KCDC improves housing properties

KNOXVILLE, TN – Knoxville’s Community Development Corporation (KCDC) recently approved a $33.1 million rehabilitation initiative at three affordable housing properties. In total, 705 units at Lonsdale Homes, North Ridge Crossing and The Vista at Summit Hill will undergo significant improvements with an emphasis on energy efficiency and quality of life for residents. The plans include better insulation, LED lighting, energy-efficient appliances, plumbing repairs, roof replacement and new windows, flooring, cabinets and countertops.

“This initiative will yield significant benefits for the three properties and the residents we serve,” KCDC Executive Director and CEO Ben Bentley said. “The physical condition of these properties will be greatly enhanced and that, in turn, leads to lower operational and maintenance costs.”

The improvements, which are scheduled to be completed in 21 months, will be funded with a combination of low-income housing tax credits and multifamily housing bonds.

Sean Gilbert, KCDC’s senior vice president of housing, said the breakdown includes 260 units at Lonsdale Homes ($11.9 million); 270 units at North Ridge Crossing ($13 million); and 175 units at The Vista at Summit Hill ($8.2 million).

The plans are part of KCDC’s transition of its public housing stock to the rental assistance demonstration (RAD) program, which was created by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) in 2012 to help agencies continue their housing mission without dependence on federal funds. The program allows housing agencies to leverage public and private debt and equity to reinvest in their properties.

About Knoxville’s Community Development Corporation

Since 1936, KCDC has been dedicated to enhancing the quality of life for the citizens of Knoxville and Knox County. KCDC’s mission is to improve and transform neighborhoods and communities by providing quality affordable housing, advancing development initiatives and fostering self-sufficiency. For more information, call 865-403- 1100 or visit https://www.kcdc.org/.


Knoxville’s Community Development Corporation (KCDC) recently announced a $33.1 rehabilitation initiative at three affordable housing properties: Lonsdale Homes, North Ridge Crossing (pictured) and The Vista at Summit Hill. The improvements will improve energy efficiency and quality of life for residents. Photo submitted.


Dinner honors Vietnam veterans

Knoxville, TN – This October, East Tennessee PBS will host a Veteran Honor Dinner to celebrate the area men and women who have served our country. The dinner will be held at The Foundry in World’s Fair Park on October 5, 2017 from 5:30 p.m. until 9 p.m. Proceeds will go towards the production of veterans programs on East Tennessee PBS as well as supporting the needs of volunteers and visitors at a half-scale mobile replica of the Vietnam War Memorial that will be in Knoxville October 4 through October 8. Every ticket purchased sponsors a veteran to attend the dinner.

This dinner coincides with the opening ceremony of the memorial will bring together area veterans with our community for a fun night to celebrate the service and sacrifice of the brave men and women in East Tennessee.

Guests include Captain Bill Robinson, the longest-held American Enlisted POW, Mayor Tim Burchett and Mayor Madeline Rogero. Fanatic Brewery is providing a veteran’s brew, created especially for this event. The event is being sponsored by Pilot/Flying J, Food City, The City of Knoxville, Covenant Health, Visit Knoxville, Metropolitan Knoxville Airport Authority, and the Clayton Foundation.

For tickets, table sponsorship or additional information, please contact Barbara Shipley at 865-595-0244 or bshipley@EastTennesseePBS.org or Kate Spears at 931-261-4965, kspears@EastTennesseePBS.org or go to www.EastTennesseePBS.org/dinner.

 


Shakespeare shows begin July 13

The Tennessee Stage Company presents its 27th summer Shakespeare Festival, featuring the comedies Two Gentlemen of Verona and The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged). The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged) opens the festival on Thursday, July 13, 2017 at Market Square. It continues through Aug. 12, alternating performances with Two Gentlemen of Verona which runs July 14 – Aug. 13.

Admission is free to the Market Square and Blount County Public Library performances.

The indoor matinees at the Scruffy City Hall are $15. A donation basket is passed at Market Square with a $ 10.00 suggested donation. Special VIP seating is available on the Square for $ 15.00.

THE TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA

July 13, 15, 21, 23, 27, 29, Aug. 4, 6, 10, 126

7:00 pm nightly outdoors on Market Square

What happens when a young man suddenly finds his best friend’s girlfriend more desirable than his own? Shakespeare’s refreshing comedy of first love is complete with wily servants, disguised lovers and Crab – the most lovable, ill mannered canine ever to grace the stage. Valentine and Proteus, the two gents in question, prove that Romeo was not the only young lad in Verona to fall in love! “What light is light, if Silvia be not seen/What joy is joy if Silvia be not by.”

THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (Abridged)

July 14, 16, 20, 22, 28, 30, Aug. 3, 5, 11, 13

7:00 pm nightly outdoors on Market Square

This is 37 Plays. Three Actors. 90 Minutes. The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged) is directed by H. Caitlin Corbitt and Two Gentlemen of Verona is directed by Amy Hubbard, founding Artistic Director of The Actor’s Co-Op.

For more information, call 865-546-4280 or e-mail tennesseestage@comcast.net

Shakespeare On The Square would not be possible without the support of the Tennessee Arts Commission, The Clayton Foundation, the CBID, the City of Knoxville and Knox County.


Knoxville hosts alt fuel rally

KNOXVILLE – Knoxville Utilities Board (KUB) hosted a stop on the second annual ‘From Sea-to- Shining-Sea’ Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) Road Rally Across America, a nationwide initiative highlighting the many benefits of using natural gas in transportation and the wide variety of vehicles currently operating on natural gas.

The spectrum of rally vehicles – ranging from a sedan to Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL) 3D-printed utility vehicle – illustrated the diverse private and commercial uses of clean-burning CNG.

Presented by NGVAmerica, American Public Gas Association (APGA) and American Gas Association (AGA), the rally launched outside of Long Beach, California, on June 5, and will conclude in Washington, D.C., on June 16. The journey includes 18 stops and covers 4,825 miles, demonstrating the growing availability of natural gas fueling stations across the country.

The event took place at KUB’s recently opened, publicly accessible compressed natural gas (CNG) fueling station at 1820 Third Creek Road in Knoxville. The station began fueling KUB’s CNG fleet in November 2016 and celebrated its grand opening for public use in April.

“We are honored to host this rally to encourage and celebrate the use of clean burning natural gas in vehicles throughout our nation,” KUB President and CEO Mintha Roach said. “It is exciting to see the variety of vehicles today from organizations that share KUB’s commitment to environmental stewardship and sustainability.”

Roach announced during the program that KUB’s fleet this year earned Tennessee Green Fleet certification from the Tennessee Clean Fuels Coalition. The program certifies fleets based on actual impacts and other actions taken to improve fleet sustainability and efficiency. KUB’s fleet began using CNG in the 1970s and now also includes vehicles powered by electric hybrid technology, E85 flex fuel and biodiesel.

A variety of alternative fuel vehicles from KUB, Sevier County Utility District, Gibson County Utility District, Middle Tennessee Natural Gas and Johnston North America fleets were on display at the rally, illustrating that any fleet can reap the cost and environmental benefits of CNG.

At the event, KUB presented the City of Knoxville with the First Fleet Award to recognize the city’s status as the CNG fueling station’s first fleet customer and for its leadership in alternative fuel use.

“As a local government, we seek to lead by example and show how practical, cost-saving investments can benefit our environment and the sustainability of our community,” Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero said. “We thank KUB for setting an example for our community through a longtime commitment to sustainable practices.”

ORNL presented a look at the future with its 3D-printed utility vehicle, a natural-gas- powered hybrid electric vehicle using bi-directional wireless charging for a new approach to energy use and storage. Researchers at the lab’s National Transportation Research Center are examining new and innovative ways to maximize energy efficiency through transformative science and integrated technology solutions.

The Tennessee Call 811 hot air balloon also was on hand to support the event. The balloon travels the country as a reminder of the importance of calling 811 before digging to avoid accidental damage to underground utility lines, including natural gas lines.

CNG is an environmentally friendly gasoline and diesel alternative made by compressing natural gas to less than 1 percent of its volume at standard atmospheric pressure. Costing about half as much as gasoline or diesel fuel and releasing about 90 percent fewer emissions, CNG protects the environment and makes driving more affordable.

Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero accepts from KUB President and CEO Mintha Roach the First Fleet Award at KUB’s publicly accessible compressed natural gas (CNG) fueling station on June 13, 2017. The presentation acknowledges the city’s leadership in alternative fuel use and was part of the “From-Sea- to-Shining- Sea” Natural Gas Vehicle Road Rally Across America. Photo submitted.


Summit offers 3D mammography

Summit Medical Group will offer three-dimensional (3D) mammography at its Deane Hill Diagnostic Imaging Center starting in June 2017 with availability at the other Knoxville-area Summit Diagnostic Centers to follow soon thereafter. Aimed at enhancing patient care, 3D mammography provides a higher rate of detection for breast cancer than two-dimensional screenings.

3D mammography takes multiple images of breast tissue to create a multi-layered, three-dimensional image, compared to a single image created by traditional mammography. This 3D image provides a clearer picture, allowing doctors to examine breast tissue one layer at a time to help make a more accurate diagnosis. Thus, 3D mammograms help reduce false positives and the need for further testing, particularly for women with dense breast tissue.

“We strive to provide the latest technology and equipment to ensure our patients receive the highest level of care when they visit us for a screening or imaging procedure, and that now includes 3D mammography,” said Debbie Everts, mammography supervisor at Summit Diagnostic Centers. “The goal, as always, is early and accurate detection – and your peace of mind. If you’re due for a yearly mammogram, please consider 3D technology for your next screening.”

A 3D mammogram emits the same amount of radiation as a traditional mammogram, takes only a few seconds more to perform and causes no additional discomfort. The difference is the benefit of enhanced images for a physician to review.

Any individual can receive a 3D mammogram. Women age 40 and older should receive a yearly mammogram, as well as those with risk factors and family history as recommended by a primary care physician.

Summit operates three diagnostic centers in Knoxville, including locations at Deane Hill, Cedar Bluff and Fountain City.

Call 865-588-8005 for scheduling.


Knox wins 3 environmental awards

Keep Knoxville Beautiful, Knoxville Regional Transportation Planning Organization, and Suttree Landing Park in Knox County are all among the 2017 Governor’s Environmental Stewardship Awards this year. Winners will be recognized for their achievements and positive impact on the state’s natural resources in an awards ceremony to be held in Nashville on June 16.

“These organizations represent the spirit and drive that make the Volunteer State great,” Governor Haslam said. “I thank all of the winners for their individual contributions to the environment and for keeping Tennessee a beautiful state in which to live and work and to visit.”

The Governor’s Environmental Stewardship Awards program recognizes exceptional voluntary actions that improve or protect environment and natural resources with projects or initiatives not required by law or regulation.

The 2017 Governor’s Environmental Stewardship Award recipients are:

Belmont University – Davidson County
Chattanooga Area Regional Transportation Authority – Hamilton County
City of Lebanon – Wilson County
Keep Knoxville Beautiful – Knox County
Knoxville Regional Transportation Planning Organization – Knox County
Metropolitan Nashville Airport Authority – Davidson County
Nashville Fire Department Station 19 – Davidson County
New Hope Christian Academy – Shelby County
Sherwood Forest Project – Davidson County
Suttree Landing Park – Knox County
The Nashville Food Project – Davidson County

The 2017 awards roster includes two Pursuit of Excellence Awards, which recognize past award winners who continue to demonstrate a high regard for environmental stewardship practices. The winner of one additional honor, the Robert Sparks Walker Lifetime Achievement Award, will be announced at the awards ceremony.

