Laurel Avenue in the historic Fort Sanders neighborhood of Knoxville near the UT campus. This show is expected to sell out quickly; get tickets now.

ScottMiller1


Free Day at McClung Museum

Families are invited to enjoy free programming throughout the month of February 2016 at UT’s McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture.

The museum will host a free Stroller Tour and activity from 10:00 to 11 a.m. Monday, February 8, 2016. This program will celebrate love around the world in honor of Valentine’s Day.

The tour is free and open to the public, but reservations are necessary and are first-come, first-served. Call 865-974-2144 to make a reservation.

The museum also will host a free Family Fun Day from 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. on Saturday, February 27. The tour and craft activities will celebrate African American History Month and will focus on Tennessee artist William Edmondson (1874–1951)—a well-known sculptor and the first African American artist to have a solo show at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Visitors can participate in tours and will work on a take-home craft.

The McClung Museum is located at 1327 Circle Park Drive. Museum admission is free, and the museum’s hours are 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday to Saturday and 1:00 to 5:00 p.m. on Sundays. Free two-hour museum parking passes are available from the parking kiosk at the entrance to Circle Park Drive during the week. Free parking is available on the weekends.

Free public transportation to the museum is available via the Knoxville Trolley Vol Line.


History awards nominations sought

The East Tennessee Historical Society (ETHS) invites the public for nominations for this year’s Awards of Excellence in the field of history.  These awards recognize individuals and organizations that have made significant contributions to the preservation, promotion, programming, and interpretation of the region’s history.

The deadline for nominations is April 8, 2016.  Winners will be recognized at the Society’s Annual Meeting held on May 3, in Knoxville.

Awards are in four categories:

The Award of Distinction recognizes a special project, such as publications, building preservation, or special program, such as a conference, heritage event, publication, lecture series, or other.

History in the Media Award is presented to someone in the field of television, radio, newspaper, magazine, or Internet, for outstanding contributions to the promotion of our region’s history.

Teaching Excellence Award is for outstanding or innovative teaching of history at any level, grades one through adult education.

The Society’s most prestigious recognition is the Ramsey Award for Lifetime Achievement. This award is reserved for one who, over the course of a lifetime, has made outstanding contributions to the understanding and preservation of East Tennessee history.

To request a nomination form, call 865-215-8824.


McCullough blends art and design

Artist Kate McCullough of Fountain City went back to painting in watercolors 13 years ago after studying art in college and enjoying years in a career in interior design. She says that art and design relate to each other and complement one another, and that probably explains why she enjoyed teaching Feng Shui, the art of arranging a home for the ideal flow of energy.

“The same principles apply in art as they do in interior design,” McCullough told Celebrate Knoxville in a phone interview this morning. “When I returned to school, I immediately fell in love with (how watercolors looked) while taking courses at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. I remember going into the art supplies store and thinking how much I wanted to learn to use watercolors. I can’t really explain what I love about them; I just love how they look.”

Kate McCullough, whose husband Roy is also an artist, says that the couple travel as often as they can and get inspiration on the road.

“We have been around the U.S. and Europe already but we would love to visit Japan and study the art there,” she says. “I am not really a landscape artist but I do enjoy painting urban settings, trains, still life scenes.”

McCullough’s work is among those featured at the upcoming Blount County Public Library’s Knoxville Watercolor Society art exhibit, February 1 through February 29, 2016.

“I joined the Knoxville Watercolor Society in 2009 and found the organization to be very useful to me as an artist,” she says. “They have five or six shows per year that members get to participate in plus I enjoy sharing and learning from other artists in the group. After the show in Blount County, we have shows scheduled in Knoxville at The Emporium and at the Knoxville Museum of Art.”

tennesseegold

Tennessee Gold, watercolor by Fountain City artist Kate McCullough. 

McCullough says the above watercolor painting “Tennessee Gold” was from a photo she took of a shelf in Downtown Wine and Spirits, a business located in downtown Knoxville on Gay Street.

“I asked if I could take some photos in their store, and they said yes,” she says. “The painting of the moonshine jars is a favorite among fans of my work and I think that is because it speaks so much of the history of this area.”

McCullough’s work was featured in last year’s juried exhibition, Artclamation! at the Lighthouse Events Center. She is also a member of the Art Market Gallery, The Tennessee Watercolor Society and Fountain City Art Guild. She teaches painting classes at the Fountain City Art Center on a regular basis.

For more information, visit the artist web site at http://www.katemcculloughwaterart.com/

Regular hours for the Blount County Public Library exhibit of the Knoxville Watercolor Society is Monday through Thursday, 9 am to 9 pm, and Friday through Saturday, 9 am to 5:30 pm. Sunday the library is open from 1 pm to 5:30 pm.

The Blount County Public Library is located at 508 North Cusick Street, in Maryville.

 

 


Knoxville gallery features Jewish art

KNOXVILLE, TN – The grand re-opening of Knoxville’s Schwarzbart Gallery opening will be held Sunday, January 31, 2016, at 6800 Deane Hill Drive, from 3 to 5pm. This is a free event, open to the community and members of all faiths. Hors d’oeuvres and a celebratory champagne toast will be served.

Generations of Knoxville’s Jews have used the Arnstein Jewish Community Center (AJCC) as a social and cultural gathering place. Since 1929, its mission has remained: To serve the spiritual, social, and educational needs of all Knoxville Jews.

Recently, the Knoxville Jewish Alliance (KJA) launched a campaign to update and improve the AJCC facility, making it more accessible to those with mobility limitations, in addition to completing some long overdue cosmetic updates.

The Schwarzbart Gallery – a permanent tribute to Judaic artisan Arnold’s Schwarzbart’s works – represents the anchor of the first phase of these updates, to be enjoyed by the entire community.

“I can think of no better way to begin our AJCC renewal and improvement process than with the installation of the Schwarzbart Gallery,” said Adam Brown, KJA President. Given how much Arnold cared about our community, combined with the fact that he was so highly regarded in his field as a Judaic artist, I feel this gallery is a perfect opportunity to recognize an outstanding individual who truly enriched our lives through his generosity, his art, and his love for our Jewish community.”

shtender

Arnold Schwarzbart’s works can now be found in Jewish homes and institutions throughout the world, are current and modern (reflecting his architectural training) while they also invoke feelings of an ancient history and shared past. (Image: The Shtender, by Arnold Schwarzbart, submitted.)


Ramsey House plans holiday events

Historic Ramsey House will hold its Annual Candlelight Tour on Sunday, December 13, 2015 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Enjoy holiday treats, Christmas carols, and tours of the beautifully decorated, historic home. Admission is free, but donations are appreciated.

The annual Ramsey House wreath workshop will be held on Saturday, December 12, 2015 starting at 12:30 p.m. with refreshments; instruction begins at 1 p.m. Attendees need to bring a pair of small garden shears and garden gloves. Every year Julia Shiflett and her “wreath elves” pick the finest fresh greens and holly berries, tie beautiful bows, and find the most fragrant cloves and oranges for participants to make a beautiful holiday wreath and pomander.The cost of the workshop is $35 per person. For more information or reservations, call Historic Ramsey House at 865-546-0745.

Christmas Dinner with the Ramsey’s will be held December 4-8 starting at 6:30 p.m. each night. Each evening will feature a candlelight tour of the beautifully decorated home and lovely holiday dinner prepared by Rosa’s Catering. The dinner will be held in the 1797 home of Francis Alexander Ramsey, his wife Peggy, and their children. This is a great opportunity to entertain the special people in your life, employees, or clients. Seating for a total of twenty guests in the dining room and the parlor is available each evening, and individual ticket purchases are also welcome. All proceeds go directly to Historic Ramsey House. Reservations are a must and will be taken on a first-come, first-serve basis. Tickets are $125 per person ($100 of the cost is a tax-deductible donation). For more information or reservations, call Historic Ramsey House at 865-546-0745.


McClung Museum hosts holiday sale

Knoxville’s McClung Museum will hold its annual sale Nov. 3–10, 2015. Shoppers will find savings on fall and holiday items, books, and toys. New items from local artists including handmade wooden pens, unique jewelry, prints and pottery also will be available.

