Family Fun Day at McClung Museum

KNOXVILLE—The McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, will host a free family fun day on Saturday, May 6, 2017, from 1 to 4 p.m.

The “Day of Clay” on May 6 will highlight the museum’s collection of ceramics by featuring clay objects from different cultures and time periods. Visitors will have the opportunity to work with clay and bring home their own work of art.

All materials will be provided and reservations are not necessary.

The McClung Museum is at 1327 Circle Park Drive. Museum admission is free, and the museum’s hours are 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Monday to Saturday and 1–5 p.m. Sundays. Free two-hour museum parking passes are available from the parking kiosk at the entrance to Circle Park Drive during the week. Free parking is available on the weekends. Free public transportation to the museum is available via the Knoxville Trolley Vol Line.


McClung displays mate to artifact

KNOXVILLE—A prehistoric Native American statue currently on display in the lobby of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville’s McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture is thought to be the female counterpart to a male figure that was named the Tennessee State Artifact in 2014.

Sellars statue_Sellar Statue

The pair appears to have been made by the same sculptor between A.D. 1250 and 1350, and the two rank among the finest prehistoric sculptures ever found in the United States. Both statues were found in the 1930s at the Sellars farm in Wilson County, Tennessee, and they appeared together for the first time in the Tennessee State Museum’s recent “Ancestors” exhibition. Paired male and female statues are thought to represent founding ancestors of the prehistoric Native American societies of the middle South.

The male statue was sold to UT in 1940 by the tenant farmer. The figure has been featured in several scientific and popular publications, including a 1941 issue of “Time” magazine and as a United States postal stamp celebrating the opening of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in 2004. It has been featured in various museums worldwide, including the 1992 exhibition “Tresors du Nouveau Monde” at the Musees Royaux d’Art et d’Histoire in Brussels, Belgium, and the Art Institute of Chicago’s exhibit “Hero, Hawk, and Open Hand” in 2004 and 2005.

The female statue was sold by the Sellars family to Lillard Yeaman, sheriff of Smith County and an amateur archaeologist, and then to John C. Waggoner Jr. of Carthage, Tennessee. Waggoner has loaned the statue to UT, and the pair will be on display in the lobby of the McClung Museum through the end of the year.

Recognizing the importance of keeping the statue in Tennessee and reuniting it with its male counterpart, Waggoner has offered the museum a purchase option. To reach this end, the museum is now engaged in a fundraising effort.

Exhibits at the McClung Museum showcase the geologic, historical and artistic past of Tennessee, as well as cultures from around the globe.

The McClung Museum is at 1327 Circle Park Drive. Museum admission is free, and the museum’s hours are 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Monday to Saturday and 1–5 p.m. Sundays.


Kid’s night out at the museum

KNOXVILLE—The McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, will host its first “Night at the McClung Museum” family sleepover from 7 p.m. Friday, June 17, 2016 to 8 a.m. Saturday, June 18.

The sleepover will provide children ages 5 to 11 and their parents the opportunity to spend an unforgettable night with dinosaurs and explore the museum’s new special exhibition, “Dinosaur Discoveries: Ancient Fossils, New Ideas,” on loan from the American Museum of Natural History, which reveals a vivid picture of what living, breathing dinosaurs were really like. The event also will feature family-friendly activities including dino-related crafts, a flashlight tour, games, a movie screening and bedtime stories.

nightatthemuseum

Tickets are $40 a person for museum members and $50 a person for nonmembers and include all activities and craft supplies, a survival pack with an exclusive event-themed bag, flashlight, evening snacks and supplies, and breakfast Saturday morning. Tickets may be purchased online or over the phone at 865-974-2144. Online ticket purchases will incur an additional processing fee. All children must be age 5 to 11 at the time of the sleepover and must be accompanied by an adult chaperone.

Participants can be dropped off and picked up in front of the museum, or parking passes will be available for $10 for those wishing to park their car overnight.

The McClung Museum is at 1327 Circle Park Drive. Museum admission is free, and the museum’s hours are 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Monday to Saturday and 1–5 p.m. Sundays. Groups may schedule tours by calling 865-974-2144 or emailing museum@utk.edu.

Free two-hour museum parking passes are available from the parking information building at the entrance to Circle Park Drive on weekdays by request. Free parking is available on Circle Park Drive on a first-come, first-served basis on weekends. Free public transportation to the museum is also available via the Knoxville Trolley Vol Line.