A panel of 22 professionals representing agricultural, conservation, forestry, environmental and academic professionals judged more than 89 nominations and selected this year’s award recipients based on criteria including on-the-ground achievement, innovation and public education.


Orchid Awards presented March 7

Keep Knoxville Beautiful will host the annual Orchids Beautification Awards at the Standard at 416 West Jackson Avenue on March 7, 2017 from 6:00 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. The deadline for purchasing tickets is this Friday, March 3.

From 6:00 until 7:00, there will be a complimentary beer and wine reception with a floral beer specially brewed and donated to the event by Balter Beerworks. During the reception, guests may bid on silent auction items donated by local companies such as Bliss, Smoky Mountain Vintage Lumber, TVB, Knox Whiskey Works, Ijams Nature Center, Meadowsweet Massage and Wellness, Knoxville Symphony Orchestra, and many more.

Keep Knoxville Beautiful’s three goals to promote a “cleaner, greener, more beautiful Knoxville” will be highlighted by a photo-booth, a beer garden, and with a live painting by muralist Perry Hodson. Guests will enjoy live music by the Old City Buskers.

The ceremony and dinner will begin at 7:00 and will be emceed by Dino Cartwright of WVLT. Keep Knoxville Beautiful will announce its next Community of the Year, the area of Knox County where it will focus the majority of its efforts during the 2017-18 year.

Gale Fulton, Director of the School of Landscape Architecture at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville will be the night’s guest speaker. Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero will also be in attendance, and will present the first Felicia Harris Hoehne Award. Dino will present the Orchids Awards to a winner from each of the following six categories: Outdoor Space, Public Art, Restaurant/Café/Bar/Brewery, New Architecture, Environmental Stewardship, and Redesign/Reuse. Finally, Tom Salter, Solid Waste Director at Knox County, will close the night by presenting the Mary Lou Horner Award to a previous Orchid winner that has been improved or remains “orchid-worthy.”

A list of all nominees can be found at http://www.keepknoxvillebeautiful.org/orchid-awards.

The deadline for purchasing tickets is this Friday, March 3. Individual tickets are $85 each and tables for 10 are $750. Tickets can be purchased at www.keepknoxvillebeautiful.org/orchid-awards/. All proceeds benefit Keep Knoxville Beautiful’s programs.

Keep Knoxville Beautiful is a local non-profit with a mission to promote a cleaner, greener, and more beautiful community.


Ancient Egyptian cats at McClung

KNOXVILLE—The McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, opens the new exhibition “Divine Felines: Cats of Ancient Egypt” on Saturday, Feb. 4, 2017.

From domesticated cats to mythic symbols of divinities, felines played an important role in ancient Egyptian imagery for thousands of years. Now, 80 items from the Egyptian holdings of the Brooklyn Museum will be on view in “Divine Felines” at the museum through May 7, 2017. Stela with the Gods Bes and Tutu, 332-30 B.C.E.. Limestone, Brooklyn Museum. Charles Edwin Wilbour Fund. Image courtesy McClung Museum.

Likely first domesticated in ancient Egypt, cats were revered for their fertility and valued for their ability to protect homes and granaries from vermin. But felines were also associated with royalty and deities. Combining a lion’s body and a king’s head, sphinxes guarded temple entrances and provided protection as temple objects. The ferocious goddess Sakhmet, depicted as a lioness or lion-headed woman, and the goddess Bastet, represented as a cat or a cat-headed woman, together symbolized the duality of feline nature — caring yet dangerous. The male leonine gods Bes and Tutu were popularly worshiped as protectors of fertility, health and fortune.

Exhibition programming, all free and open to the public, also will include:

A lecture on mummification in ancient Egypt by scholar Bob Brier, co-sponsored by the East Tennessee Society of the Archaeological Institute of America, at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 21.

Two free family fun days—”Purrs from the Past,” 1–4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 25, and “To Kitties’ Health,” 1­–4 p.m. Saturday, March 25.

A stroller tour for caregivers and infants through four-year-olds, “Kitties and Toddlers,” at 10 a.m. Monday, Feb. 27.

A lecture on cat behavior by Julie Albright from UT’s School of Veterinary Medicine at 2 p.m. Sunday, March 19.
“Divine Felines” is organized by the Brooklyn Museum and Yekaterina Barbash, associate curator of Egyptian Art at the Brooklyn Museum.

The exhibition is presented by the Elaine A. Evans Museum Fund, Aletha and Clayton Brodine Museum Fund, the First Tennessee Foundation, UT Ready for the World, Audrey Duncan, Wahid and Samia Hanna, the Archaeological Institute of America, the UT College of Veterinary Medicine and the Arab American Club of Knoxville. Additional support is provided by Knox County, the City of Knoxville, and the Arts and Heritage Fund.

The McClung Museum is at 1327 Circle Park Drive. Museum admission is free, and the museum’s hours are 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Monday to Saturday and 1–5 p.m. Sundays. Groups may schedule tours by calling 865-974-2144 or emailing museum@utk.edu. Free two-hour museum parking passes are available from the parking information building at the entrance to Circle Park Drive on weekdays by request. Free parking is available on Circle Park Drive on a first-come, first-served basis on weekends. Free public transportation to the museum is also available via the Knoxville Trolley Vol Line.


Knox Library celebrates O’Connor

In January 2017, Knox County Public Library System is exploring the life and work of Flannery O’Connor, the woman who arguably created “Southern Gothic” literature with her haunting stories and eccentric characters. Join us for a six-part series led by Ed Francisco, Professor of English and writer-in-residence at Pellissippi State Community College.

The series kicks off on Sunday, January 8, 2017 with a screening of the award-winning documentary Flannery O’Connor: Uncommon Grace followed by a discussion with its filmmakers, Bridget Kurt and Michael Jordan.

The series continues each Tuesday evening in January at Lawson McGhee Library with a discussion of one of O’Connor’s seminal short stories.

January 10: “Good Country People”
January 17: “A Displaced Person”​
Sunday, January 22, the series will screen John Huston’s Wise Blood.
January 24: “A Good Man is Hard to Find”
January 31: Conclusion

Despite her premature death at age 39, Flannery O’Connor left behind one of the most haunting and strikingly original bodies of work in 20th century literature. With the rural South as her backdrop, she brought to life a string of eccentric characters torn between their worldy ambitions and the need for a more enduring truth. While critics called her stories “brutal” and “grotesque,” O’Connor said, “All my stories are about the action of grace on a character who is not very willing to support it.”

The Lawson McGhee Library is the main library of Knox County Public Library in Knoxville, Tennessee. It is located at 500 West Church Avenue in downtown Knoxville.


Art on display in mayors’ offices

More than 60 works of art are on display in the office and anteroom of Knoxville City Mayor Madeline Rogero and in the hallway outside of Knox County Mayor Tim Burchett’s offices. The work will be displayed through May 2017.

“This exhibition is fun to arrange because we do not impose a particular theme or color-scheme,” said Liza Zenni, Executive Director of the Arts & Culture Alliance. “We simply include works that look best together as a whole and that complement the surroundings.”

The fresh mix of artwork includes oil, acrylic, watercolor, pastel, mixed media, photography, fiber, sculpture, and more from regional artists who are all individual members of the Arts & Culture Alliance, which serves and supports a diverse community of artists, arts organizations, and cultural institutions.

Most of the works in the mayors’ offices exhibition are for sale and may be purchased through the close of the exhibition.

Although the Mayor Rogero’s office isn’t open to the public for regular viewing, the anterooms and the other works on display on the 6th floor of the City-County Building are open Monday-Friday, 8:00 AM – 4:30 PM.

For more information, please contact the Arts & Culture Alliance at (865) 523-7543 or visit www.knoxalliance.com.

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Artists visit with Knoxville City Mayor Madeline Rogero and in the hallway outside of Knox County Mayor Tim Burchett’s offices. The artwork will be displayed through May 2017. Photo courtesy Arts and Culture Alliance.


Five Points project hosts meeting

Knoxville’s Community Development Corporation (KCDC) will hold a public meeting to present a site plan for Phase 3 redevelopment of the Walter P. Taylor Homes and Dr. Lee L. Williams Senior Complex to Five Points’ residents and community stakeholders on Thursday, Dec. 8, 2016 at 5:30 p.m. at the Walter P. Taylor Boys & Girls Club, 317 McConnell St.

KCDC’s design team of Barber McMurry Architects in Knoxville and Urban Design Associates, based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, will present the site plan for Phase 3 of the Five Points Master Plan, which will include 34 duplex and triplex buildings located at Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue and McConnell Street. The 98 one-, two- and three-bedroom units will be constructed to reflect the design and fabric of the existing community.

“This is a very exciting next step of the Five Points revitalization project. The proposed phase will serve as the new ‘front porch’ to Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue,” KCDC Board of Commissioners Chair Dan Murphy said. “The site plan is designed to create neighborhood connectivity, outdoor community spaces and housing amenities that will enhance the Five Points community.”

Phase 3 of the plan will also include a new playground and in the center of the community, open green space and park with proposed historical markers. The greenway will be prepared adjacent to the proposed improved Kenner Avenue for future connection to the City of Knoxville greenway system.

The total cost of the Five Points revitalization project is approximately $85 million and is estimated to take place over 10 to 12 years. The City of Knoxville has dedicated $8 million over a 10-year period to the project.

Since 1936, KCDC has been dedicated to enhancing the quality of life for the citizens of Knoxville and Knox County. KCDC’s mission is to improve and transform neighborhoods and communities by providing quality affordable housing, advancing development initiatives and fostering self-sufficiency.

For more information, call 865-403- 1100 or visit http://www.kcdc.org.


Orchid Award nominations sought

Keep Knoxville Beautiful is now accepting nominations from the public for its beautification awards, the Orchids. Since 1979, Keep Knoxville Beautiful has presented Orchid Awards to Knoxville and Knox County buildings and outdoor spaces that beautify and elevate the local landscape.

Orchid Awards will be granted in the following categories:

New Architecture

Redesign/Reuse

Restaurant/Cafe/Bar/Brewery

Outdoor Space (Parks, Patios, Rooftop Gardens, Neighborhoods, etc.)

Public Art (Murals, Sculptures, Signage, etc.)

Environmental Stewardship (Properties that incorporate renewable materials, energy efficiency, LEED certification and/or other sustainable building practices)

Anyone can nominate a location or outdoor public artwork by completing a simple online form on Keep Knoxville Beautiful’s website, keepknoxvillebeautiful.org, or by calling the office at 865-521- 6957. Private residences are not considered for this award. Properties that received an Orchid Award since 2007 are ineligible except in cases of major renovations. For a list of previous winners, visit the Keep Knoxville Beautiful website.

Nominations are due by Friday, December 16, 2016.

Keep Knoxville Beautiful is honored to have the East Tennessee Community Design Center serve as judges of the dozens of award nominations. Keep Knoxville Beautiful will announce the winners of the beautification awards at the annual Orchids Awards Dinner on Tuesday, March 7, 2017 at 6:00 at The Standard, 416 W. Jackson Avenue.

For more information, contact Keep Knoxville Beautiful at info@keepknoxvillebeautiful.org.

orchid-awards-sign


KKB hosts beautification project

Keep Knoxville Beautiful (KKB) will hold two beautification mobs to plant approximately 18,000 daffodil and tulip bulbs on November 19-20, 2016. Volunteers are needed for both days.