Proceeds from the sale support the McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture’s educational programs, which reach thousands of university and K-12 students in the East Tennessee region each year.

Sale items will be available while supplies last. Some exclusions will apply.

The McClung Museum and the Museum Store are open 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 1–5 p.m. Sundays.

Complimentary parking is available in front of the museum on Circle Park Drive on a first come, first served basis.

Free public transportation to the museum is available via the Knoxville Trolley Vol Line.


4th & Gill hosts ARToberfest

The Historic Fourth and Gill neighborhood in Knoxville hosts the 2nd Annual ARToberfest from 2-9pm on Saturday, October 24, 2015. The celebration takes place on Morgan Street, between Gratz Street and Third Avenue near Central United Methodist Church.

An ever-expanding event for the whole family, ARToberfest festivities include a showcase featuring over 50 art vendors, live music by the Knoxville Polka Kings, Misty Mountain String Band, and Uptown Stomp, artistry by the Cattywampus puppets, a chalk walk, geocaching, and the Tennessee at Alabama game on the big screen. The standard fare is brats (meat and vegetarian), beer, wine, and non-alcoholic beverage options.

Tickets cost only $10, and an advanced ticket purchase comes with one free beverage of choice; kids 12 years old and under are admitted free of charge.

Located less than two miles from downtown Knoxville, the Historic Fourth and Gill neighborhood features over 280 residential structures, including single-family homes, duplexes, and apartment and condominium buildings.

Visit www.artoberfestknox.com.


Fossil Day at McClung Museum

KNOXVILLE—In celebration of International Archaeology Day and National Fossil Day, the McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture hosts a free and family friendly event with activities about archaeology and fossils. The event will be held on Sunday, October 11, 2015 from 1:30 to 5:00 p.m. at the museum.

University of Tennessee archaeologists, paleontologists, and geologists and their graduate students will host displays about their projects locally and around the world. They will be on hand to talk with visitors about their work and offer hands-on activities demonstrating their research. Visitors can also bring artifacts, rocks, and fossils to the museum for identification by experts.

The event will also have a number of activities for children, including make-and-take Roman-style shield decorating, writing names in Egyptian hieroglyphs, identifying plant remains in sandboxes, matching animal bones, and making Roman “coins”. Additionally there will be short, interactive presentations for adults and children about caves, fossil crocodiles, a day in the life of a Roman soldier, and exploring Mars.

All activities are free and open to the public, and reservations are not required.

The museum is located at 1327 Circle Park Drive on the University of Tennessee campus. The museum is open Monday through Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and Sundays from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Parking passes are not needed on the weekends.

 


Marble City presents Ghosts

Marble City Opera will present Ghosts of Crosstown by librettist Jerre Dye at Scruffy City Hall in Knoxville, Tennessee at 7:30pm on October 29, 2015, during National Opera Week.

This production will feature some of Knoxville’s favorite talent including bass-baritone, Brandon J. Gibson who will be singing a powerful opera from the cycle entitled Movin’ Up.

Ghosts of Crosstown is a cycle of four monodramas inspired by the 1927 Art Deco architecture of the Sears Crosstown Building in Memphis, Tennessee, and the ordinary lives of the people who worked and shopped there.

The librettist, Jerre Dye is the same for all pieces with different up and coming composers for each story.

Tickets are $20 for General admission, and $10 for students. Tickets can be purchased at the door on the night of the performance. Bar service will be offered before, during, and after the performance for all attendees.

Scruffy City Hall is located at 32 Market Square in downtown Knoxville.

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Fire and Fright at Ramsey House

Bring your blanket or stadium chair, favorite roasting stick and join the staff of the historic Ramsey House in Knoxville for a very special October 2015 event, Fire and Fright. This event will kick off the Halloween season with the telling of ghost stories around a roaring bonfire. There will be hot dogs to roast and s’mores to enjoy for all in attendance. Pellissippi Community College students will be writing original ghost tales as an English project and will share them with attendees.

The Ramsey House Fire and Fright takes place Saturday October 10, from 7:30-9:30 pm.

Admission is $10 for adults, children 12 and under free. Admission includes a hot dog, beverage and s’mores package for all attendees including children.

Also known as Swan Pond, Ramsey House was constructed circa 1797 by English architect Thomas Hope for Colonel Francis Alexander Ramsey (1764–1820), whose family operated a plantation at the site until the U.S. Civil War. In 1969, the house was added to the National Register of Historic Places for its architecture and its role in the region’s early 19th-century history.

Historic Ramsey House is located at 2614 Thorngrove Pike, Knoxville.

For more information, call (865) 546-0745.

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Parkridge home tour is October 25

The Historic Parkridge Neighborhood will be hosting a 1945-Era Home Tour on Sunday, October 25, 2015 from 1:00-6:00 p.m. Present-day Parkridge encompasses the early Edgewood subdivision which contains many houses built by George Barber, a 19th-century, Victorian house architect. This tour features a variety of homes with a focus on occupants during the Swing era, immediately after WWII. Learn about this history as you tour 8 open houses and 3 homes in the Park Place condominiums. Additionally, WWII living historians will help set the ambiance. Park Place will open up the condos and Swing Dancing with period music will be offered in their gymnasium at 6pm, following the main portion of the home tour. Ticket holders may participate in the dancing at no additional cost.

The homes will span the eras from the 1890’s to the 1945, and are good examples of the ongoing revitalization of the neighborhood. In addition, a walking tour of 20 homes not open to the public will be included. The walking tour will focus on the history of the homes and their former occupants in 1945.

Tickets are $10 per person if purchased in advance and $12 on the day of the event. Children under 12 are admitted for free. Parking is available at the Ashley Nicole Park, 620 Winona Street, 37917. Tickets may be purchased in advance at K-Brew, Saw Works Brewery, Three Rivers Market, or until 4 pm the day of the tour at Ashley Nicole Park. Walking is necessary and many houses have steps. Parkridge is a bike-able neighborhood and tour-goers are welcome to ride bicycles.
For more information call 865-951-6614.

History of Historic Parkridge

Parkridge is an urban neighborhood built mostly from the 1880s to the 1930s. The houses are close together, with sidewalks connecting its residences to major roadways and businesses. The neighborhood is less than 2 miles from downtown Knoxville. Parkridge has gained notoriety for having the largest concentration of George Barber homes in the nation. This area has been known as part of Park City to residents and former residents for over 100 years. Today the Park City Historic District is on the National Register of Historic Places, and the Edgewood Park section, with its concentration of Barber-design houses, has historic overlay protection.


Free presentation on Jackie Kennedy

The East Tennessee Historical Society and the Bijou Theatre in Knoxville will commemorate the 55th anniversary of the John and Jackie Kennedy’s 1960 presidential campaign visit on Monday, September 21, 2015 at 6:30 p.m.

Tina Santi Flaherty, author of What Jackie Taught Us: Lessons From the Remarkable Life of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, will give a presentation on the public and private life of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis–her glamour and style, men and marriages, motherhood, vision, and courage.

The Tennessee Archive of Moving Image and Sound will also show vintage film clips of past presidential visits to Knoxville.

The event is free and open to the public.

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Tina Santi Flaherty is the author of What Jackie Taught Us: Lessons from the Remarkable Life of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis. The Memphis native arrived in New York with $100 in her pocket and not knowing a soul and went on to become the first female corporate vice president of three of America’s largest corporations: Colgate-Palmolive, Gray Advertising, and GTE (now Verizon), earning her a Business Week recognition as One of America’s top corporate executives.

Her many awards and honors include an honorary doctorate from St. John’s University, an Equal People Award from the United Nations Decade for Women, and an Extraordinary Woman of Achievement Award from the National Conference of Christians and Jews.

Ms. Flaherty’s books will be available for purchase and signing following the lecture.