Free Day at McClung Museum

Families are invited to enjoy free programming throughout the month of February 2016 at UT’s McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture.

The museum will host a free Stroller Tour and activity from 10:00 to 11 a.m. Monday, February 8, 2016. This program will celebrate love around the world in honor of Valentine’s Day.

The tour is free and open to the public, but reservations are necessary and are first-come, first-served. Call 865-974-2144 to make a reservation.

The museum also will host a free Family Fun Day from 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. on Saturday, February 27. The tour and craft activities will celebrate African American History Month and will focus on Tennessee artist William Edmondson (1874–1951)—a well-known sculptor and the first African American artist to have a solo show at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Visitors can participate in tours and will work on a take-home craft.

The McClung Museum is located at 1327 Circle Park Drive. Museum admission is free, and the museum’s hours are 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday to Saturday and 1:00 to 5:00 p.m. on Sundays. Free two-hour museum parking passes are available from the parking kiosk at the entrance to Circle Park Drive during the week. Free parking is available on the weekends.

Free public transportation to the museum is available via the Knoxville Trolley Vol Line.


McClung Museum receives rare maps

KNOXVILLE—Almost 200 rare maps of Europe and other parts of the world created between the 1500s and 1800s now belong to the UT McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture.

Twenty of the maps are currently on display in the Burchfiel Geography Building. These, and the other maps housed in the museum’s collections, will be used for exhibition and teaching at the museum. They also will be used for undergraduate and graduate coursework on the history of maps and mapmaking from the sixteenth century onward and the importance of such maps to navigation, world politics, business and trade, agriculture, exploration, colonialism, and warfare.

“This collection of maps is a meaningful addition to our resources available for teaching, and several UT faculty have already taken advantage of the availability of the maps as a tool for inspiring meaningful discussions in their classrooms about cultural identity, political boundaries, and change, as well as socioeconomic conditions,” said Lindsey Waugh, the McClung Museum’s coordinator of academic programs.

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Students in Jovana Babovic’s Central European Cities class discuss political power, cultural perception, and urban development as they view seventeenth and eighteenth-century maps in the McClung Museum’s object study room. Photo submitted.

Most of the 191 maps are copperplate engravings with painstakingly applied hand color. They were created by mapmaking giants of the sixteenth to eighteenth centuries, including Gerard Mercator, the famous cartographer who was the first to plot the straight-line courses (Mercator projection) typical on today’s maps; Abraham Ortelius, the creator of the first modern atlas; Nicholas Visscher, whose family made some of the most famous maps during the golden age of Dutch mapmaking; and Guillaume DeLisle, popular for his maps of newly explored Africa and the Americas.

The gift came to the museum from Jeffery M. Leving, attorney and founder of Fathers’ Rights in Chicago. Two additional maps were gifted by Orrin Lippoff of Brooklyn, New York, and Robert J. Isakson of Mobile, Alabama. The museum worked closely with W. Graham Arader III, owner of Arader Galleries and a longtime UT donor, who facilitated these gifts.


Panel discussion at McClung Museum

KNOXVILLE—In honor of its new exhibit, the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture will host an artist panel discussion at 4 p.m. Monday, Feb. 2, 2015.

TanjaSoftic

Tanja Softic, a UT visiting artist and a professor of art at the University of Richmond, Virginia, as well as UT printmaking professors Beauvais Lyons, Althea Murphy-Price and Koichi Yamamoto will participate in the discussion. McClung Museum curator Catherine Shteynberg will be the moderator. Photo submitted.

Four of the 28 artists featured in the “Drawn from the McClung Museum” exhibit will be on hand for the panel discussion, which will highlight the artists’ choices and process, and the nature of the exhibition itself. “Drawn” pairs selected objects from the McClung’s collections with prints examining these objects in order to understand how art, science and culture are perceived and interpreted in museums.

The panel discussion, which will be in the museum’s temporary gallery, is free and open to the public.

The McClung Museum is at 1327 Circle Park Drive. Admission is free, and the museum’s hours are 9 a.m.- 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and 1-5 p.m. Sunday.

Free two-hour museum parking passes are available from the parking information building at the entrance to Circle Park Drive on weekdays. Free public transportation is available via the Knoxville Trolley Vol Line.