KKB will kick off the weekend on Saturday, November 19 by planting 2,000 daffodil bulbs next to the sidewalks of Sevierville Pike and E. Moody Avenue, near the end of the James White Parkway. Planting will take place from 9:00 AM – 3:00 PM and volunteers will receive a light breakfast and lunch. All tools and supplies will be provided, but volunteers are asked to bring a water bottle and wear clothes and shoes that can get dirty. Parking will be available at the intersection of Sevierville Pike and Compton Street, as well as on surrounding streets.

On Sunday, November 20 from Noon to 5:00 PM, KKB is partnering with the Town of Farragut to plant 16,000 tulip and daffodil bulbs at the Campbell Station Road I-40 Exit. KKB is seeking volunteers over the age of 12 to assist with the beautification mob. All volunteers will receive a lunch and a snack, and are also asked to bring a water bottle and wear clothes and shoes that can get dirty. Parking is available on the public road behind the Marathon Gas Station located at 800 N. Campbell Station Road.

“We’re at it again!” said Bob Graves, KKB board member and owner of sponsoring landscape design firm, Carex Design Group. “Last November, we planted over 60,000 daffodil bulbs on three I-275 exits with the help of over 220 volunteers. In the spring, the blooms carpeted the area with yellow and white, and we’re excited about seeing similar results on Sevierville Pike and the Campbell Station Road exit.”

Volunteers are encouraged to sign up for one or both of the Beautification Mobs at keepknoxvillebeautiful.org.

 


Pilot Pumpers raise $93k for UWay

Thanks to community members who purchased gas and other items at Pilot convenience stores, the 24th annual “Pilot Celebrity Pumpers” event raised a record-breaking $93,350 for the United Way of Greater Knoxville. The previous record of $90,400 was set in 2015.

From Oct. 10-12, 2016, local celebrities, including elected officials, media personalities and University of Tennessee sports figures, pumped gas and greeted customers to help Pilot raise funds for United Way. During the three-day event, Pilot donated five cents of every gallon of gas and 10 cents of every dollar spent in-store to United Way of Greater Knoxville’s 2016 campaign.

“The volunteer spirit is alive and well in East Tennessee,” said Jim Haslam II, founder and chairman of Pilot. “This event is a success because of the support of the community and our celebrity pumpers, who took time to visit our stores, pump gas and make purchases to benefit the United Way of Greater Knoxville. Thank you to everyone who helped make this donation possible.”

“Pilot Celebrity Pumpers” continues to be the organization’s single-largest special event fundraiser, helping United Way assist those most in need in our community. Since its inception, the special event has raised more than $1.2 million for the United Way of Greater Knoxville.

Celebrity pumpers distributed coupons for a free beverage during the event. Additionally, one lucky guest at each Pilot location and a few others using #pilotpumpers on social media won a $100 Pilot gas card.

Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero and Knox County Mayor Tim Burchett were among the celebrity pumpers, along with a host of Knoxville City Council and Knox County Commission members, school board members and media personalities. Well-known sports figures participating included Michael Annett, NASCAR driver for Pilot Flying J Racing; Holly Warlick, Lady Vols basketball head coach; and the UT Spirit Squad.

“Each year, we are amazed by the community support evident at ‘Pilot Celebrity Pumpers,’” United Way CEO Ben Landers said. “We are grateful to Pilot for sponsoring this event, to the celebrity pumpers who volunteered their time and to all the Pilot customers who participated. This donation will have a great impact on our community.”

Headquartered in Knoxville, Tennessee, Pilot operates 39 convenience stores in Tennessee.

mayor-madeline-rogero-pilot-pumpers

Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero pumps gas for a customer while serving as a “celebrity pumper” at the Pilot convenience store on Chapman Highway on Oct. 12, 2016. This year, “Pilot Celebrity Pumpers” raised $93,350 for the United Way of Greater Knoxville. Photo submitted.


Books donated to Knox Library

Copies of “The Final Season: The Perseverance of Pat Summitt” have been donated to Knox County Public Library. Summitt was the winningest coach in the history of NCAA Division I basketball. With 1,098 victories and eight national championships, she established the Lady Vols as the top women’s athletics program in the country.

Knox County Public Library offers more than 1.5 million books, periodicals, compact discs, films, audiobooks and downloadables through 19 locations across Knox County including one of the premier historical and genealogical collections in the Southeast.

“We are very grateful for this generous donation,” said Janet Drumheller, head of collection development for Knox County Public Library. “Pat Summitt will always be such an inspiration to our community, and we are so happy to share her story with our patrons through Maria’s book.”

Summitt was diagnosed with early onset dementia in 2011 and coached her final season in 2011-12. Summitt died June 28, 2016, at the age of 64.

The book was authored by Moxley Carmichael writer/editor Maria M. Cornelius. The public relations firm made the donation of the books to the library.

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Janet Drumheller and Mary Pom Claiborne, both of Knox County Public Library, accept 20 copies of “The Final Season: The Perseverance of Pat Summitt” from Alan Carmichael, far right, and Maria Cornelius, both of Moxley Carmichael. The books will be in circulation at every library branch and the main downtown facility. A book also will be placed in the permanent and non-circulated collection at McClung Museum. Photo submitted.


Time for planting dogwood trees

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. – Once again, Dogwood Arts encourages Knoxville to take part in the community-wide dogwood tree-planting day on Saturday, December 3, 2016 . As part of the Bazillion Blooms program, Dogwood Arts asks Knoxville communities to keep their neighborhoods and communities beautiful for years to come by planting not only dogwood trees, but flowering trees and shrubs, bulbs, and perennials during the Fall gardening season. Fall planting allows plants to develop a strong root system over the winter months, so they are strong for upcoming summer heat.

Since the inception of the Bazillion Blooms program in 2009, Dogwood Arts has been working towards a goal of planting 10,000 new trees in the Knoxville community in 10 years. Dogwood Arts is selling disease-resistant dogwood trees at dogwoodarts.com or by phone at (865) 637-4561 through November 18. These 3’ – 4’ bare-root trees are available for $25 each or five for $100.

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Trees ordered from Dogwood Arts must be picked up on Saturday, December 3, from 9 am to 12 pm at the UT Gardens off Neyland Drive. Trees will not be distributed at a later time or date. Photo submitted.

Since the initiation of Bazillion Blooms in 2009, Dogwood Arts, along with community and corporate partners, have planted more than 8,000 April-blooming, disease-resistant dogwood trees.

Bazillion Blooms, a program of Dogwood Arts, is sponsored by the ORNL Federal Credit Union. For more information, visit dogwoodarts.com or call Dogwood Arts at (865) 637-4561.

Dogwood Arts, presented by ORNL Federal Credit Union, is a 501(c)3 organization with a mission to promote and celebrate our region’s art, culture, and natural beauty.


New giraffe at Knoxville Zoo

A new giraffe arrived in Knoxville this month to join the city’s zoo herd in the Grasslands Africa habitat. Born in St. Paul, Minnesota, at the Como Park Zoo and Conservatory, one-year-old “Frances” comes to Knoxville on the recommendation of the Giraffe Species Survival Plan (SSP), which manages the breeding and social placement of all giraffes in zoos accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA). She will be a companion to the zoo’s two female giraffes, Patches and Lucille, and a potential mate for male Jumbe in a few years when she is fully grown.

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Frances, a new giraffe welcomed into the herd at Knoxville Zoo, is approximately 10 feet tall and weighs 740 pounds, and her smaller stature will make it easy for zoo-goers to identify her. Photo submitted.

Also this month, Zoo Knoxville welcomed a new Western lowland gorilla, a female who has been christened “Andi”.

The baby is named in honor of Andie Ray, a community visionary who loved gorillas and supported Zoo Knoxville’s work to save Western lowland gorillas from extinction. Andie passed away unexpectedly in December, 2015. She was instrumental in connecting the Ray family to gorillas at Zoo Knoxville. The Ray family named the first gorilla ever born at the zoo, Obi, whose name means “heart”, in June of 2015. The name “Andi” means “brave, strong, valiant and courageous”.

Zoo Knoxville is a nonprofit entity situated on 53 wooded acres just east of downtown Knoxville. Zoo Knoxville features exhibits of wild animals in natural habitats and is world renowned for its efforts in conservation and species survival. Zoo Knoxville is nationally accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) and is committed to the highest standards in animal care and well-being, ethics, conservation, and education.
Knoxville’s largest attraction, the zoo is open every day except Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. Currently, the zoo is open daily from 9:30 a.m. until 6:00 p.m. Admission and ticket sales stop one-hour before the zoo closes.

For more information visit zooknoxville.org.


Knox Heritage hosts fall events

Knox Heritage has a lot going on for fall 2016, including a “behind the scenes” look at the restoration of the Farragut Hotel in downtown Knoxville and the Big Bash at Buck Brothers celebrating the restoration of the historic Rexall Building in Lenior City.

Be among the first revelers to celebrate the return of the Buck Brothers Building on October 22, also known as the Waller or Rexall Building. This century-old icon on Broadway in downtown Lenoir City is being restored and we are celebrating its history as a mercantile business, drug store, and dance hall. Enjoy flavors from the past and present with dishes that are Loudon County favorites. Start the evening with a trip back in time at the Lenoir City Museum next door. Then progress into the exciting Buck Brothers project to meet and hear from the developers Diane Powell and Mark Uhran. Dine and dance the night away to a premier band.

farraguthotel

The “Behind the Scenes Tour” of the historic Farragut Hotel is October 21, 2016. This free event for Knox Heritage members will allow guests to see the $22 million transformation of this local icon while it’s underway thanks to Dover Development. The end result in 2017 will be a Hyatt Place Hotel that respects the historic character of the building. Festive beverages and savory snacks will be served.

Not a member of Knox Heritage yet? All memberships include your entire household and free admission to at least two “Behind the Scenes Tours” each year, our Preservation Awards Celebration in November, early access to Summer Suppers tickets, plus discounts at local retailers and restaurants and other perks.

For more information, email to rsvp@knoxheritage.org or call the Knox Heritage office (865) 523-8008.


Hickman named to KCDC board

Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero has appointed Kimberly Hickman, a participant in the Section 8 homeownership program, to a two-year term as resident commissioner of Knoxville’s Community Development Corporation (KCDC). The KCDC Board of Commissioners consists of seven members and includes a resident commissioner who is a current participant in one of KCDC’s affordable housing programs.

“Kimberly is the first resident commissioner from our Section 8 program,” KCDC Executive Director Art Cate said. “She will bring a unique perspective on the direct community impact of the approximately 4,000 Section 8 rental and homeownership vouchers that we manage and administer. Kimberly has a passion for helping others, and I know that her experience in the Section 8 program and as a homeowner will be a tremendous asset to the board.”

hickman-sm

Kimberly Hickman has been a resident of Knoxville since 2002 when she moved from Illinois with her family. Hickman was accepted to the Housing Choice Voucher Program and soon transitioned into the Section 8 Homeownership program. After participating in the required classes, she purchased her own home using the Section 8 voucher to pay a portion of her mortgage.

“I have been in the house with my children for almost two years. It took me five years total to save the money and complete the coursework while establishing credit,” said Hickman. “I have lived this process and that has given me a lot of insight that I hope to bring to this position.”