Event raises funds for historic Knoxville

The Historic Homes of Knoxville are pleased to invite the public to a luncheon on Thursday, October 1, 2015, at 11:30 AM at The Foundry to celebrate the founding of the City of Knoxville 224 years ago. Knoxville’s key leaders will come together to celebrate and promote the city and its most precious properties, including Blount Mansion, Crescent Bend, Ramsey House, James White’s Fort, Mabry-Hazen, Marble Springs State Historic Site, and Historic Westwood.

Tennessee Department of Tourist Development commissioner Kevin Triplett will be the featured speaker. Triplett, was appointed to Gov. Bill Haslam’s cabinet as commissioner of the Department of Tourist Development in March of 2015. Triplett, 49, was most recently vice president of public affairs for Bristol Motor Speedway. Prior to joining BMS in 2005, he worked in various roles for NASCAR, ultimately serving as managing director of business operations, guiding the operation and administration of NASCAR’s Sprint Cup Series, Nationwide Series, and Camping World Truck Series. He has twice been named one of NASCAR’s “25 Most Influential” by The Charlotte Observer.

Proceeds from the luncheon will benefit the Historic Homes. Purchase tickets by calling 865-523-7543 by September 24.


Knoxville hosts preservation conference

The annual East Tennessee Preservation Conference will be held in Knoxville on October 22-24, 2015. This popular event emphasizes finding solutions for securing the future of historic places while capitalizing on cultural heritage.

Primary sessions will be held at the East Tennessee History Center and the conference will include an opening reception and hands-on workshops at Historic Westwood. This year’s keynote speaker and special guest will be Donovan Rypkema from Washington, DC, recognized as an industry leader in the economics of preserving historic structures.

The Tennessee Historical Commission will be providing specialized training for Certified Local Government and Historic Zoning Commission members and AIA continuing education credits will once again be offered.

A variety of walking tours to sites in downtown Knoxville will be available.

Register for the conference by calling 865-523-8008.

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The city of Knoxville and East Tennessee offer a wealth of historic buildings and cultural opportunities for residents and visitors alike. Photo of downtown Knoxville in the early 1900s courtesy the East Tennessee Historical Society.

 


Knoxville hosts history fair

The 8th Annual East Tennessee History Fair takes place at the East Tennessee History Center and several downtown Knoxville locations from 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m., August 15, 2015.

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Historical re-enactors are a familiar site at the East Tennessee History Fair in downtown Knoxville. Here, a Civil War doctor explains surgical procedures at a booth display of authentic historical instruments.  File photo by Celebrate Knoxville.

Activities include a living history timeline, live music, historic crafts demonstrations, historical and genealogical groups from across the region, children’s crafts and activities, Davy Crockett’s birthday party, walking tours of downtown, Civil War bus tours and tours of Knoxville’s historic homes, tours of underground Gay Street, “History Hound” dog costume contest, free museum admission, Smoky Mountain film festival at the Tennessee Theatre, vintage baseball games at World’s Fair Park, art exhibits, miniature battles, traditional foods, book sales, and farmers market.

This event is free and open to the public.

The East Tennessee History Center is located at 601 S. Gay Street.


Boomsday at Mabry-Hazen House

KNOXVILLE – Mabry-Hazen House will host its 8th annual Boomsday, Bluegrass, and Barbeque celebration on Sunday, September 6, 2015. On a cool hilltop setting attendees will enjoy a great view of Knoxville’s premiere fireworks show, good food, and live music.

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Tours of the Mabry-Hazen House on Boomsday will begin on September 6, 2015 at 6pm, and dinner will be served at 7:30. Alcohol is BYOB. A new addition this year will be a silent auction offering a variety of fun and exciting items. Photo by John Becker.

Voted one of the best places to watch the Boomsday fireworks show, Mabry-Hazen House also offers food and entertainment without the traffic. Tickets are $60 per adult and children under 12 are free when accompanied by a ticket holder.

Tickets are limited to 200 adults to ensure a quality event. This event has sold out for the past five years. Purchase your tickets in advance to guarantee your attendance. There is plenty of parking and the site offers easy access to I-40 without traffic concerns. Tickets may be purchased in advance by visiting www.mabryhazen.com or call 865-522-8661 for more information.

The event will take place rain or shine. Tickets are non-refundable. Sponsored by WDVX, All Occasions Party Rentals, and Crowne Plaza Knoxville.

Built in 1858, Mabry-Hazen House is strategically located on the highest hill east of downtown Knoxville with spacious views in all directions. The home was occupied and defended by both armies during the Civil War. It housed three generations of the same family for 130 years; the museum showcases one of the largest original family collections in America.


Dinosaurs return to Knoxville

The Knoxville Convention Center once again is inviting families, young people and adults to travel back in time 65 million years at “Discover the Dinosaurs” on Saturday and Sunday, July 18-19, 2015.

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Now in its fourth year at the Convention Center, the interactive exhibition, “Discover the Dinosaurs,” is an educational family outing featuring 40 museum-quality and animatronic dinosaur replicas. In the exhibit’s first three years, more than 43,000 children and adults have attended the attraction. Photo submitted.

“Discover the Dinosaurs,” produced by Blue Star Media, is designed to provide children and adults with a unique and educational way to explore prehistoric life. The exhibit allows visitors to get close and even touch the replicas. The backdrops are custom-designed to reflect the landscapes of the Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous periods.

Several of the dinosaurs are controlled with interactive animatronic buttons that allow children to control the dinosaur’s movements and sounds. The non-moving dinosaurs are able to be touched. The dinosaur replicas are proportionally sized to scale.

The event also features activities, such as Dino Dig, where children pretend to be archeologists hunting for fossils in sand; Dino Den, where young guests climb and interact with dinosaurs their size; Dino Theater, where educational and entertaining videos are shown; coloring station; and scavenger hunt with clues hidden throughout the exhibit.

Tyrannosaurus rex and Triceratops rides, mini-golf and inflatables are available for an additional charge.

The exhibit is open Saturday, July 18, from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., and Sunday, July 19, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.

For tickets, visit http://www.discoverthedinosaurs.com.


Film fest features local history

The Smoky Mountain Film Festival, a presentation of East Tennessee home movies, television footage and classic advertising, takes place this year on August 15, 2015, from noon to 5 p.m. at the Tennessee Theatre.

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The event takes place in partnership with the East Tennessee Historical Society’s annual History Fair and Historic Tennessee Theatre and is sponsored by the Knox County Public Library System.

Tennessee Archive of Moving Image and Sound (TAMIS) will show rare home movies from the Thompson Brothers and Jack Huff collections along with outtakes from WBIR’s Heartland Series and other short films from the early days of Great Smoky Mountains National Park movement.

All films will be accompanied by live music, are free and open to the public.

For more information, please email TAMIS at tamis@knoxlib.org.


PBS film highlights state history

The “Tennesseans: A Volunteer Legacy” will premier July 4, 2015 on East Tennessee PBS. The hour-long film is the first documentary to highlight the events, men and women that earned the state its nickname from the Revolutionary War Battle of Kings Mountain to the modern battlefields of today.

It was shot on location across the country featuring nationally recognized military historians, rare films and photographs that tell a story few know about the state’s military legacy.

“We’re so excited to air this incredible film,” said East Tennessee PBS CEO Vickie Lawson. “It truly provides a never-before-seen glimpse into the lives of the individuals who helped shape our state’s history.”

Funded through a partnership between First Tennessee Bank, Ed Hooper, and Rowland Pictures of Knoxville, this bicentennial story is one of a kind. Hooper had recently premiered his previous film, “Medal of Honor: The History,” when he began searching for an underwriter to fund The Tennesseans.

“Tennessee more or less defined the citizen-soldier in U.S. history and the stories of these men and women need to be preserved,” said Hooper.

Hooper said he went to the sources to make this film possible, including The Department of Defense who “graciously gave access and permission to their people and resources.” He also “ran down private collectors, descendants, national historians, etc.” through a statewide effort from Elizabethton to Memphis.

As any good filmmaker would, Hooper found himself sad to leave even a single story on the cutting room floor.

“I hated what was left on the cutting room floor because you can’t tell all the stories in the time we had,” he said. “The story behind the “Volunteer” nickname is one of the most remarkable legacies in the nation.”