Hickman now resides in the East Knoxville community. She is a certified nursing assistant and the mother of two children, ages 15 and 16.

Hickman began her term on the KCDC Board of Commissioners on Aug. 1.

KCDC’s board oversees programs provided by the agency, including affordable public housing administration, redevelopment and rental assistance programs. Other board members are: Chair Daniel P. Murphy, professor of accounting at the University of Tennessee; Vice Chair Jacqueline Arthur, general manager of the Three Rivers Market; John Winemiller, law partner at Merchant & Gould; Bruce Anderson, general counsel at East Tennessee Children’s Hospital; Gloria Garner, retired vice president of internal/external affairs for the Knoxville Area Urban League; and Bob Whetsel, retired City of Knoxville director of redevelopment.

Since 1936, KCDC has been dedicated to enhancing the quality of life for the citizens of Knoxville. KCDC’s mission is to improve and transform neighborhoods and communities by providing quality affordable housing, advancing development initiatives and fostering self-sufficiency. For more information, visit http://www.kcdc.org.


Bike parking laws changing

The Knoxville-Knox County Metropolitan Planning Commission and the City of Knoxville have been updating the City’s parking ordinance to bring them into line with best practices from across the country. The proposed changes will be reviewed at the MPC meeting September 8, 2016 at 1:00 p.m. in the large assembly room of the City County Building located at 400 W Main St., Suite #403, in downtown Knoxville.

Highlights from the proposed changes:
The number of off-street parking spaces required has generally been reduced, and maximum limits set. (Section D of the draft updated ordinance)
Safe pedestrian travel to and through parking areas is addressed with standards for accessible pedestrian walkways in parking lots. (Section G)
Provisions for bicycle parking have been included in the updated ordinance. (Section I)
Landscaping requirements for parking lots have been enhanced. (Section J)

Please send comments on the proposed changes (whether you approve or disapprove of the changes) to the MPC Commissioners. In particular, they have received no comments on the bike parking requirements, even after having two public meetings.

Comments can be sent to commission@knoxmpc.org or Knoxville-Knox County MPC 400 Main St, Suite 403 Knoxville, TN 37902.


Chilhowee Park adds to staff

KNOXVILLE, TN – Chilhowee Park and Exposition Center has selected Greg Mackay as director and hired Michael Tarrant as event manager. As Chilhowee Park and Exposition Center director, Mackay will assist the general manager in overseeing the operations of the park and the services provided to events held at its facilities.

“Greg Mackay’s knowledge of Chilhowee will be an asset as we continue to serve our current clients and attract new events to the multipurpose venue,” General Manager Mary Bogert said. “We are pleased to have him on our team.”

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Greg Mackay served as the director of the Public Assembly Facilities Department for the City of Knoxville since 2013. Following an 11-year career as a realtor, he was a Knox County election commissioner from 1990 to 1998 and was the administrator of elections for Knox County from 2003 to 2011. Photo submitted. 

Mackay is a graduate of the Webb School of Knoxville and earned a bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of Tennessee. He serves as the chair of the university’s Political Science Advisory Board.

In the newly created position of event manager, Tarrant will handle event booking and coordination for the site, which includes a three-acre lake, bandstand, 4,500-seat amphitheater, 57,100-square- foot exhibition hall, barns, arenas, playground and picnic shelters.

“Michael Tarrant will help us further improve client service for events at Chilhowee,” Bogert said. “As a longtime resident of East Knoxville, he is a great addition to our team to assist our efforts in connecting the park and exposition center to the surrounding neighborhood and business partners.”

Tarrant

Michael Tarrant is a graduate of Austin-East High School and earned a bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of Tennessee. In his spare time, Tarrant enjoys reading and volunteering with Edgewood Chapel AME Zion Church, where his father serves as pastor. Photo submitted.

Chilhowee Park and Exposition Center is an 81-acre, multi-use venue owned by the City of Knoxville. It is located blocks away from interstate access and minutes from downtown Knoxville. The facility includes a three-acre lake, bandstand, 4,500-seat amphitheater, 57,100-square- foot exhibition hall, barns, arenas, playground and picnic shelters. Chilhowee also is home to the Tennessee Valley Fair.


Young-Williams names Testerman CEO

KNOXVILLE, TN – The Young-Williams Animal Center board of directors has appointed Janet Testerman as interim CEO. Testerman is a longtime supporter of the shelter, serving on the board for nearly five years. She also adopted her Dachshund, Lollie, from Young-Williams Animal Center in 2014.

Janet Testerman

“Janet has been an active, passionate advocate and thoughtful counselor for Young-Williams Animal Center for many years,” said Dr. Kristi Lively, chair of Young-Williams Animal Center board of directors. “Recognizing her talents, dedication and vision, the board confidently selected Janet as interim CEO. We know she will be a forward-thinking leader for the shelter and that she will serve the best interests of the animals, the organization and our community.”

Janet Testerman succeeds Jeff Ashin, who has resigned.

Young-Williams Animal Center reminds the community to please spay and neuter your pets.

Young-Williams Animal Center takes in an average of 12,000 animals every year making it the official animal shelter for Knox County and the City of Knoxville. The center is a nonprofit organization, community-supported through public and private donations, that turns no animal away and is dedicated to the sheltering and placement of animals, general animal welfare, and public education of companion animal issues.


Marble Springs hosts stargazing

Venus and Jupiter are two of the brightest planets visible in the night sky. On the evening of August 27, 2016, Marble Springs State Historic Site will be hosting a Stargazing Workshop to view the conjunction of these two bright planets. The workshop will begin at 9:30pm in the cottage with a video/lecture on Venus and Jupiter before moving to the grounds to view the conjunction. The two planets will be visually very close together, appearing only 0.06 degrees apart. This workshop will conclude at 11:30pm.

Participation in stargazing events is a $1 donation. In the event of inclement weather, the video/lecture portion will still take place. Details are subject to change.

This workshop will take place at Marble Springs State Historic Site at 1220 W. Gov. John Sevier Highway, Knoxville, TN 37920. For more information email info@marblesprings.net or call (865)573-5508.

Programming assistance for this event is provided by Knox County. Marble Springs is funded under an agreement with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Tennessee Historical Commission, and supplemented by additional funds raised by the Governor John Sevier Memorial Association.

About Marble Springs State Historic Site

Marble Springs State Historic Site is the last remaining home of John Sevier. Born in Virginia in 1745, John Sevier made a name for himself as a Revolutionary War Hero during the Battle of Kings Mountain (1780), a key player and Governor of the short-lived State of Franklin (1784-1788), and ultimately was elected to serve as the first Governor of the State of Tennessee (1796).

Marble Springs was the approximate 350-acre farm that Sevier lived on from 1801-1815, the last years of his life. Sevier named his farm Marble Springs because of the Tennessee Rose Marble that was quarried on site and the natural springs that flowed on the property.

While visiting Marble Springs, guests have the opportunity to tour several historic structures that are designed to represent various aspects of John Sevier’s life and times. These structures include: the Tavern, Loom House, Smoke House, Spring House and the John Sevier Cabin and detached kitchen.

For more information, call (865)573-5508.


Art Market seeks new members

Art Market Gallery in downtown Knoxville is currently accepting applications for a Sunday, August 28, 2016 membership jury. Acceptance for membership is determined by a jury of six active gallery members and is based on the quality of the applicant’s work; the applicant’s ability to be involved in a cooperative effort; as well as, the needs of the gallery. Currently the gallery is accepting applications from artists in 2D & 3D.

Prospective members may deliver four pieces of their work and completed application form with $30 jury fee to the gallery at 422 South Gay Street in downtown Knoxville.

Delivery may be made 11:00 am – 5:30 pm Tuesday, August 23 through Saturday, August 27th. Instructions and an application form are available at www.artmarketgallery.net. Prospective members are encouraged to read the application form carefully. If you have questions or need additional information contact, Mary Saylor at 678­596­4696 or mesaylor@gmail.com.

The Art Market Gallery, an artists’ cooperative, has provided a venue for a range of traditional to contemporary art and fine crafts for thirty years. Currently the gallery represents over 60 regional artists. Works include paintings in watercolor, oil, acrylic, pastel, mixed media; drawings; photographs; woodcuts, intaglio monoprints and other print techniques; collage; weaving, felting, silk painting and other fabric techniques; ceramics; woodworking; jewelry; sculpture; and works in glass. Potential applicants are encouraged to visit the gallery to get a sense of the fine quality of the work and the cooperative work environment.


Ice Cream Social for community planners

Knoxville, TN – An Ice Cream Sunday Social and Community Engagement Session will be held Sunday, July 17, 2016 from 1:00-3:30 pm. The East Tennessee Community Design Center (ETCDC) and the Knoxville-Knox County Metropolitan Planning Commission (MPC) will host the event to gather suggestions for the East Knox County Community Plan, being prepared by MPC. It will be at the Carter Senior Center, 9036 Asheville Hwy.

All interested groups, including residents, landowners, community representatives, business owners, and county officials, are encouraged to attend. The information gathered will provide important input for this planning process.

Community members will have the chance to review past plans, consider areas to preserve and for potential future development, identify challenges today, vision for tomorrow, planning priorities, and participate in a Visual Preference Survey. There will be a prize drawing at the end of the session.

East Knox County has wonderful assets such as historic communities, long-standing farms, beautiful vistas, open space, and is flanked by two scenic rivers. Growth is likely, but how future developments impact the environment and benefit the community is yet to be defined. A goal of the East Knox County Community Plan is to ensure that community members are engaged in the process and able to make suggestions, which impact the quality of any future growth. The plan will be a realistic and effective community resource with a set of concise action steps for implementation.

A community representative stakeholder committee has been established to help with the process of gathering input and evaluating recommendations. The group includes representatives from several East Knoxville communities along with key elected and appointed county officials.

Please RSVP via email to leslie@communitydc.org or call (865) 525-9945. Cruze Farm Ice Cream will be served.


Discount pet adoptions offered

KNOXVILLE, TN – Young-Williams Animal Center will host its 2nd annual “Pet-riotic” event on Monday, July 4, 2016 with adoption fees for dogs ages 4 and older set at just $4. Spay/neuter surgeries for dogs will also be $40 off the regular low-cost option of $70.

“Last year, many families embraced their ‘pet-riotic’ spirit, and we were able to place several shelter animals in loving homes,” Young-Williams Animal Center CEO Jeff Ashin said. “While some adopters prefer puppies, adult dogs make wonderful pets. Many of them come to us with some training, and that maturity helps them make a smoother transition to a new home.”

2016-06 YWAC July 4th adoption special Daylilly

In addition to the adoption special, Young-Williams is offering $40 off the price of all spay and neuter surgeries. Pet owners must schedule an appointment by July 1 to receive the reduced spay/neuter rates of $5 for cats and $30 for dogs.

Ashin emphasized how important it is to have these special promotions during the summer when the center experiences its highest intake of animals.

“Spaying or neutering helps control the pet overpopulation in the community, and over time, helps decrease the number of homeless animals entering the shelter,” Ashin said. “The $40 discount on spay/neuter surgeries complements our $4 adoption special for homeless dogs already in the shelter and looking for a forever family.

“The Fourth of July is a time of celebration when many people have the day off from work. We hope individuals and families will consider adopting a dog as part of their ‘pet-riotic’ activities and use the holiday to find a furry family member, get pet supplies and introduce a great dog to a new home.”

Every animal adopted during the special promotion will receive the services covered by the regular adoption fees, which include a veterinary exam, spay/neuter surgery, some standard vaccinations, a microchip with registration and more.

The adoption special will be available at Young-Williams Animal Center at 3201 Division St., off Sutherland Avenue, and the Young-Williams Animal Village at 6400 Kingston Pike on Bearden Hill. The facilities will be open during regular business hours of noon-6 p.m.

To learn more about Young-Williams Animal Center, visit www.young-williams.org.


Marble Springs celebrates July 4th

Marble Springs State Historic Site will celebrate the Fourth of July with a “Let Freedom Ring” Bell Ringing ceremony. This event is in collaboration with the General Henry Knox Chapter of the Sons of the Revolution and local reenacting community. This event will take place from 10am until 4pm on July 4th and is free to the public, though donations are appreciated.

Activities will include a bell ringing ceremony, a freedom pole, and a long hunter camp. For more information, please call (865)-573- 5508, email info@marblesprings.net or visit www.marblesprings.net. Details subject to change.

All activities will take place at the Marble Springs State Historic Site at 1220 W. Governor John Sevier Highway, Knoxville, TN 37920.

Programming assistance for this event is provided by Knox County. Marble Springs is funded under an agreement with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Tennessee Historical Commission, and supplemented by additional funds raised by the Governor John Sevier Memorial Association.

Marble Springs State Historic Site is the last remaining home of John Sevier. Born in Virginia in 1745, John Sevier made a name for himself as a Revolutionary War Hero during the Battle of Kings Mountain (1780), a key player and Governor of the short-lived State of Franklin (1784-1788), and ultimately was elected to serve as the first Governor of the State of Tennessee (1796).

Marble Springs was the approximate 350-acre farm that Sevier lived on from 1801-1815, the last years of his life. Sevier named his farm Marble Springs because of the Tennessee Rose Marble that was quarried on site and the natural springs that flowed on the property.

While visiting Marble Springs, you will have the opportunity to tour several historic structures that are designed to represent various aspects of John Sevier’s life. These structures include: the Tavern, Loom House, Smoke House, Spring House, the John Sevier Cabin and detached kitchen.


Knox Library Book Sale is June 25-28

Knox County Public Library’s 2016 Annual Used Book Sale will be held June 25–28, 2016 at the Jacob Building at Chilhowee Park in downtown Knoxville, Tennessee.

Thousands of beautiful used books will be on sale to benefit the Knox County Public Library. From Members Only Day on June 25 through Bag Sale Day on June 28, this year’s sale offers great book bargains for everyone.

Knoxville residents can support Friends of the Knox County Public Library in 2016 by registering a Kroger Plus Card and choosing Friends as the recipient.

Participants earn points for the library with every purchase that will be converted into dollars of support for Friends. Participants still receive Kroger Plus Card discounts just like before, and benefit the library at the same time.

Follow these easy steps to link your card to Friends: Register your card online—create an account, then enter your email, favorite store, and Kroger Plus Card number. At the bottom of your Account Summary, click Enroll under Community Rewards, and either enter our Kroger Non Profit number (65466) or just search for Friends of the Knox County Public Library.

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Enjoy Jewish traditional foods

KNOXVILLE, TN – You might be familiar with bagels and lox, or challah bread. But what about shakshuka or mandlebrot? On May 22, 2016 the greater Knoxville community will have a chance to try both of these Jewish foods, and many more, at the first-ever “Knoshville” Jewish Food Festival. (The event’s name is a play on the Yiddish word “nosh,” which means to snack or nibble.)

bagels&lox

“Knoshville will bring together every Jewish organization in the Knoxville and Oak Ridge area, in celebration and appreciation of Jewish foods and cuisine. The entire community is invited to attend, nosh with us, and learn about the foods that bring us together,” says Deborah Oleshansky, Executive Director of the Knoxville Jewish Alliance. “It’s going to be very fun, and also very delicious.”

Knoshville Jewish Food Festival
Sunday, May 22 • 11:00AM – 3:00PM
Arnstein Jewish Community Center (AJCC), 6800 Deane Hill Drive
Admission is free; minimum food purchase of $10.00
The entire community is invited to attend and nosh! (RAIN OR SHINE.)

Menu items to include:
Bagels and lox (smoked salmon); Shakshuka (Middle Eastern spicy baked egg dish); Bundt cakes; “black and white” cookies; mandlebrot (it’s like biscotti, but better) potato latkes (pancakes); potato knishes (delicious filling covered with dough and baked or fried); matzah ball soup (dumplings in broth); challah (Jewish egg bread)

Please note: In respect of kashrut, the kosher Jewish dietary laws and traditions, no meat or poultry items will be available at this event. Dairy, fish and vegetarian items and some gluten-free items will be available. The Knoxville Jewish Alliance looks forward to announcing a kosher deli event in Fall 2016. Stay tuned!

Participating organizations: Knoxville Jewish Alliance, Heska Amuna Synagogue, Temple Beth El, Knoxville Jewish Day School, Chabad of Knoxville, Jewish Congregation of Oak Ridge, the local chapters of Hadassah and BBYO, and the Young Jewish Adults of Knoxville.

Knoshville will also feature Israeli dancing, music, and an art gallery. An AJCC pool open house will occur from 1:00PM – 5:00PM; pool use is free to the community.


Celebrate Cinco de Gato

KNOXVILLE – Celebrate “Cinco de Gato” on Thursday, May 5, 2016, when adoption fees for adult cats and senior cats will be just $5 at both Young-Williams Animal Center, 3201 Division St., off Sutherland Avenue, and the Young-Williams Animal Village, 6400 Kingston Pike on Bearden Hill.

“Spring marks the beginning of kitten season,” said Jeff Ashin, Young-Williams Animal Center CEO. “By offering this adoption special, thanks to Strata-G’s generous support, we’ll be able to adopt more cats and make room for new ones as intake increases.”

2016-04 YWAC Cinco de Gato Chloe, 5 yrs

“Cinco de Gato” is a festive promotion timed with the popular Cinco de Mayo to help raise awareness of the need for spring adoptions. Photo submitted.

Every adopted animal will receive the services covered by the standard fees, which include veterinary physical exam, spay/neuter surgery, some standard vaccinations, microchip with registration and more. The regular fees range from $50 to $100.

The promotion is sponsored by Strata-G, a Knoxville-based environmental services firm.

Young-Williams Animal Center, the official animal shelter for Knox County and the City of Knoxville, reminds the community to please spay and neuter pets.

 


South College hosts job fair

KNOXVILLE, TN – South College will host their annual job fair on Thursday, May 19, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., for its students and the community on campus at 3904 Lonas Drive in Knoxville.

“Seeking employment can be confusing, time-consuming and tiring,” said Gary Taylor, South College career services coordinator. “Having so many employers in one location should make the process much easier, and we hope that job seekers will take advantage of this opportunity to meet and speak with area recruiters.”

Human resource officers and recruiters will be on-site to review resumes and discuss employment opportunities with attendees. The representatives are seeking qualified individuals in health care, business, legal studies and other industries.

“Treat this career fair and any other opportunity like you would a job interview,” Taylor said. “In addition to an updated resume, it’s helpful to have a brief description of your work experience and the type of opportunity you’re currently seeking.”

Companies scheduled to participate in the job fair include: AFLAC, American Red Cross, Blount County Sheriff’s Office, Cellular Sales of Knoxville, City of Knoxville Civil Service Department, Clayton Homes, Covenant Health, Dollywood, EmployBridge, Homewatch CareGivers, Knoxville Police Department, Medical Solutions, Morristown Police Department, PhysAssist, Resource Accounting, Renaissance Terrace Assisted Living, RetireNDignity, Senior Citizens Home Assistance Service (SCHAS), Summit View of Farragut, Talbots, Tennessee Bureau of Investigation, Tennessee Highway Patrol, Tennessee National Guard, University of Tennessee, University Physicians’ Association, US Foods, U.S. Navy, Vanderbilt Mortgage and Finance, Wellmont Health System and Westmoreland Health and Rehab Center.

About South College

South College is a private institution accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC) to offer programs at the doctorate, master’s, baccalaureate, and associate levels.


House Mountain offers great hiking

CELEBRATE KNOXVILLE – If you’re looking for a great place to enjoy the gorgeous spring weather in East Tennessee, you’ll want to hike House Mountain, a 500-acre natural area located in Knox County approximately eight miles from Knoxville. The hiking trails are short, but steep, challenging, and rewarding. The 2,100-foot crest of House Mountain provides great views of the Unakas and Cumberlands some 30 miles away, or northeast to the adjacent Clinch Mountain.

According to Knox County’s Department of Parks and Recreation, before erosion by Big Flat Creek, “the gently dipping bedrock layers underlying House Mountain once extended to Clinch Mountain, whose base lies approximately two and half miles to the northeast. The bedrock structure represents a large synclinal fold that formed during the Appalachian mountain building event called the Alleghenian Orogeny.”

The western trail to the crest is .8 miles and the eastern trail is 1.5 miles. The western trail is narrow, steep, and has a few turns that require careful negotiating. Both trails are connected at the top by the wider Crest Trail that is 1.5 miles long.

HouseMountainhikers

Many hikers bring their dogs with them on the trail on House Mountain. From time to time, a courteous wait is needed to allow hikers coming down and hikers going up enough room to pass one another. Photo by Celebrate Knoxville.

In a few places, the great sandstone boulders serve as resting places or picnic spots for hikers or artists sketching the chestnut oaks and mountain pines. Photographers are often seen kneeling in the moist dirt by streambeds to catch a close-up of wildflowers. The north-facing slopes support a forest of sugar maple, tulip poplar, ash, and buckeye.

Don’t forget the binoculars: House Mountain is also a favorite place for birdwatchers. Migrating hawks and warblers can be observed from the mountain. Ruffed grouse, pileated woodpeckers, scarlet tanagers, wild turkeys, and more than one hundred additional species of birds have been observed on the mountain.

Gurgling from the cool streams provide a musical backdrop for hikers making their way up the slopes. House Mountain is drained by several unnamed tributaries of Roseberry Creek and by Hogskin and Brice Branches, which divide it from the 1,500 feet high McAnnally Ridge, which lies to the east and south.

To get to House Mountain from Knoxville, Tennessee, take I-40 East. Exit on U.S. Highway 11W (Rutledge Pike) and go north and east on Rutledge Pike. After about 10 miles, look for the “House Mountain State Park” sign on the right side of the highway and then turn left on Idumea Road. Turn left on Hogskin Road. The parking area is less than a mile on the right. Restrooms are available next to the parking lot. There is no admission fee to hike the trails.

Benches and signage along the trails are provided in memory of John Evans, a Scout leader and founding member/active volunteer for Friends of House Mountain. Enjoy the trails and remember to Leave No Trace.

Editor’s Update April 2017: If you’re interested in more hiking opportunities, Brian Bradshaw has just published “Top 50 Long Distance Hiking Trails In The USA”. You can check it out here: https://bootbomb.com/info/hiking-trails/top-50-long-distance-hiking-trails-usa/

–Laura Long/CelebrateKnoxville.com


Knoxville welcomes new luxury hotel

KNOXVILLE – With a champagne toast, Nick Cazana, Commercial & Investment Properties president, has formally announced the redevelopment of the former state office building at 531 Henley St. as The Tennessean Personal Luxury Hotel and Residences. The facility is scheduled to open in 2017.