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Admiral Farragut appears in the upcoming PBS hour-long documentary to highlight the events, men and women that earned the state its nickname from the Revolutionary War Battle of Kings Mountain to the modern battlefields of today. Photo submitted.


Celebrate July 4th at Marble Springs

The public is invited as Marble Springs State Historic Site celebrates the Fourth of July 2015. Activities include a “Let Freedom Ring” bell ringing ceremony at 2 p.m., Revolutionary War Stories, and a Raising of a Liberty Pole. This event is in collaboration with the General Henry Knox Chapter Sons of the Revolution and local reenacting community.

This event will take place from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. on July 4 and is free to the public, though donations are appreciated.

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All Fourth of July 2015 activities take place at the Marble Springs State Historic Site: 1220 West Governor John Sevier Highway, in Knoxville. Photo courtesy Marble Springs Historic Site.

Programming assistance for this event is provided by Knox County. Marble Springs is funded under an agreement with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Tennessee Historical Commission, and supplemented by additional funds raised by the Governor John Sevier Memorial Association.

Information found at 865-573-5508.

 


Highlands benefits Knox Heritage

To commemorate the Highlands Grill’s 5th Anniversary, Tom Weiss is hosting an elegant dinner party in support of historic preservation. The event takes place June 17, 2015, and all proceeds will support the Knox Heritage J. Allen Smith Endangered Properties Fund used to save threatened historic places across the region. Live jazz, delicious food and wine pairings will create a special evening to remember.

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Menu

Starter: Lump Blue Crab Cake, Fried Green Tomato Jalapeño Pepper Jelly, Remoulade

Salad: Tuscan Kale and Romaine Caesar with Cornbread Crouton, Kalamata Olives, Asiago Dressing OR Wedge of Iceberg with Highland’s Bleu Dressing, Blistered Tomatoes, Benton’s Bacon, Shaved Red Onion, Walnut Pesto

Entrée: Grilled 8oz Bison Center Cut New York Strip Prepared Medium Rare with Highland’s Potato Gratin, Haricots Verts, White Truffle Butter, Roasted Wild Mushrooms OR Pan Roasted Red Grouper with Lobster Creole Sauce, Smoked Gouda Grits, Sweet Corn & Okra Maque Choux

Dessert: Bourbon Pecan Pie with Crème Anglaise OR Strawberry Shortcake

Wine pairings will be featured with each course courtesy of Constellation Brands.

The Grill at Highlands is located at 4705 Old Kingston Pike. Cost is $100 per person.

For more details and to reserve your place, please contact Mickey Mallonee at mickey@knoxheritage.org or 865.523.8008.


Great views from hiking House Mtn

By Laura Long/CelebrateKnoxville.com. If you’re looking for a great place to enjoy Springtime in East Tennessee, you’ll want to hike House Mountain, a 500-acre natural area located in Knox County approximately eight miles from Knoxville.

The hiking trails are short, but steep, challenging, and rewarding. The 2,100-foot crest of House Mountain provides great views of the Unakas and Cumberlands some 30 miles away, or northeast to the adjacent Clinch Mountain.

According to Knox County’s Department of Parks and Recreation, before erosion by Big Flat Creek, “the gently dipping bedrock layers underlying House Mountain once extended to Clinch Mountain, whose base lies approximately two and half miles to the northeast. The bedrock structure represents a large synclinal fold that formed during the Appalachian mountain building event called the Alleghenian Orogeny.”

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The western trail of House Mountain to the crest is .8 miles and the eastern trail is 1.5 miles. The western trail is narrow, steep, and has a few turns that require careful negotiating. Both trails are connected at the top by the wider Crest Trail that is 1.5 miles long. Photo by Laura Long/Celebrate Knoxville.

Many hikers bring their dogs with them on the trail. From time to time, a courteous wait is needed to allow hikers coming down and hikers going up enough room to pass one another.

In a few places, the great sandstone boulders serve as resting places or picnic spots for hikers or artists sketching the chestnut oaks and mountain pines. Photographers are often seen kneeling in the moist dirt by streambeds to catch a close-up. The north-facing slopes support a forest of sugar maple, tulip poplar, ash, and buckeye.

Don’t forget the binoculars: House Mountain is also a favorite place for birdwatchers. Migrating hawks and warblers can be observed from the mountain. Ruffed grouse, pileated woodpeckers, scarlet tanagers, wild turkeys, and more than one hundred additional species of birds have been observed on the mountain.

Gurgling from the cool streams provide a musical backdrop for hikers making their way up the slopes. House Mountain is drained by several unnamed tributaries of Roseberry Creek and by Hogskin and Brice Branches, which divide it from the 1,500 feet high McAnnally Ridge, which lies to the east and south.

To get to House Mountain from Knoxville, Tennessee, take I-40 East. Exit on U.S. Highway 11W (Rutledge Pike) and go north and east on Rutledge Pike. After about 10 miles, look for the “House Mountain State Park” sign on the right side of the highway and then turn left on Idumea Road. Turn left on Hogskin Road. The parking area is less than a mile on the right. Restrooms are available next to the parking lot. There is no admission fee to hike the trails.

Benches and signage along the trails are provided in memory of John Evans, a Scout leader and founding member/active volunteer for Friends of House Mountain. Enjoy the trails and remember to Leave No Trace.

–Laura Long/CelebrateKnoxville.com


Statehood Day at Blount Mansion

KNOX COUNTY – Celebrating the pioneers who settled and transformed the southwest territory into the vibrant state of Tennessee, the Blount Mansion Association will be hosting its annual Statehood Day on Friday, May 29, 2015 from 6:30-9 p.m. in the Blount Mansion garden, which has been maintained by the Knoxville Garden Club for 81 years.

Additionally, there will be a chance to see the newest exhibit in the Visitors Center. The exhibit is an in depth look at the evolution of the houses and neighborhood from the time Governor Blount first built here in 1792 until today.

A cocktail dinner will be served by Holly’s Eventful Catering, and there will be an open bar available.

Knox County’s only National Historic Landmark and oldest house museum, the Blount Mansion is considered the birthplace of Tennessee, and it was built by William Blount who came to Knoxville to be Governor of the Territory South of the River Ohio. Under Blount’s leadership efforts were made to organize the Territory into the 16 Constitution may have been drafted in the Governor’s office here on the historic Blount Mansion property. It is owned and operated by the Blount Mansion Association, Inc., a nonprofit, educational organization.

Reservations can be made by phone at (865) 525-2375.


Fourth and Gill tour scheduled

The Historic Fourth and Gill neighborhood in Knoxville will celebrate its 25th Anniversary Tour of Homes on Sunday, April 26, 2015 from 1-6pm. Participants will tour Knoxville’s premier historical districts and step inside several neighborhood homes and two condominiums inside the recently renovated Brownlow School Lofts. The Tour begins at the stately Central United Methodist Church, one of the city’s most beautiful examples of Gothic Revival architecture.

Tour guests can take a leisurely walk through the neighborhood to visit homes, or guests can ride a red trolley bus – with a resident tour guide host – from point to point. Tickets purchased on the Tour day cost $12 (free for children 12 and under) at the Central United Methodist Church (201 Third Avenue) from 1:00-5:00pm.

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The Fourth and Gill tour coincides with the Dogwood Arts Open Gardens and Walking Trails that showcase four neighborhood gardens and notable trees. Maps (which include addresses for the gardens) for the self-guided tour are located inside the special event mailbox on the west side of Luttrell Street, adjacent to the Brownlow School Lofts. Photo of downtown Knoxville dogwood trees by CelebrateKnoxville.com.

Located less than two miles from downtown Knoxville, the Historic Fourth and Gill neighborhood features over 280 residential structures, including single-family homes, duplexes, and apartment and condominium buildings. The Fourth and Gill Neighborhood Organization is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization whose purpose is to build and to sustain a vital urban community by protecting and preserving the historic architecture of the area and by promoting a strong sense of community. Organization contact is PO Box 3845, Knoxville, Tennessee, 37927-3845.


Knoxville historic homes receive award

The Historic Homes of Knoxville were honored by the Tennessee Association of Museums at the recent 2015 TAM Annual Conference held in Jackson, Tennessee.