2016-04-07 The Tennessean toast

Located in downtown Knoxville, The Tennessean is close to shopping and dining spots of Market Square, the city’s art and theater districts, World’s Fair Park and the University of Tennessee. Pictured from left: Knox County Mayor Tim Burchett; Nick Cazana; Kim Bumpas, Visit Knoxville president; and Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero. Photo submitted.

The City of Knoxville recently completed a covered walkway from the property to the Knoxville Convention Center and renovated the pedestrian bridge over Henley Street.

“The development of The Tennessean continues the renaissance along the city’s largest downtown green space at World’s Fair Park,” Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero said. “It also is an important connector between downtown, Fort Sanders and the University of Tennessee campus.”


Young-Williams elects officers

KNOX COUNTY – Young-Williams Animal Center recently elected the new officers and announced the new members of the 2016 board of directors.

“We are so fortunate to have such active and engaged board members that are willing to donate their time and talent to help serve our animals and community,” said Jeff Ashin, Young-Williams Animal Center CEO. “Our staff is working hard to continue to provide the best medical and shelter services for the 12,000 animals we take in each year, as well as reduce the number of unwanted animals in our community through the Spay/Neuter Solutions program and raise additional funds to care for the animals. None of this would be possible without our board’s leadership, and we are excited for what this year will bring.”

The Board Chair is Kristi Lively, DVM, DABVP of Village Veterinary Clinic. Newly elected board officers include Janet Testerman (VChair), Bob Thomas (Secretary), April Harris (Treasurer). New Members include Brad Van Der Veen, Allison Klesse Smith, Natalie Stair, and Melissa White.
Young-Williams Animal Center reminds the community to please spay and neuter your pets. The Young-Williams Animal Center is the official animal shelter for Knox County and the City of Knoxville. The center is a nonprofit organization, community-supported through public and private donations, that turns no animal away and is dedicated to the sheltering and placement of animals, general animal welfare, and public education of companion animal issues.

Young-Williams Animal Center is located off Sutherland Avenue at the entrance to John Tarleton Park at 3201 Division St. Young-Williams Animal Village is located at 6400 Kingston Pike adjacent to Deane Hill Drive. Both locations are open seven days a week from noon-6 p.m.

For more information about Young-Williams Animal Center, call 865-215-6599.


Free tax workshops offered

NASHVILLE – The Tennessee Department of Revenue will be holding a free tax workshop for new businesses in Knoxville in January 2016.

The Knoxville workshop will take place January 13, 2016 from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Department’s Knoxville regional office, located on the third floor of 7175 Strawberry Plains Pike.

Similar workshops are taking place in Chattanooga, Johnson City, Memphis and Nashville. These free workshops are designed to assist those encountering business-related taxes for the first time. Tax specialists from various local and state agencies will provide the basic information needed to comply with registration and tax requirements.

During the session, attendees will have the opportunity to listen to these tax specialists, ask questions and receive materials explaining tax responsibilities. Areas of discussion will include business tax, sales and use tax, and tax enforcement procedures.

Space is limited and registration is required. For more information, please call (800) 342-1003 (toll-free inside Tennessee) or (615) 253-0600 (local Nashville-area and outside Tennessee).

The Department of Revenue is responsible for the administration of state tax laws and motor vehicle title and registration laws and the collection of taxes and fees associated with those laws. The Department collects about 87 percent of total state revenue. During the 2015 fiscal year, it collected $12.6 billion in state taxes and fees and more than $2.4 billion in taxes and fees for local governments.

To learn more about the Department, visit www.tn.gov/revenue.


Young-Williams offers holiday special

Young-Williams Animal Center and the Humane Society of the Tennessee Valley are partnering for a “Home for the Holidays” adoption special, sponsored by Grayson Subaru. From Dec. 21-23, 2015 all pets at Young-Williams Animal Center and the Humane Society locations will be $25.

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The agencies will kick off the adoption event with a tree lighting ceremony at Young-Williams Animal Village of Knoxville on Monday, Dec. 21. The adoption prices will be available at Young-Williams Animal Center, 3201 Division St., off Sutherland Ave; Young-Williams Animal Village, 6400 Kingston Pike on Bearden Hill; and the Humane Society of the Tennessee Valley, 6717 Kingston Pike.

Every adopted animal will receive the services covered by the regular adoption fee, which includes a veterinary physical exam, spay/neuter surgery, some standard vaccinations, microchip with registration and more.

The Young-Williams Animal Center is the official animal shelter for Knox County and the City of Knoxville. The center is a nonprofit organization, community-supported through public and private donations, that turns no animal away and is dedicated to the sheltering and placement of animals, general animal welfare, and public education of companion animal issues.

Young-Williams Animal Center is located off Sutherland Avenue at the entrance to John Tarleton Park at 3201 Division St. Young-Williams Animal Village is located at 6400 Kingston Pike adjacent to Deane Hill Drive. Both locations are open seven days a week from noon-6 p.m.

To learn more about Young-Williams Animal Center, visit www.young-williams.org.


Survey studies arts and culture

The Arts Mean Business. That is the message being delivered today by the Arts & Culture Alliance of Greater Knoxville, who announced it has joined the Arts & Economic Prosperity 5, a national study measuring the economic impact of nonprofit arts and culture organizations and their audiences.

In Greater Knoxville, the research study is being conducted by Americans for the Arts (AFTA), the nation’s nonprofit organization advancing the arts and arts education in partnership with the Arts & Culture Alliance and the Tennessee Arts Commission, the state’s arts agency. This is the fifth national study over the past 20 years to measure the impact of arts and culture spending on local jobs, income paid to local residents, and revenue generated to local and state governments. This will be the Alliance’s first time to participate.

As one of nearly 300 study partners across all 50 states plus the District of Columbia, the Alliance will collect economic impact data from local nonprofits that offer arts and culture programming both formal and informal. “This study will show how nonprofit arts and culture are an important industry in our community—employing people locally, purchasing goods and services from local merchants, and helping to drive tourism and economic development,” said Liza Zenni, Executive Director of the Arts & Culture Alliance.

The Alliance will also collect surveys from attendees at arts and cultural events. Previous national studies have shown that the average attendee spends $24.60 per person, per event, beyond the cost of admission. Those studies have also shown that, on average, 32 percent of arts attendees travel from outside the county in which the arts event took place, and that those cultural tourists typically spend nearly $40 per person—generating important revenue for local businesses and demonstrating how the arts drive revenue for other businesses in the community.

Surveys will be collected throughout calendar year 2016. The results of the study will be released in June of 2017.

 


Nominations sought for Orchid awards

Keep Knoxville Beautiful is now accepting nominations from the public for its beautification awards, the Orchids. Since 1979, Keep Knoxville Beautiful has presented Orchid Awards to Knoxville and Knox County buildings and outdoor spaces that beautify and elevate the local landscape.

Orchid Awards will be granted in the following six categories:

  1. New Architecture
  2. Redesign/Reuse
  3. Restaurant/Cafe/Bar/Brewery
  4. Environmental Stewardship
  5. Outdoor Space
  6. Public Art

“This year we revamped a few of the categories to reflect some of the changes happening in our dynamic city,” said Patience Melnik, executive director of Keep Knoxville Beautiful, “We added the restaurant/brewery, environmental stewardship, and public art categories to celebrate these growing elements in our community.”

Anyone can nominate a location or outdoor public artwork by completing a simple online form on Keep Knoxville Beautiful’s website, keepknoxvillebeautiful.org, or by calling the office at 865-521-6957.

Private residences are not considered for this award. Properties can win only once except in cases of major renovations. Nominations are due by Friday, January 8, 2015.

 


Kayak company locates in Knox County

Lifetime Products, Inc. officials have announced the company will locate new manufacturing and distribution operations in Knox County. The leader in blow-molded plastic products will invest $115 million and create 500 jobs.

“We spent over a year researching different locations on the East Coast. After meeting with local state and economic groups, Tennessee was obviously the best option,” Richard Hendrickson, president and CEO Lifetime Products, Inc. said. “We are excited to facilitate the creation of U.S. manufacturing jobs and opportunities for the people of the Knoxville area and the state of Tennessee.”

Lifetime Products is the leading manufacturer of blow-molded plastics products. Its products range from plastic folding tables and chairs, basketball hoops and outdoor sheds to kayaks and paddleboards. Lifetime was started in 1986 with 15 employees and now employs over 2,700 people worldwide.

Lifetime’s new manufacturing and distribution operations will be located in the former GE building in Knox County. The existing building is 360,000 square feet and the company plans to double the size by adding a new building to the existing structure.

The facility will produce Lifetime’s water sports line that includes kayaks and paddleboards as well as its outdoor children’s playset line. With this new facility, the company will be able to meet its customers’ increased demand for Lifetime’s products.

Lifetime plans to have the facility operational by summer 2017.


Bazillion Blooms day is Dec 5

Bazillion Blooms, Knoxville’s community-wide dogwood tree-planting day takes place on Saturday, December 5, 2015. Dogwood Arts is once again asking Knoxville residents to keep their neighborhoods and communities beautiful for years to come by planting not only dogwood trees, but flowering trees and shrubs, bulbs, and perennials during the Fall gardening season.

Fall planting allows plants to develop a strong root system over the winter months, so they are strong for next year’s summer heat.

Trees are purchased for $25 each (or five for $100) ordered from Dogwood Arts by November 13, 2015. The trees must be picked up on Saturday, December 5, from 9:00am to 12:00pm at the UT Gardens parking lot off Neyland Drive. Trees will not be distributed later.

For more information, call Dogwood Arts at (865) 637-4561.

Erin Donovan Bazillion Blooms

Erin Donovan plants a dogwood tree for Bazillion Blooms, an annual community tree planting event in Knoxville, Tennessee. Photo courtesy Dogwood Arts.


Movies on the Square begins Sept 11

Knox County Public Library is once again hosting Movies on the Square in downtown Knoxville, from Sept. 11 through October 16, 2015. Bring a lawn chair or blanket and enjoy a movie under the stars in Market Square.

Patrons can park free on weekends and after 6pm every night in over 5,000 spaces in the following Knoxville municipal garages:

Locust Street Garage
Market Square Garage
State Street Garage
Promenade Garage
Walnut Street Garage (new!)
Dwight Kessel Garage
Jackson Ave Surface Lot – corner of Gay & Jackson
Viaduct Surface Lot – under the interstate off E. Jackson

And the 2015 Movies on the Square lineup is:
September 11: Driving Miss Daisy (PG, 1989)

September 18: Rio (G, 2011)

September 25: Night at the Museum (PG, 2006)

October 2: No Movie – Free Black Lillies concert

October 9: Hotel Transylvania (PG, 2012)

October 16: A League of Their Own (PG, 1992)


Event raises funds for historic Knoxville

The Historic Homes of Knoxville are pleased to invite the public to a luncheon on Thursday, October 1, 2015, at 11:30 AM at The Foundry to celebrate the founding of the City of Knoxville 224 years ago. Knoxville’s key leaders will come together to celebrate and promote the city and its most precious properties, including Blount Mansion, Crescent Bend, Ramsey House, James White’s Fort, Mabry-Hazen, Marble Springs State Historic Site, and Historic Westwood.

Tennessee Department of Tourist Development commissioner Kevin Triplett will be the featured speaker. Triplett, was appointed to Gov. Bill Haslam’s cabinet as commissioner of the Department of Tourist Development in March of 2015. Triplett, 49, was most recently vice president of public affairs for Bristol Motor Speedway. Prior to joining BMS in 2005, he worked in various roles for NASCAR, ultimately serving as managing director of business operations, guiding the operation and administration of NASCAR’s Sprint Cup Series, Nationwide Series, and Camping World Truck Series. He has twice been named one of NASCAR’s “25 Most Influential” by The Charlotte Observer.