The homes received an Award of Excellence for their collaborative brochure which provides information on each of the seven historic sites. The brochures are available at each of the seven sites and at the Knoxville Visitors Center. The Historic Homes were selected for this honor by a committee of museum professionals and TAM board members who evaluated nominees against museums of comparable budgets.

The Historic Homes of Knoxville is a successful partnership between seven historic homes that offer guided tours throughout the year.

The seven historic homes are Blount Mansion, Crescent Bend House & Gardens, Historic Ramsey House, James White’s Fort, Mabry-Hazen House, Marble Springs State Historic Site, and Historic Westwood.


Park Day at Mabry-Hazen

Knoxville – On Saturday, March 28, 2015, history buffs, community leaders and preservationists will team up with the Civil War Trust, History and Take Pride in America at more than 98 historic sites across the country to participate in the 18th annual Park Day.

Since its inception in 1996, Park Day has attracted volunteers of all ages and abilities bound by their dedication to serving their communities. In 2014, nearly 9,000 volunteers at 104 sites across the country donated more than 35,000 service hours. This year, organizers hope to build on these impressive figures.

Mabry-Hazen House will participate in Park Day on Saturday, March 28, 2015, from 9am to 2pm. Activities will include leaf and brush removal, mulching, and general spring-cleaning. Some tools will be provided, but volunteers are encouraged to bring rakes, pitchforks, tarps, and similar yard tools.

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Mabry-Hazen House, listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Photo courtesy Calvin Chappelle.

Additional information about the event can be obtained by calling 865-522-8661.

 


History Museum hosts film screening

(Knoxville, TN) The East Tennessee Historical Society will host two special events, March 25-26, 2015 to commemorate Medal of Honor Day and Knoxville’s hosting of the 2014 Medal of Honor.

Wednesday, March 25, Noon: Brown Bag Lecture: Medal of Honor Quilt Project with Kit Brown and Quilting Team. Join project coordinator Kit Brown and the team of quilters for a free Brown Bag lecture in which they will share their stories and memories from quiltings and the 2014 conference. This event is free and open to the public.

March 26, 7:00 p.m.: Documentary Film Premiere: Conspicuous Gallantry: The 2014 Medal of Honor Convention. East Tennessee Historical Society is pleased to host the debut showing of the film Conspicuous Gallantry: The 2014 Medal of Honor Convention, a 45-minute documentary chronicling the convention held in Knoxville, September 2014, and including interviews with ten Medal of Honor recipients and numerous others involved with or attending the convention. The film showing is free and open to the public.

The history center is located at 601 South Gay Street in Knoxville.


Knox Heritage hosts Spring tour

Knox Heritage is hosting a behind-the-scenes tours of some of the most interesting places in and around Knoxville on March 12, 2015 from 5:30pm to 7:30pm.

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The Knox Heritage event begins at Patrick Sullivan’s Saloon on North Central Street, in the Old City section of downtown Knoxville. A reception celebrating the property’s restoration will be held there beginning at 5:30pm before moving on to tour several renovation projects nearby undertaken by developers David Dewhirst and Mark Heinz. File photo of Old City by CelebrateKnoxville.com.

This is a great opportunity to see historic preservation in progress and connect with folks who are passionate about preserving, restoring and transforming the places that make Knoxville a great place to live and work.

Residents and interested supporters are invited to join the Knox Heritage community with a membership. Knox Heritage’s architectural salvage efforts have saved countless treasures from the landfill and provided materials for restoration projects across the region. The new office is located at 619 Broadway and offers an expanded inventory, plus will also host artisans and craftspeople for retail and gallery exhibits.

Editor’s Note: There will be a grand opening for the new Broadway space on April 3, 2015.

For more information, call 865-523-8008.


McClung Museum receives rare maps

KNOXVILLE—Almost 200 rare maps of Europe and other parts of the world created between the 1500s and 1800s now belong to the UT McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture.

Twenty of the maps are currently on display in the Burchfiel Geography Building. These, and the other maps housed in the museum’s collections, will be used for exhibition and teaching at the museum. They also will be used for undergraduate and graduate coursework on the history of maps and mapmaking from the sixteenth century onward and the importance of such maps to navigation, world politics, business and trade, agriculture, exploration, colonialism, and warfare.

“This collection of maps is a meaningful addition to our resources available for teaching, and several UT faculty have already taken advantage of the availability of the maps as a tool for inspiring meaningful discussions in their classrooms about cultural identity, political boundaries, and change, as well as socioeconomic conditions,” said Lindsey Waugh, the McClung Museum’s coordinator of academic programs.

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Students in Jovana Babovic’s Central European Cities class discuss political power, cultural perception, and urban development as they view seventeenth and eighteenth-century maps in the McClung Museum’s object study room. Photo submitted.

Most of the 191 maps are copperplate engravings with painstakingly applied hand color. They were created by mapmaking giants of the sixteenth to eighteenth centuries, including Gerard Mercator, the famous cartographer who was the first to plot the straight-line courses (Mercator projection) typical on today’s maps; Abraham Ortelius, the creator of the first modern atlas; Nicholas Visscher, whose family made some of the most famous maps during the golden age of Dutch mapmaking; and Guillaume DeLisle, popular for his maps of newly explored Africa and the Americas.

The gift came to the museum from Jeffery M. Leving, attorney and founder of Fathers’ Rights in Chicago. Two additional maps were gifted by Orrin Lippoff of Brooklyn, New York, and Robert J. Isakson of Mobile, Alabama. The museum worked closely with W. Graham Arader III, owner of Arader Galleries and a longtime UT donor, who facilitated these gifts.


Panel discussion at McClung Museum

KNOXVILLE—In honor of its new exhibit, the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture will host an artist panel discussion at 4 p.m. Monday, Feb. 2, 2015.

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Tanja Softic, a UT visiting artist and a professor of art at the University of Richmond, Virginia, as well as UT printmaking professors Beauvais Lyons, Althea Murphy-Price and Koichi Yamamoto will participate in the discussion. McClung Museum curator Catherine Shteynberg will be the moderator. Photo submitted.

Four of the 28 artists featured in the “Drawn from the McClung Museum” exhibit will be on hand for the panel discussion, which will highlight the artists’ choices and process, and the nature of the exhibition itself. “Drawn” pairs selected objects from the McClung’s collections with prints examining these objects in order to understand how art, science and culture are perceived and interpreted in museums.

The panel discussion, which will be in the museum’s temporary gallery, is free and open to the public.

The McClung Museum is at 1327 Circle Park Drive. Admission is free, and the museum’s hours are 9 a.m.- 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and 1-5 p.m. Sunday.

Free two-hour museum parking passes are available from the parking information building at the entrance to Circle Park Drive on weekdays. Free public transportation is available via the Knoxville Trolley Vol Line.


Scott Miller headlines Bijou event

Scott Miller and The Commonwealth will perform on the U.S. Cellular Stage at the Bijou Theatre for the 2015 Bijou Jubilee.

Presented by Pilot/Flying J and supported by Ole Smoky Moonshine, the annual fundraiser takes place Saturday, March 14, 2015, at 8:30 p.m. Tickets go on sale Friday, January 30 at 10 a.m. through Ticketmaster.

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The Bijou is hosting an exclusive VIP Pre-Show Party again this year. With the $100 VIP ticket, guests will enjoy an exclusive acoustic performance by Scott Miller and Mic Harrison plus food and drink from Holly’s Eventful Dining, Ole Smoky Moonshine, Ashe’s Wine & Spirits, and Bearden Beer Market.

An auction featuring artist-signed instruments and framed posters will also be held during the event.

Proceeds from the event will help preserve Knoxville’s historic Bijou Theatre, located at 803 South Gay Street in downtown Knoxville.


Knoxville train bell is returned

Knoxville’s Three Rivers Rambler held a special ceremony recently to celebrate the return of No. 154’s stolen bell.

No. 154 is an 1890 steam engine that ran freight operations in Knoxville in the early 1900s. The engine was stored in a Knoxville park for fifty years before being restored by the Three Rivers Rambler train ride. The coal-fired steam engine- believed to be one of the oldest operating steam engines in the United States- has been in service on the Three Rivers Rambler for about four years.

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Last summer 154’s bell was stolen from the engine. Two members of the Knoxville community- Bo Shafer, owner of a local insurance company, and Finbarr Saunders, a city councilman- each stepped forward to donate a replacement bell to the 3RR. Bo Shafer’s bell is now in operation on steam engine No. 203. Finbarr Saunder’s bell will be permanently displayed in the new 3RR depot.

Due to the efforts of the Knox County Sheriff’s department, 154’s bell was recently recovered and returned today to its proper place. A replica of 154 was given to Sheriff Jimmy “J.J.” Jones.


Blount Mansion sponsors History Suppers

The Blount Mansion Association is pleased to present the first annual History Suppers Events for 2015. These events will feature historians and authors speaking about topics related to Blount Mansion and Knoxville’s history. Supper is included at these events and a cash bar will be available. Costs: $65 per person per event.

February 3, 2015 – 6pm
Belle Boyd, Confederate Spy
Location: Boyd’s Jig and Reel
101 S Central St, Knoxville, TN 37902

Belle Boyd, a spy for the Confederacy, stayed in Knoxville at the Blount Mansion with her relatives during the Civil War. Learn more about the woman, her life and times, and Knoxville during the Civil War at Boyd’s Jig and Reel in the Old City.

RSVP By January 30, 2015 – spaces are limited.

March 23, 2015-6 p.m.
John Bell Hood and the Civil War in Tennessee
Location: The Grill at Highland’s Row
4705 Old Kingston Pike, Knoxville, TN 37919

History Press, Inc. reviews the content of Knight’s Hood’s Tennessee Campaign by saying of the battles: “The Tennessee Campaign of November and December 1864 was the Southern Confederacy’s last significant offensive operation of the Civil War. General John Bell Hood of the Confederate Army of Tennessee attempted to capture Nashville, the final realistic chance for a battlefield victory against the Northern juggernaut. Hood’s former West Point instructor, Major General George Henry Thomas, led the Union force, fighting those who doubted him in his own army as well as Hood’s Confederates. Through the bloody, horrific battles at Spring Hill, Franklin and Nashville and a freezing retreat to the Tennessee River, Hood ultimately failed. Civil War historian James R. Knight chronicles the Confederacy’s last real hope at victory and its bitter

Cost is $65 per person per event.

Please RSVP by calling Blount Mansion at (865) 525-2375.


TN Theatre celebrates milestone

In 2015, the Tennessee Theatre will celebrate a decade since it received new life through a $28 million restoration. The community is invited to a free grand reopening celebration Wednesday, Jan. 14, from 7-9 p.m., to mark the 10th anniversary milestone.

The anniversary celebration at the downtown Tennessee Theatre will include refreshments, a free performance on the Mighty Wurlitzer organ and backstage tours guided by theater historians.

Tours are limited to 75 people per tour and will be filled on a first-come, first-served basis, so arrive early to reserve a spot for 7:15, 7:45 or 8:15 p.m.

The Historic Tennessee Theatre Foundation also will unveil a 228-page coffee table book by Jack Neely entitled “The Tennessee Theatre: A Grand Entertainment Palace.”

Neely researched for the better part of a year to write the book and interviewed theater historians and living contributors to the restoration campaign. The book also contains more than 350 images spanning more than a century, including historic photographs, newspaper advertisements, architectural drawings, performers on stage at the Tennessee, movie and show posters, and more.

The Tennessee Theatre is the Official State Theatre of Tennessee and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

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Celebrate Christmas in the City

It’s Christmas in the City; there’s so much to see and enjoy in downtown Knoxville this holiday season, from making a holiday wreath at Ramsey House or visiting the Holidays on Ice skating rink in Market Square.

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The Holidays on Ice skating rink is open daily through January 4, 2015 in downtown Knoxville’s Market Square. Admission is $10 for adults and $7 for children (season passes are also available). Admission includes skate rental and unlimited time on the ice. Photo by CelebrateKnoxville.com.

On December 13 and 20, the Market Square Farmers Market hosts the Holiday Market throughout Market Square and Market Street. Vendors will have booths set up with handmade gifts, holiday decor, food and more. This is a great place to find unique gifts for everyone on your shopping list.

Parking is free in Knoxville’s Market Square (406 Walnut Street) State Street and Locust Street garages all day on weekends.

Dec. 13
Wreath Making Workshop at the Historic Ramsey House, 2614 Thorngrove Pike.
Join your friends for this great tradition of fun and creativity and go home with a beautiful natural green wreath. We supply the Holiday treats, materials and the expert instruction of Julia Shiflett and her Christmas helpers. Make your reservation in advance and bring handheld garden pruners and gloves. The social is 12:30 p.m. with the class starting promptly at 1 p.m. Sign up with a buddy or start a family tradition. Reserve your spot by calling 865-546-0745.

Dec. 14
“It’s a Wonderful Life”
Celebrate the Christmas season in the grandeur of the Tennessee Theatre, Gay Street, as Home Federal Bank presents classic film, “It’s a Wonderful Life.” Admission is free; no ticket is required. Seating is limited to the theater’s capacity. Doors open one hour prior to each screening.

Dec. 13 – 15
The Nativity Pageant of Knoxville
The pageant combines a cast of 90 members, live animals, realistic sets and authentic costumes to create a powerful presentation of the miraculous birth of Jesus Christ and the meaning of Christmas. The story is told in beautiful music and narration. The pageant is free and is interpreted for the deaf and hearing-impaired. Saturday, December 13 at 3 pm, Sunday, December 14 at 3 pm, Monday, December 15 at 7 pm, at the Knoxville Civic Coliseum. Free Admission.


Candlelight tours at Ramsey House

Knoxville’s historic Ramsey House will be offering Candlelight Tours on Sunday, December 14, 2014. This event will provide a rare opportunity to tour the 1797 historic home by candlelight while it is adorned in natural holiday decor.

Candlelight tours are between 6:00 – 8:00 p.m. Admission is free, however donations are accepted. Seasonal music, hot cider, and Christmas treats will be served.

RamseyHouse

Ramsey House Plantation, located off Gov. John Sevier Highway at 2614 Thorn Grove Pike, is the 1797 home of Col. Frances Alexander Ramsey, an important figure in the early settlement of Tennessee who, along with family members, was instrumental in the development of Knoxville from a small frontier village to a bustling city.

For additional information, contact Ramsey House at 865-546-0745.


Knoxville calendars now on sale

While making your New Year’s plans, make sure you plan to pick up a 2015 Knoxville Remembered calendar to keep you on track for all your appointments. This year’s photos include views of Chilhowee Park, the construction of the Kress Building, the Airplane Filling Station and many faces of Knoxville past. All photos used are from the Calvin McClung Historical Collection’s Digital Collection.

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The production and distribution of Knoxville Remembered calendars is made possible through partnerships with the East Tennessee Historical Society and the Friends of the Knox County Public Library.

Calendars are $15 and are available at select locations. Proceeds benefit the Knox County Public Library Staff Association. For large orders or to order by phone, call Casey Fox at 215-8713.

Calendar sale locations:
East Tennessee History Center Gift Shop
The Disc Exchange
Friends of the Library Branch Sales
Mast General Store
Pratt’s Country Market
Rala
Raven Records & Rarities
Rothrock Used Book Store (in Lawson McGhee Library)
Union Avenue Books

For large orders or to order by phone, call Casey Fox at 865-215-8713.


Mabry Hazen hosts holiday tours

Knoxville’s Mabry-Hazen House invites the public to enjoy history and the holidays with a tour through the historic site. Rooms and other areas will be decorated by well known Knoxville decorators as well as volunteers and museum staff.

Christmas

The event is free of charge and light refreshments will be served. Christmas Tours are scheduled for Saturday, December 13, 2014 from 5-8pm and Sunday, December 14, from 2-5pm.