Proceeds from the luncheon will benefit the Historic Homes. Purchase tickets by calling 865-523-7543 by September 24.


Knoxville Urban League donates shoes

Thanks to the efforts of the Knoxville Area Urban League and Enterprise Rent-A-Car, more than 1,200 children received new tennis shoes and school supplies at the 13th annual Shoes for School held this past weekend.

The event at Caswell Park was timed for the start of the new academic year, giving the children a boost of confidence and sending them into the classroom on the right foot. Each child received shoes and an assortment of school supplies.

“Shoes for Schools is one of the Knoxville Area Urban League’s signature community events, and it’s one of my favorite days at work,” said Phyllis Y. Nichols, president and CEO of the Knoxville Area Urban League. “The joy we share with the children as we give them new shoes and school supplies is irreplaceable for us and for them.”

2015-08 Knoxville Area Urban League Shoes for Schools

The Urban League, Enterprise and other sponsors hosted a festive atmosphere with food, games and inflatables provided by booth sponsors representing area businesses, nonprofit organizations, church groups and others. The Shoes For School event is a community effort and something that families and volunteers eagerly anticipate each year. Photo submitted.

“We are so grateful for our staff and sponsors who work so hard to make this event successful each year,” Nichols said.

Since 1968, the Knoxville Area Urban League has assisted disadvantaged people attain social and economic stability and self-sufficiency through direct services and advocacy. The League works to provide a skilled and diverse workforce; to increase homeownership; to support economic and small business development, and to enhance education efforts for youth. The Knoxville Area Urban League is a United Way partner agency and affiliate of the National Urban League. The League’s work and results are evident in the lives of the over 8,000 people it impacts each year.

For more information, call 865-524-5511 or visit www.thekaul.org.


Tradeshow highlights connections

Small and midsized businesses interested in working with local governments can meet with up to 30 municipalities in one stop at the East Tennessee Purchasing Association’s (ETAP) 10th Annual Business Matching and Tradeshow event on Thursday, July 16, 2015.

From 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at Rothchild Conference and Catering Center, attendees will be able to connect with cities, counties and other agencies to get information about their processes and available contracts.

“It’s really beneficial for both parties,” said Penny Owens, business matching chair for ETAP. “The businesses are able to meet with all of their potential customers in one stop instead of traveling all over East Tennessee, and the governmental buyers are able to meet with all the vendors in one place, too.”

In addition to the tradeshow, educational seminars will be available for attendees. The State of Tennessee will host a session about how to do business with its departments, and the Small Business Administration will share information about its lending program and the Women-Owned Small Businesses government contracting program. U.S. Bank will lead a session on financing for small businesses.

Registration is free for attendees. To register, visit www.etapnews.org.


Celebrate July 4th at Marble Springs

The public is invited as Marble Springs State Historic Site celebrates the Fourth of July 2015. Activities include a “Let Freedom Ring” bell ringing ceremony at 2 p.m., Revolutionary War Stories, and a Raising of a Liberty Pole. This event is in collaboration with the General Henry Knox Chapter Sons of the Revolution and local reenacting community.

This event will take place from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. on July 4 and is free to the public, though donations are appreciated.

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All Fourth of July 2015 activities take place at the Marble Springs State Historic Site: 1220 West Governor John Sevier Highway, in Knoxville. Photo courtesy Marble Springs Historic Site.

Programming assistance for this event is provided by Knox County. Marble Springs is funded under an agreement with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Tennessee Historical Commission, and supplemented by additional funds raised by the Governor John Sevier Memorial Association.

Information found at 865-573-5508.

 


Highlands benefits Knox Heritage

To commemorate the Highlands Grill’s 5th Anniversary, Tom Weiss is hosting an elegant dinner party in support of historic preservation. The event takes place June 17, 2015, and all proceeds will support the Knox Heritage J. Allen Smith Endangered Properties Fund used to save threatened historic places across the region. Live jazz, delicious food and wine pairings will create a special evening to remember.

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Menu

Starter: Lump Blue Crab Cake, Fried Green Tomato Jalapeño Pepper Jelly, Remoulade

Salad: Tuscan Kale and Romaine Caesar with Cornbread Crouton, Kalamata Olives, Asiago Dressing OR Wedge of Iceberg with Highland’s Bleu Dressing, Blistered Tomatoes, Benton’s Bacon, Shaved Red Onion, Walnut Pesto

Entrée: Grilled 8oz Bison Center Cut New York Strip Prepared Medium Rare with Highland’s Potato Gratin, Haricots Verts, White Truffle Butter, Roasted Wild Mushrooms OR Pan Roasted Red Grouper with Lobster Creole Sauce, Smoked Gouda Grits, Sweet Corn & Okra Maque Choux

Dessert: Bourbon Pecan Pie with Crème Anglaise OR Strawberry Shortcake

Wine pairings will be featured with each course courtesy of Constellation Brands.

The Grill at Highlands is located at 4705 Old Kingston Pike. Cost is $100 per person.

For more details and to reserve your place, please contact Mickey Mallonee at mickey@knoxheritage.org or 865.523.8008.


KCDC elects board officers

Knoxville’s Community Development Corporation (KCDC) has announced the appointment of new board officers following its annual board meeting.

Dan Murphy, a University of Tennessee professor of accounting specializing in federal taxation, will serve as chairman. Murphy was appointed by Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero to the Board of Commissioners in 2013.

Jacqueline Arthur, general manager of the community-owned food cooperative Three Rivers Market, was appointed vice chairman. Arthur also was appointed to the KCDC board by Rogero in 2013.

Resident commissioner Phyllis Patrick, administrative assistant at Evergreen Presbyterian Ministries, Inc., will serve as treasurer. Art Cate, KCDC executive director and CEO, was elected secretary.

KCDC’s Board of Commissioners is a seven-member body appointed by the Knoxville mayor to oversee programs provided by the agency, including affordable public housing administration, redevelopment and rental assistance. The board members began their one-year term as officers at the board’s annual meeting on May 28.

Other board members are: John Winemiller, partner at the law firm Merchant & Gould; David Hutchins, architect and president of Hutchins Associates P.C.; Lisa Wagoner, supervisor of health services for Knox County Schools; and Dr. John Turner, retired senior vice president of education, training and diversity at the Tennessee Valley Authority.

Since 1936, KCDC has been dedicated to enhancing the quality of life for the citizens of Knoxville. KCDC’s mission is to improve and transform neighborhoods and communities by providing high-quality affordable housing, advancing development initiatives and fostering self-sufficiency.

For more information, call 865-403-1100 or visit http://www.kcdc.org.


First gorilla born in Knoxville

KNOXVILLE, Tenn.— Knoxville Zoo is excited to announce the birth of an endangered Western lowland gorilla, the first gorilla ever born in Knoxville.

The baby was born at approximately 2:30 a.m. on Thursday, May 28, 2015, to 31-year-old mother Hope, who came to Knoxville in 2012 from Disney’s Animal Kingdom in Orlando, Florida, on the recommendation of the Western Lowland Gorilla Species Survival Plan.

Both mother and baby appear to be doing very well, and Knoxville Zoo staff are continuously monitoring them and the zoo’s gorilla group, which includes females Kowali and Machi and first-time father Bantu.

As long as the baby and Hope continue to do well and there are no concerns about their interaction with the other members of the family group, zoo staff will not intervene and let Hope do what comes naturally to a gorilla mother.

Hope's baby


Book sale benefits library programs

Knox County Public Library will once again host their summer book sale to benefit library programs this weekend.

The sale is from Friday, May 29, 2015 through Monday, June 1, at Bearden High School, 8352 Kingston Pike.

Thousands of beautiful used books will be available for sale, and proceeds from the sale benefit Summer Library Clubs and other programs at Knox County Public Library.

Revenues from volunteer-operated book sales combine with membership dues and donations to fund library enhancements that would not be available otherwise.

In 2015 Friends will contribute over $50,000 to the Knox County Public Library System, providing support for projects including Summer Library Club incentives, Zoomobile visits to branches, and sponsorship and volunteers for the Children’s Festival of Reading.


Rally North America visits Knoxville

Knox County Mayor Tim Burchett will serve as Grand Marshall and will be on hand to give drivers their starting orders on July 14, 2015 as Rally North America visits East Tennessee.

The event will be staging 80 cars from 31 states and three Provinces of Canada on the streets of Knoxville for a 3-day, 1200 mile, scavenger hunt which will conclude later in Savannah, GA. Secret check points are selected many months in advance that each team must navigate to in order compete in the event.

The automotive scavenger hunt is being held to raise funds for Hope For The Warriors. Since the organization’s inception in 2009 to date Rally North America has raised over $450,000 for chosen charities.

The mission of Hope for the Warriors is to enhance the quality of life for post-9/11 service members, their families, and families of the fallen who have sustained physical and psychological wounds in the line of duty. Hope For The Warriors is dedicated to restoring a sense of self, restoring the family unit, and restoring hope for service members and military families.

The race begins at Clinch Ave. bridge in Knoxville on Tuesday July 14, 2015 at 7:30 AM.


Knoxville Zoo hosts sports event

Knoxville Zoo’s Wild World of Sports event will take place Saturday, May 16, 2015 from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. at Knoxville Zoo.

Bamboo Playing Soccer

Athletic-themed activities include the chance for kids to interact with local collegiate athletes playing games that challenge them to move like animals.

Professional players and mascots from the Tennessee Smokies baseball team will be posing for photos and signing autographs, and guests can interact with other organizations representing the sports scene in Knoxville, including the Knoxville Force soccer team, the Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame and Knoxville Bubbleball, a member of the National Association of Bubble Soccer.

All Wild World of Sports event activities are included as part of general admission to Knoxville Zoo. Knoxville Zoo is Knoxville’s most-visited destination. Knoxville Zoo is nationally accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) and is committed to the highest standards in animal care and well-being, ethics, conservation, and education.

Currently, the zoo is open Monday through Friday from 9:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 9:30 a.m. until 6:00 p.m.

Admission and ticket sales stop one-hour before the zoo closes. Next-day admission is free after 3 p.m. For more information, please call 865.637.5331.


Knoxville Croquet tourney is May 17

KNOXVILLE – Knoxville Opera Guild will host the 11th annual Knoxville Croquet Tournament on Sunday, May 17, 2015 at 10:30 a.m. on the grounds of the UT RecSports Field Complex across from Dead End BBQ on Sutherland Ave.

Participation is open to the public, and no experience is necessary. Participants can register to play solo or with a partner, or may choose to simply attend and mingle in support of the arts organization.

“The Croquet Tournament allows us to gather and enjoy fellowship as a community while enjoying some friendly competition for a worthy cause,” said Knoxville Opera Marketing and Public Relations Director Michael Torano. “It’s a great opportunity to strengthen our support base and end the 2014-2015 Season with a bang.”

Along with playing croquet on the green, attendees will enjoy a gourmet brunch and high tea, raffle prizes, a bocce game, vintage automobiles, and vintage costume contest.

The Knoxville Arts Challenge competition will be presented by Mayor Tim Burchett. Registration will begin at 10:30 a.m. followed by the gourmet brunch and tournament. The event is proudly sponsored and catered by All Occasion Catering.