Built in 1858, The Mabry-Hazen House is strategically located on the highest hill east of downtown Knoxville with spacious views in all directions. The home was occupied and defended by both armies during the Civil War. It housed three generations of the same family for 130 years; the museum showcases one of the largest original family collections in America.

Attendance and donations will help support the museum’s mission to preserve and educate the public about an important part of East Tennessee history.

For more information, call 865-522-8661.


Knoxville gets new Civil War marker

Knoxville is getting a new Tennessee Civil War Trails Marker on December 5, 2014. Located at the Knox County Courthouse, the new marker tells the story of Union and Confederate rallies taking place in April 1861 only blocks apart on Gay Street.

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The Knox County Courthouse features several historical markers include a Veterans Memorial (pictured) for Knoxville’s soldiers who served in the Spanish American War (1898-1902), another honoring John ‘Nolichucky Jack’ Sevier, for whom nearby Sevier County is named, a and a WWII Memorial placed by the Simon Harris Chapter of the D.A.R. The new marker highlights the story of Union and Confederate rallies taking place in April 1861 only blocks apart on Gay Street.  Photo by CelebrateKnoxville.com.
The ceremony for dedication will take place from noon to 1:30 p.m., December 5, 2014 at the Knox County Courthouse, Main Street. Participating in the dedication will be Knox County Mayor Tim Burchett and Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero. Representing the state is Tennessee State Historian Dr. Carroll Van West, who, along with Tennessee Tourism Commissioner Susan Whitaker, co-chairs the Tennessee Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission.

Others participating in the program are East Tennessee Historical Society Director Cherel Henderson, and Calvin Chappelle, chair of the Knox County Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission.

The Tennessee Civil War Trails Program is part of a five-state trails system that encourages visitors to explore both well-known and familiar sites associated with events of the Civil War. Tennessee has 310 markers, and its trails guide is the most requested of the five states, which also include Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, and North Carolina.


Candle making workshop at Marble Springs

Marble Springs State Historic Site will host two Candle Making Workshops on Saturday, December 6, 2014 starting at 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. This hands-on workshop will teach visitors about lighting sources of the 18th-19th centuries. Visitors will learn how to make beeswax candles by the open hearth. Reservations are required and space is limited to twenty participants for each workshop. Details are subject to change.

Fee: $10 for cost of materials.

Programming assistance for this event is provided by the Arts & Heritage Fund and Knox County. Marble Springs is funded under an agreement with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Tennessee Historical Commission, and supplemented by additional funds raised by the Governor John Sevier Memorial Association.

All activities take place at the Marble Springs State Historic Site: 1220 West Governor John Sevier Highway, Knoxville, TN 37920.

For more information, call 865-573-5508.


Knox Heritage holds preservation awards

KNOXVILLE, TENN. – Knox Heritage holds its 2014 Preservation Awards ceremony and Annual Meeting on Thursday, November 20, 2014 at the Bijou Theatre in downtown Knoxville. The special guest of the evening is Knoxville’s Mayor, Madeline Rogero. Admission is free, and everyone is welcome to attend.

The event begins at 5:00 p.m. with a reception, followed by the Annual Meeting and Preservation Awards at 6:00 p.m. A report of the organization’s work from the previous year will be delivered by Knox Heritage board president Annette Brun. Mayor Rogero will deliver remarks before the Preservation Awards are presented.

Awards for the best in preservation during 2014 will be presented in the following categories: the City of Knoxville Mayor’s Award and the Knox County Mayor’s Award; the Greystone Award; the “Fantastic Fifteen” for preservation rehabilitation, restoration, compatible infill and preservation stewardship; the Volunteer of the Year; and the Media Award.


Jazz lunch features Wynton Marsalis works

Wynton Marsalis’ 1985 release, Black Codes from the Underground is the featured work for the next Jazz Lunch on December 3, 2014, at noon at the Square Room in Market Square, downtown Knoxville.

The album featured Marsalis’ then working band: saxophonist Branford Marsalis, pianist Kenny Kirkland, bassist Charnett Moffett and drummer Jeff ‘Tain’ Watts. Marsalis’ original compositions for this date have proven to be some of his most influential works. Pianist Andrew LaPrise has assembled a cast of excellent young musicians to recreate this entire album, beginning to end.

Admission to the concert is $15 and includes a lunch buffet served up by Café 4. Tickets are available online at http://www.knoxjazz.org or by visiting Café 4 in
person prior to the show.


Blount Mansion hosts holiday tours

Blount Mansion will host a colonial Christmas celebration and Open House on Friday, December 5, 2014, with candlelight tours of the mansion at 6 p.m. and 7 p.m.

Enjoy Christmas traditions from the colonial period while enjoying demonstrations of what Christmas was like on the Tennessee frontier. Guests artists and crafts people will particularly enjoy a demonstration of colonial yarn spinning techniques while enjoying some snacks and warm drinks.

BlountMansionKnoxvilleTN

The Blount Mansion, also known as William Blount Mansion, is located at 200 West Hill Avenue in downtown Knoxville, Tennessee, and was the home of the only territorial governor of the Southwest Territory, William Blount (1749–1800). Blount, also a signer of the United States Constitution and a U.S. Senator from Tennessee, lived on the property with his family and the mansion served as the headquarters of the Southwest Territory. In 1796, much of the Tennessee Constitution was drafted at the mansion.

Tennessee state historian John Trotwood Moore once called Blount Mansion “the most important historical spot in Tennessee.”

Suggested donation for the Open House, which will be used to help preserve the mansion, is $5.

For more information call (865) 525-2375.


Knoxville Blue Slip Winery relocates

Knoxville City and Knox County officials and dignitaries were in attendance at yesterday’s grand opening of the Blue Slip Winery at the historic Southern Railway Station (built in 1903) in downtown Knoxville.

Blue Slip Winery owners Linn Slocum, Jeff Galyon, and Marvin House called the new location for the business “a treasure” and thanked family, friends, business leaders, and a host of others (including local grape growers!) for helping to make their dream a reality. Beginning in 2009, the business was formerly located on Jackson Avenue in the Old City and is Knoxville’s first urban winery.

The new location in the Southern Railway Station provides not only more space for the on-site production of handcrafted wines made from local grapes, it also provides a place where customers can rent space for special events including wedding receptions.

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Celebrating the grand opening of the Blue Slip Winery in the Southern Railway Station are from left: Blue Slip Winery owners Jeff Galyon and Linn Slocum, Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero, and Blue Slip Winery partner Marvin House, CEO of Knoxville-based Merit Construction. Photo by Laura Long Martin, CelebrateKnoxville.com.

Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero praised the location for the new business, saying that the area was “walkable and bikeable,” and featured not only ample parking but also a bus stop right out front.

“This is about being downtown in the heart of the city,” Mayor Rogero told the crowd at the event’s official ribbon cutting. “This is about shopping local.”

Knox County Mayor Tim Burchett also expressed the county’s approval of the site, calling it “Napa Valley Tennessee,” and joked that although he did not drink alcohol, he was a certainly a big fan of economic development.

Jim and Betty Tolliver, owners of the Old Smokey Railway Museum, attended the event and said they were “thrilled with how the building has been restored.”

Jim Tolliver pointed out historic items in the building’s showcase shelves and noted that the Southern Railway Station’s former ticket window was still a great feature, along with restored benches and ornamental fireplaces.

–Laura Long Martin, CelebrateKnoxville.com, November 4, 2014.

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Jim and Betty Tolliver, owners of the Old Smokey Railway Museum, stand next to former ticket window in the restored Southern Railway Station in downtown Knoxville. The building is now the new location for Knoxville’s first urban winery, Blue Slip Winery. Below, the view of the Southern Railway Station from the Gay Street Bridge. The Blue Slip Winery building is on the right. Photo by Laura Long Martin, CelebrateKnoxville.com.

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Historic TN Theatre offers tours

The Tennessee Theatre invites guests to a Fall Festival Open House during First Friday from 6-8 p.m. on Nov. 7, 2014 with fall-themed activities, snacks and free history tours of the iconic venue.

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Located in the heart of downtown Knoxville, the Tennessee Theatre opened in 1928 as a movie palace. The Tennessee Theatre is the Official State Theatre of Tennessee and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Photo by CelebrateKnoxville.com.

The fall festival will include a caricature artist who will draw free portraits of attendees and the iconic theater marquee; apple cider and fall treats; music on the Mighty Wurlitzer organ; and free backstage tours led by theater historians.

The tours will leave the lobby at 6:30, 7 and 7:30 p.m., with groups limited to 50 people per tour, so guests are encouraged to arrive early.

 


Day of the Dead at Emporium

The Arts & Culture Alliance is pleased to present a new exhibition hosted by HoLa Hora Latina in commemoration of Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead), featuring a collection of traditional and modern ofrendas (memorial displays), paintings, masks, sculptures, and paper mache catrinas by artists Angel Luna, Hector Saldivar, Margarita Garza, and others.

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A whimsical paper mache’ skeleton adorns a display for celebrating the Day of the Dead, a popular Hispanic tradition, similar to All Saints Day, to honor deceased relatives and friends. This year’s exhibition will include selections from “Frutos Latinos,” an exhibition displayed at the Emporium Center in downtown Knoxville beginning November 7, 2014 with special activities throughout the evening. File photo by CelebrateKnoxville.com.

Casa HoLa (the office/gallery space of HoLa Hora Latina, Suite 109 in the Emporium) will offer coloring, face painting, and sugar skull decorating.

The First Friday reception features music and dance performances by Pasión Flamenca from 6:00-6:30 PM and a Jazz Jam Session hosted by Vance Thompson and Friends from 7:00-9:00 PM in the Black Box Theatre.

For more information, contact the Arts & Culture Alliance at (865) 523-7543.


Scott Miller at The Laurel Theatre

Naturalized Knoxvillian Scott Miller returns to the Laurel Theater on Friday, October 3, at 8 p.m., as part of a powerful acoustic trio featuring Rayna Gellert and Bryn Davies, following the release of his latest album, Big, Big World.

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Scott Miller

Raised in Virginia’ Shanendoah Valley, where he currently resides, Scott’s genuine interest and identity with the lore of the South and the Civil War, along with his intelligent and take-no-prisoners lyrics, set him apart from other roots rock artists and have propelled him to national and international prominence.

Tickets are $16 to $18. Call 865-523-7521.

Jubilee Community Arts is a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation. The Laurel Theater is located at 16th Street and Laurel Avenue in the historic Fort Sanders neighborhood of downtown Knoxville, Tennessee.


Old Gray lantern tour celebrates history

Part history, part theater, and all fundraiser, the annual Lantern and Carriage Tour at Old Gray Cemetery takes place on Sunday, September 28, 2014, from 4 – 7PM (rain or shine).

This event is an afternoon of food, fun, carriage rides, and some amazing stories of adversity and accomplishment told by historical reenactors throughout the cemetery during the tour.

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This year’s Old Gray Cemetery Lantern Tour takes place from 4-7 p.m., September 28, 2014, rain or shine. Photo by CelebrateKnoxville.com.

In addition, the site is now a Tennessee Urban Forestry Council arboretum. Marble stones, made possible by The Akima Club and Knoxville Garden Club, identify botanical and common names of over forty trees.

As you tour the facility and grounds, you’ll be met by historical characters (actresses, novelists, businessmen, soldiers, politicians, more) that would love to share their story with you.

Parking for this event will be across the street at St. John’s Lutheran Church, Emory Park Place and neighbor parking lots.

Entrance ticket: $ 10.00 for adults and $ 5.00 for students. Carriage ride additional fee $5.00. No Reservations Required.

The cemetery is located at 543 North Broadway, Knoxville, Tennessee.


Scruffy City Soiree 2014 is Sept 27

In support of Knox Heritage and its mission to preserve Knoxville’s historic treasures, The Scruffy City Soirée 2014, will be held September 27, at 6:30 p.m., at The Standard, 416 West Jackson Avenue in Knoxville.

The Scruffy City Soirée is an annual fall fundraiser, which provides support for many important Knox Heritage programs and services. This year’s event chairs are Melissa Charles and Katie Bahr.

Knox Heritage staff works to identify and preserve historic places in Knoxville and throughout the 16-county region.

Included in the ticket price is a delicious buffet dinner, wine & beer, and live entertainment, and auction that offers unique local art, crafts, excursions and tours. Tickets are $100 per person.

For more information, call 865-523-8008.


Historic Homes of Knoxville host luncheon

The Historic Homes of Knoxville is hosting a noon luncheon on Friday, October 3, 2014, at The Foundry to celebrate the founding of the City of Knoxville 223 years ago.

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Blount Mansion, Knoxville.

The Historic Homes of Knoxville are uniformly significant in Tennessee’s accession as the 16th state in 1796. Apart from the paramount importance of their preservation, each house museum offers events and educational opportunities that benefit the community at large. Properties include Blount Mansion, Crescent Bend House & Gardens, Historic Ramsey House, James White’s Fort, Mabry-Hazen House, Marble Springs State Historic Site, and Historic Westwood.

Congressman John J. Duncan, Jr. of Tennessee’s 2nd congressional district will be the featured speaker.

Tickets are $50 and proceeds from the luncheon will benefit the Historic Homes. Purchase tickets by calling 865-523-7543.


Community Screenings begin at film fest

East Tennessee PBS Community Cinema Screenings begin Saturday, September 13, 2014 at the Knoxville Film Festival at Regal Downtown West Cinema 8.

MAKERS: Women in Hollywood
Saturday, September 13, 4 p.m. at Regal Downtown West Cinema 8

MAKERS: Women in Hollywood, is an hour-long documentary showcasing the women of showbiz, from the earliest pioneers to present-day power players, as they influence the creation of one of the country’s biggest commodities: entertainment. Women in Hollywood, the first of six MAKERS documentaries that will air on PBS stations this fall, airs on East Tennessee PBS on Tuesday, October 7, at 9 p.m.

After the screening, East Tennessee PBS Communications Coordinator Paige Travis will facilitate a panel discussion with: stage and screen actor Dale Dickey; director of the forthcoming Nest Features film Up the River Amy Hubbard; director of The Happiest Person in America, Sara Israel; producer of Something, Anything, Ashley Maynor; and writer and producer of Candee Noir, Kelly Shipe.

Admission to the MAKERS screening is free.


Blount Mansion hosts art display

The public is invited to the First Friday Art Opening at the Blount Mansion Visitors Center, 5-7 p.m. on Friday September, 5, 2014, 200 West Hill Avenue in Knoxville.

“We are privileged to have acquired many wonderful pieces over the years, and now we are going to display them for our visitors,” says David Hearnes, Assistant to the Director at Blount Mansion. “This exhibit will showcase some of the best art that the Blount Mansion Association has collected since 1926. These prints and portraits help to make the house truly an amazing experience and help to tell the story of Knoxville, Tennessee, and the United States.”

The show will include portraits of famous Tennesseans, such as Territorial Governor William Blount and his half-brother, Tennessee Governor Willie Blount, as well as Charles McClung, John Sevier, and Mary Boyce Temple.

This is a free event.

Blount Mansion is Knoxville’s only National Historic Landmark given by the National Park Service and is the oldest house museum in Knox County. It is owned and operated by the Blount Mansion Association, Inc., a nonprofit, educational organization.


Knoxville celebrates history fair

The 2014 East Tennessee History Fair will celebrate the region’s history with reenactments, activities, and tours, from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., Saturday, August 16, 2014, in downtown Knoxville – Market Square & Krutch Park, Clinch & Gay Streets.

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Presented by the East Tennessee Historical Society, along with dozens of businesses, historical organizations, museums, musicians, and individuals from across the region, the East Tennessee History Fair features fun and educational activities highlighting the people, places, stories, and events that comprise the shared history of our 35-county region. File photo by CelebrateKnoxville.com.

Special highlights include: Free admission to the Museum of East Tennessee History, WDVX and Clayton Country Music Stage, living History Timeline—Cherokee to Vietnam War, and dozens of historical and genealogical societies representing county, regional, and state organizations. The event is free and open to the public.

For more information, call 865-215-8824.