Ticket prices begin at $100. For more information, please call Audrey Duncan at 865.588.8371.


Statehood Day at Blount Mansion

KNOX COUNTY – Celebrating the pioneers who settled and transformed the southwest territory into the vibrant state of Tennessee, the Blount Mansion Association will be hosting its annual Statehood Day on Friday, May 29, 2015 from 6:30-9 p.m. in the Blount Mansion garden, which has been maintained by the Knoxville Garden Club for 81 years.

Additionally, there will be a chance to see the newest exhibit in the Visitors Center. The exhibit is an in depth look at the evolution of the houses and neighborhood from the time Governor Blount first built here in 1792 until today.

A cocktail dinner will be served by Holly’s Eventful Catering, and there will be an open bar available.

Knox County’s only National Historic Landmark and oldest house museum, the Blount Mansion is considered the birthplace of Tennessee, and it was built by William Blount who came to Knoxville to be Governor of the Territory South of the River Ohio. Under Blount’s leadership efforts were made to organize the Territory into the 16 Constitution may have been drafted in the Governor’s office here on the historic Blount Mansion property. It is owned and operated by the Blount Mansion Association, Inc., a nonprofit, educational organization.

Reservations can be made by phone at (865) 525-2375.


Knoxville Habitat hosts Spring boutique

Knoxville Habitat for Humanity is hosting their annual spring boutique sale on April 24 and April 25, 2015, featuring gently used designer clothing, shoes, purses, and accessories for women, along with unique home goods and furniture. Proceeds benefit Knoxville Habitat for Humanity. The event will take place in the Downtown West Shopping Center from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. and is open to the public.

For $25, attendees will enjoy the opportunity to avoid the weekend crowd by shopping early, complimentary snacks and beverages, and the chance to bid on the unique silent auction items.

The Knoxville Habitat for Humanity Restore offers deals year round on a variety of items for your home and for you home improvement projects.

The Boutique Sale fundraiser is a collaborative effort between S.H.O.P. and the University of Tennessee Retail and Consumer Sciences students.

Purchase your ticket at http://www.knoxvillehabitatforhumanity.com.


Total Quality Logistics creates jobs

Total Quality Logistics officials have announced the transportation services company will expand its operations in Tennessee by opening a new location in Knox County at 800 S. Gay St., Suite 810.

The company will invest $1 million to open a sales office in downtown Knoxville to meet the needs of its expanding client-base, creating at least 100 new jobs over the next five years.

This is TQL’s second expansion in Tennessee in just over a year. In January 2014, TQL invested $1 million to open its first Tennessee office in downtown Nashville. With the announcement of its Knoxville office, TQL will operate 31 offices in 17 states across the country.

TQL is one of the fastest growing providers of transportation logistics services in North America, connecting shippers who have product that needs to be moved with truckload carriers who have the capacity to move it.

TQL’s Knoxville office is expected to open in July 2015. People can apply for jobs immediately and should start the process online at www.tqljobs.com.


Knoxville hosts bike summit

City of Knoxville officials will present the finalized Bicycle Facilities Plan at a public meeting to be held Wednesday, April 8, 2015 at 6 p.m. at the East Tennessee History Center, 601 South Gay Street. The plan identifies the improvements that could develop a system of connected bike corridors, including on- and off-road facilities, that is focused on improving the accessibility, safety and convenience of traveling by bicycle.

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Knoxville city planners will present a map of the proposed corridor enhancements and the priority list of more than 100 projects including new bike lanes or other safety accommodations, to be designed to account for traffic flow and road conditions, at a public meeting in April. Photo by Celebrate Knoxville.

In addition, Knoxville is hosting the TN Bike Summit April 23 – 24, 2015. This event is a chance for the Knox area community to discuss how to build safe roads, strong communities, and a Tennessee where everyone is able to enjoy the benefits of bicycling and walking.

The keynote speakers for the Bike Summit are Gil Penalosa and Martha Roskowski, both of whom were featured speakers at the international Pro Walk/Pro Bike/Pro Place conference in 2014.

Visit knoxtrans.org.


Marble Springs features storytelling

Marble Springs will host the Smoky Mountain Storytellers on Saturday, April 11, 2015, from 2-4 pm. The event will feature performances by professional storytellers Shirley Nicholson, Kathleen Mavournin, Cuz Headrick, Sheri Liles, and Jennifer Alldredge. All performers are members of the National Storytelling Network, Volunteer State Tellers, Nashville, and Smoky Mountain Storytellers Association, which are non-profit organizations registered in Tennessee.

Attendees are invited to meet under the Marble Springs Pavillion and asked to bring their own chairs. Admission is $7 for adults and $5 for children. Parking is free.

This event is sponsored by Dogwood Arts Festival, Gov. John Sevier Memorial Association and Smoky Mountain Storytellers Association Programming assistance is provided by Knox County. Marble Springs is funded under an agreement with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Tennessee Historical Commission, and supplemented by additional funds raised by the Governor John Sevier Memorial Association.

“Storytelling has been a part of the culture and heritage of humans since time began, says storyteller Janice Brooks Headrick. “We are hardwired to learn and retain through stories. It is the oldest and best way to teach, entertain and enlighten.”

Smoky Mountain Storytellers have spread their living words all over the U.S., and in China, Ireland, England, France, Denmark, Norway, and Africa. They have entertained and educated in parks, patios, schools, libraries, universities, distilleries, resorts, restaurants, churches, retirement villages, and museums.

Visit www.smokymountaintellers.org.


Knoxville train bell is returned

Knoxville’s Three Rivers Rambler held a special ceremony recently to celebrate the return of No. 154’s stolen bell.

No. 154 is an 1890 steam engine that ran freight operations in Knoxville in the early 1900s. The engine was stored in a Knoxville park for fifty years before being restored by the Three Rivers Rambler train ride. The coal-fired steam engine- believed to be one of the oldest operating steam engines in the United States- has been in service on the Three Rivers Rambler for about four years.

ThreeRiversRambler

Last summer 154’s bell was stolen from the engine. Two members of the Knoxville community- Bo Shafer, owner of a local insurance company, and Finbarr Saunders, a city councilman- each stepped forward to donate a replacement bell to the 3RR. Bo Shafer’s bell is now in operation on steam engine No. 203. Finbarr Saunder’s bell will be permanently displayed in the new 3RR depot.

Due to the efforts of the Knox County Sheriff’s department, 154’s bell was recently recovered and returned today to its proper place. A replica of 154 was given to Sheriff Jimmy “J.J.” Jones.


Knoxville Opera performs Carmen

The Knoxville Opera is thrilled to present its fourth school tour this month. Bizet’s Carmen is the featured opera and showcases the music of Spain, including famous melodies and a cast full of charisma.

The performances are sung in English and feature Spanish costumes, scenery, and props. The school tour runs between now and January 16. This project is a part of Knoxville Opera’s annual $150,000 Education/Outreach Program.

“The overwhelming response from the past three seasons of in-school performances of Romeo & Juliette, Cinderella, and The Elixir of Love has inspired us to continue to share the music and cultural elements of operas with our local students,” said Knoxville Opera Executive Director and Maestro Brian Salesky. “It’s a wonderful way to transport these young people to another place and time, to educate them in arts and culture, and to inspire their own creativity.”

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Sarasota Opera mezzosoprano Briana Hunter portrays the captivating Spanish gypsy girl Carmen, UT School of Music alumnus Peter Johnson performs the role of the Toreador Escamillo, and Texas tenor Sergio Cepeda plays Don Jose, the Spanish soldier whose life is inspired and then destroyed by Carmen. The productions are free to Knox County public schools and will be accompanied and narrated by Salesky.

The school tour includes performances at Carter, Austin-East, Hardin Valley, and L&N STEM high schools; Holston, Farragut, Gresham, Jefferson, Carter, Northwest, and Robertsville middle schools; and Brickey-McCloud, New Hopewell, West Haven, West Hills, and Maynard elementary schools. An additional bonus show will be presented at the Mountain View Development Center.


Knoxville calendars now on sale

While making your New Year’s plans, make sure you plan to pick up a 2015 Knoxville Remembered calendar to keep you on track for all your appointments. This year’s photos include views of Chilhowee Park, the construction of the Kress Building, the Airplane Filling Station and many faces of Knoxville past. All photos used are from the Calvin McClung Historical Collection’s Digital Collection.

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The production and distribution of Knoxville Remembered calendars is made possible through partnerships with the East Tennessee Historical Society and the Friends of the Knox County Public Library.

Calendars are $15 and are available at select locations. Proceeds benefit the Knox County Public Library Staff Association. For large orders or to order by phone, call Casey Fox at 215-8713.

Calendar sale locations:
East Tennessee History Center Gift Shop
The Disc Exchange
Friends of the Library Branch Sales
Mast General Store
Pratt’s Country Market
Rala
Raven Records & Rarities
Rothrock Used Book Store (in Lawson McGhee Library)
Union Avenue Books

For large orders or to order by phone, call Casey Fox at 865-215-8713.


Knoxville gets new Civil War marker

Knoxville is getting a new Tennessee Civil War Trails Marker on December 5, 2014. Located at the Knox County Courthouse, the new marker tells the story of Union and Confederate rallies taking place in April 1861 only blocks apart on Gay Street.

VeteransMemorial

The Knox County Courthouse features several historical markers include a Veterans Memorial (pictured) for Knoxville’s soldiers who served in the Spanish American War (1898-1902), another honoring John ‘Nolichucky Jack’ Sevier, for whom nearby Sevier County is named, a and a WWII Memorial placed by the Simon Harris Chapter of the D.A.R. The new marker highlights the story of Union and Confederate rallies taking place in April 1861 only blocks apart on Gay Street.  Photo by CelebrateKnoxville.com.
The ceremony for dedication will take place from noon to 1:30 p.m., December 5, 2014 at the Knox County Courthouse, Main Street. Participating in the dedication will be Knox County Mayor Tim Burchett and Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero. Representing the state is Tennessee State Historian Dr. Carroll Van West, who, along with Tennessee Tourism Commissioner Susan Whitaker, co-chairs the Tennessee Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission.

Others participating in the program are East Tennessee Historical Society Director Cherel Henderson, and Calvin Chappelle, chair of the Knox County Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission.

The Tennessee Civil War Trails Program is part of a five-state trails system that encourages visitors to explore both well-known and familiar sites associated with events of the Civil War. Tennessee has 310 markers, and its trails guide is the most requested of the five states, which also include Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, and North Carolina.


Knox Heritage holds preservation awards

KNOXVILLE, TENN. – Knox Heritage holds its 2014 Preservation Awards ceremony and Annual Meeting on Thursday, November 20, 2014 at the Bijou Theatre in downtown Knoxville. The special guest of the evening is Knoxville’s Mayor, Madeline Rogero. Admission is free, and everyone is welcome to attend.

The event begins at 5:00 p.m. with a reception, followed by the Annual Meeting and Preservation Awards at 6:00 p.m. A report of the organization’s work from the previous year will be delivered by Knox Heritage board president Annette Brun. Mayor Rogero will deliver remarks before the Preservation Awards are presented.

Awards for the best in preservation during 2014 will be presented in the following categories: the City of Knoxville Mayor’s Award and the Knox County Mayor’s Award; the Greystone Award; the “Fantastic Fifteen” for preservation rehabilitation, restoration, compatible infill and preservation stewardship; the Volunteer of the Year; and the Media Award.